Have You Seen These Comic Book Style E-Learning Examples?

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - comic book elearning examples

At a recent workshop someone asked how to get better at designing elearning courses. My first response is to practice building courses. Which prompted the follow up question: “What should I practice?”

One way to practice is by becoming fluent with the tools you use and learning new techniques. A few weeks ago, David put out the challenge to create a comic book inspired design. These challenges help you learn the tools and think through different design ideas.

What I Like About Comic Book Designs

I’ve written about comic book designs in the past and showed a simple way to create a comic book template.

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - comic book elearning examples templates

What I find most valuable about this type of design is that it forces the content to be restructured. You focus more on story. These courses also look different and that in itself can be engaging.

Comic Book E-Learning Examples

Below are a couple of really nice comic book style courses that may inspire some ideas:

Broken Co-Worker by eLearner Engaged

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - comic book elearning examples broken co-worker sample

Click here to view the elearning example.

Prevention with Positives in Action by HIV PWP

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - comic book elearning examples HIV sample

Click here to view the elearning example.

Community E-Learning Examples of Comic Style Courses

Here are some of the elearning examples from the weekly challenge. Keep in mind they’re not intended to be complete courses. The idea of the weekly challenge is to practice something new or different, so a lot of them are quick mock ups.

Jeff Kortenbosch shared a neat example. What I like about his example is that it shows you can create quite a bit with PowerPoint. And you may even recognize some of the clip art.

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - comic book elearning examples using PowerPoint sample

Click here to view the elearning example

Paul Alders built a series of panels that zoom in and out. He explains his demo here.

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - comic book elearning examples zooming sample

Click here to view the elearning example

Lawrence Williams shows off a comic style course. I like the idea of clicking on the panels to navigation.

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - comic book elearning examples click navigation sample

Click here to view the elearning example.

Nancy Woinoski shares a comic style course that was actually the first project she built in Storyline.

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - comic book elearning examples Storyline sample

Click here to view the elearning example.

Examples of Comic Book Templates & Layouts

Yewande Daniel-Ayoade shared a storyboard that she created. I also like the forum conversation and some suggestions from others in the community.

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - comic book elearning examples storyboard sample

Ana Lucia Barguil shared some template layouts to help with the comic design. You can download the free template here.

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - comic book elearning examples free template

 

Cary Glenn also shared a Manga style layout to use with your comic courses. He also provided a demo example so you can see how it looks with content in the layouts. You can download the files here.

If you’re stuck with click-and-read courses (or you want ideas to make them more engaging) then a comic book approach like this may come in handy. If so, these elearning examples should inspire some ideas.

*Comic-Con image via Kevin Dooley


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Weekly Updates

Community Blog Posts & Tutorials

Upcoming Events & Workshops

  • January 23 & 24: Las Vegas, NV (TechKnowledge): Mike Taylor will host two creation stations on Building Interactive E-Learning with Articulate Studio ‘13.
  • January 29-30: London (Learning Technologies): I’ll be doing a quick presentation on interactive video using the Articulate applications. If you’re at the conference, swing by the Articulate booth.
  • February 4-6: Karlsruhe (LEARNTEC 2014): I’ll be at the conference working in the Articulate booth and would love to meet you.
  • March 11-12: Phoenix, AZ (ASTD). Details coming.
  • March 19: Sydney (iDESIGNX): I’m excited to attend my first conference in Australia. Looking forward to meeting many of the blog readers there.
  • Place I’ll be in 2014: Indianapolis, Lincoln, and Dallas. More to follow.

Post written by Tom Kuhlmann


Download your free 46-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

The post Have You Seen These Comic Book Style E-Learning Examples? appeared first on The Rapid eLearning Blog.

How to easily make a great YouTube Video

Whether you are working to impress the boss or to share your favorite game tips with friends, virtually everyone is looking to YouTube videos to catch and create the latest trends. In the past, creating great videos has been a difficult proposition, it’s difficult to imagine how you can go from average video surfer to […]

Tips for webinars or virtual training

“What works for webinars?” People have asked this a lot lately, so here’s my opinionated answer.

I do a lot of online workshops, such as the scenario design course that starts soon. I’ve ditched many of the conventional webinar techniques. Here’s what’s left on my list.

My main recommendation:

  • Include many, many thought-provoking questions for people to answer in the chat.

These aren’t polls or multiple-choice questions. They’re more like, “Here’s a problem. How do you think we should solve it?” or “Here’s a draft of a solution. What’s wrong with it?”

Dialogue bubblesI try to ask a question like this every couple of minutes. In my personal notes for the presentation, I highlight in blue every question I plan to make and then scroll through the file to make sure there are blue blobs sprinkled everywhere.

This results in slides that tend to be activities instead of information presentations. For example, I’ll display a slide that has a draft of a scenario question and ask what should be done to make it better. Information that might have spawned a series of bullet-heavy slides called “97 rules of scenario design” goes in the handout, where text belongs.

You could also repurpose a self-paced elearning activity. For example, you could run a scenario in the session. Display the first decision point and ask everyone what they want to do and why. As the debate goes on, one choice will probably surface as the preferred one, so click that and continue the scenario.

Again, I’m suggesting you do this as a discussion, not a poll. It’s harder on you, because you have to read a lot of chat comments, but the learning is far deeper and the issues raised will be surprising.

The chat is where it’s at!

This one change — your commitment to ask a ton of thought-provoking, open-ended questions — means that you’ll design a series of mini-activities instead of an information dump. Your participants will stay with you, thinking and participating, instead of clicking away to plan their Bali trip while you talk to an empty room.

This one change will require a few more changes:

  • You’ll need a webinar platform with a big, public chat window. For now, I’m using WebEx. I hope to use FuzeBox in the future when I’m sure that it plays well with the extreme firewalls some of my customers have. GotoMeeting is out for me because the chat window can’t be resized on my Mac.
  • You’ll need to stop talking and listen. I periodically say, “Hang on, I need to catch up with the chat.” I’m silent while I read what has happened in the chat, and then I respond to it.
  • If you’re recording the session and the chat won’t be recorded, you’ll want to read chat items aloud so the recording makes sense to someone who wasn’t there. Just as you do when presenting to a big group, repeat the question aloud before you answer it. It’s often impossible to read everything; I just hit the major points.
  • If the chat is super-busy, some participants might hide it so they can focus on you. That’s another reason to pause periodically and read aloud the major points being made.
  • As soon as people realize that you want them to use the chat, they will definitely use the chat. This might happen in ways you might not have intended, such as answering each other’s questions or literally chatting. Don’t try to control them. At least they’re in the room with you instead of pricing hotels in Bali.

Yes, you can handle the chat! It can help to have a second person, but I’ve flown solo with up to 400 people typing furiously away. They realize you can’t read and respond to everything. All you need to do is pause occasionally to catch up with the major points or questions.

Everything else

Some more tips:

  • Avoid headaches and reduce development time by creating a presentation without animations or transitions — PDF is usually safe.
  • Use a headset with a decent mic, not the computer’s default mic.
  • Limit sessions to 90 minutes at most.
  • If you’re providing a handout, make it useful, not just a copy of the slide deck. You might create a handout that includes the main slides with additional text.
  • Make the handout available at the beginning or shortly before the presentation, so participants can use it to take notes. If it’s in Word or another easily edited format, they can take notes right in the handout.
  • Practice giving your presentation, of course, timing yourself and allowing lots of time for the chat.

Finally, here are some common webinar techniques that I avoid. Maybe you can convince me that they’re great — leave a comment!

  • Not allowing public chat. This is Mortal Webinar Sin #1 for me. Probably 90% of the sessions that I’ve attended have no chat. You’re only allowed to send questions in secret, and they go only to the presenter. I rarely stick around.
  • Adding “interactivity” by using polls to vote on non-questions, such as “How many people here have seen a boring PowerPoint presentation?”
  • Sending people to breakout rooms. Maybe I just haven’t seen this done well. When I’ve been a participant, breakout rooms have meant five minutes of technological confusion followed by several minutes of “Is anyone else here?” and then “What are we supposed to be doing?” followed by me quietly disappearing to watch the Shiba Inu puppycam.

How about you? What are your favorite techniques for live virtual sessions? What do you recommend avoiding? Let us know in the comments!


Scenario design online course open for January and February

Become a scenario design master with “Scenario design: In-depth and hands-on,” a live online course (with lots of chat!). There’s still room in two of the sessions that start in January and February.

People who have signed up for the course alert list learn about new courses before they’re announced in the blog. Sign up and you’ll be among the first to know when the next sessions are scheduled. The US session sold out quickly after the last mailing — sign up so you don’t miss out next time!

My current very tentative plans are to have an on-demand version of the course available in April and to give another live version in July.

Image credit: iStockPhoto ©petekarici

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A Year’s Worth of Free E-Learning Templates & Tips for Success

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - free templates

Here’s a recap of posts from 2013 where I shared free templates or assets to help you build your online training courses.

Do You Need an Instructional Design Degree?

This is probably one of the hottest questions of the past year. It comes up quite a bit and creates a lot of good conversation—both pro and con. If you haven’t weighed in with your opinion, it’s not too late.

PowerPoint Tips & Tricks

Many elearning courses are dependent on PowerPoint. The more you know about it, the better you’ll be at designing good courses. The tips below help you learn more about using the features so that you become more fluent with PowerPoint.

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - free PowerPoint tips and tricks

Free Templates for E-Learning

Templates are a great way to get started or transition existing content for online training. Here are a few to speed things up for your next course.

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - free elearning template 1

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - free elearning template 2

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - free elearning template 3

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - free elearning template 4

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - free elearning template 5

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Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - free elearning template 7

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - free elearning template 8

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - free elearning template 9

Free Graphics & Media Assets for E-Learning Design

Articulate Rapid E-Learning Blog - compliance training meets Sharknado


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Community Resources & Tutorials

Upcoming Events & Workshops

  • January 23 & 24: Las Vegas, NV (TechKnowledge): Mike Taylor will host two creation stations on Building Interactive E-Learning in Articulate Studio ‘13.
  • January 29-30: London (Learning Technologies): I’ll be doing a quick presentation on interactive video using the Articulate applications. If you’re at the conference, swing by the Articulate booth.
  • February 4-6: Karlsruhe (LEARNTEC 2014): I’ll be at the conference working in the Articulate booth and would love to meet you.
  • March 11-12: Phoenix, AZ (ASTD). Details coming.
  • March 19: Sydney (iDESIGNX): I’m excited to attend my first conference in Australia. Looking forward to meeting many of the blog readers there.

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Post written by Tom Kuhlmann


Download your free 46-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

The post A Year’s Worth of Free E-Learning Templates & Tips for Success appeared first on The Rapid eLearning Blog.

Training: Go Mobile with Adobe Captivate 7.0.1

Topic: Go Mobile with Adobe Captivate 7.0.1 Description: The new update for Adobe Captivate 7 is loaded with enhancements to help you create stunning mobile learning courses using the HTML5 publish option. Join Suresh Jayaraman, Captivate Engineering Manager and Dr. Pooja Jaisingh, Adobe eLearning Evangelist, as they show you how to use the new mobile […]

Training: The exciting new features and enhancements in Adobe Captivate 7.0.1

Topic: The exciting new features and enhancements in Adobe Captivate 7.0.1 Description: Join Dr. Pooja Jaisingh, Adobe eLearning Evangelist, to learn about the new features and enhancements in Adobe Captivate 7.0.1. She will demonstrate the enhancements related to HTML5, Advanced Actions, Variables, Color Swatches, new Millionaire interaction, and a few more enhancements. Recording Link