The Purpose Driven Instructional Designer

Do you often struggle when answering the simple question, "What do you do for a living"? Learn how my child's answer to the question, "What does your mommy do when you're at work" helped change the way I describe my work, and so much more. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

6 Hurdles That Hinder Online Training Knowledge Transfer

Online training is not only more convenient and cost-effective, it also helps employees absorb and retain information. However, there are still obstacles that organizations must consider. In this article, I'll discuss 6 hurdles that hinder online training knowledge transfer and tips to overcome them. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Future Traits Of Instructional Design You Should Be Aware Of

With the fourth industrial revolution, change is here to stay. What traits would you consider useful for Instructional Designers in the future? This article explores 6 of them, as well as the underlying engine: curiosity. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

11 Principles Of eLearning: Demystified And Applied

For maximum impact, courses should be strategically designed with a combination of Instructional Design principles. But to effectively apply these principles, you must first have a clear understanding of their influence. Here, we demystify 11 of them. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

5 Basic Principles Of Instructional Systems Design

Strategies must include both practical experiences for learners to achieve core competencies in each area, as well as theory—the ‘why’ behind the result. With that in mind, here are 5 basic principles of effective Instructional Systems Design. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Incorporating Virtual Reality Content, Tools, and Devices into Learning Solutions

Incorporating Virtual Reality Content, Tools, and Devices into Learning Solutions

The concept of virtual reality dates as far back as 1938 when Antonin Artaud, a French director, and actor, referred to theater objects and characters as “la réalité virtuelle” in his essay collection called “Le Théâtre et son double”.  The English translation of this book, published in 1958 as The Theater and its Double, is the earliest published use of the term “virtual reality” (Artaud,1958).

Using Existing Content

Think about the use of existing virtual reality content in education.  Limitless possibilities await Instructional Designers/Developers.  The opportunities are there.  Instructional Designers/Developers can create learning solutions based around exploration type content that already exists. Much of this content is available free.  Imagine designing/developing learning solutions based around exploring the Smithsonian Museums in Washington, DC.  Virtual museum tours already exist such as the tour of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. These tours can be viewed using a mobile device or computer.

Let’s dive deeper and talk about tools and devices that allow users to totally immerse themselves in a 360-degree virtual reality experience.

Designing, Developing and Deploying Virtual Reality Learning Solutions Using Adobe Captivate 2019

With Adobe Captivate 2019’s built-in interactive features designing, developing and deploying realistic virtual reality situations and scenarios is a cinch.  Adobe Captivate 2019’s virtual reality capabilities can also increase productivity by decreasing the amount of time it takes to complete a VR project.  Interactive elements such as hotspots can add to learner engagement.  For more information on how to use Adobe Captivate 2019’s virtual reality features view the article “Adobe Captivate (2019 release) and Immersive learning with VR experiences” by Pooja Jaisingh (Senior Learning Evangelist) it is a helpful and insightful resource.

Popular Virtual Reality Devices for Content Playback

There are several devices on the market today that will allow playback of virtual content.  We will touch on a couple of these devices below.

Samsung’s Gear VR with Controller

In today’s world of technology, virtual reality is most recognized with products such as Samsung’s Gear VR with Controller which has a consumer cost at around $129.99 at Samsung.  When Gear VR is paired with a Smartphone such as the Galaxy S9+, Galaxy S9, Galaxy Note8 and more, the experience is awesome.  The user is immersed in a 360-degree world.  Also, the current Gear VR model weighs 0.76 lbs (without the Smartphone).  The Samsung Gear VR with Controller has been identified as a product for playing games and viewing movies.  This tool would be great to use in an exploration type learning solution as well.  There does not seem to be an educational type of package offered in any way for the Gear VR with Controller.  Google on the other hand does, so we now will take a look at Google Cardboard.

Google Cardboard

Google Cardboard is the most economical way to provide learners with that great virtual reality immersive experience.  Build your own viewer using everyday items (download the kit) or take advantage of one of Google’s certified viewers.  Just pair it with your smartphone.  Also, choose from a variety of low-cost Google viewers.  However, keep in mind that purchasing kit bundles such as Google’s Expeditions kits come at a high price.  The kits are priced according to the number of registered students. For example, at Best Buy kits range in prices between $4,750.99 and $10,499.99.  Also, there is the Google Daydream View Headset which we will not go into the details of in this article.

References and Resources:

Antonin Artaud (1958), The Theatre and its Double Trans., Mary Caroline Richards. (New York: Grove Weidenfeld, 1958).

Google Cardboard, Get your Cardboard. Retrieved from https://vr.google.com/cardboard/get-cardboard/

Pooja Jaisingh (2018), Adobe Captivate (2019 release) and Immersive learning with VR experiences, Published August 22, 2018.  Article retrieved from https://elearning.adobe.com/2018/08/adobe-captivate-2019-release-and-immersive-learning-with-vr-experiences/?sdid=LLVYTFD5&mv=display

Samsung, Samsung’s Gear VR with Controller, Information retrieved from https://www.samsung.com/us/mobile/virtual-reality/gear-vr/gear-vr-with-controller–galaxy-note8-edition–sm-r325nzvaxar/

Smithsonian Museum, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Tour, Retrieved from http://naturalhistory.si.edu/VT3/

Smithsonian Museums in Washington, DC, Retrieved from https://washington.org/smithsonian-institution-museums?gclid=CMPC3viYnM4CFUFbhgodZ50Bhg

Photo:

Article Photo by Bradley Hook from Pexels, Retrieved from Pexels.com at https://www.pexels.com/photo/sea-landscape-nature-sky-123318/

Wikipedia, Antonin Artaud., Article retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonin_Artaud

The post Incorporating Virtual Reality Content, Tools, and Devices into Learning Solutions appeared first on eLearning.

The Complete Learning Technologist Certificate Program – Coming February 2019

I’ve wanted to put together a learning technologist certification for a long, long time. Well, guess who had the same idea – Training Magazine! And they’re making it happen at Training 2019! Learning geeks will unite in Orlando for our three-day learning technology program February 22-24, 2019. You can register here.

  • Day 1: Creation and Authoring Learning Tools, presented by Jeff Batt
  • Day 2: Multimedia Planning, Tools and Gadgets, presented by Nick Floro
  • Day 3: Delivery and Emerging Technologies, presented by yours truly

I’m going to cover a variety of technologies on day three, in addition to discussing how to select and implement educational technology. And I’ll give you some free goodies to take home with you. Take a look at the program descriptions below and consider joining us at Disney’s Coronado Springs Resort!

The Complete Learning Technologist Certificate Program

Whether you are a designer, developer, manager, facilitator, administrator, or executive, you need to understand what learning technologies are capable of today—and what their promise is for tomorrow. Through demos, hands-on experience, checklists, and rubrics, this program goes beyond identifying the latest shiny training tech objects — and helps you become a well-rounded learning technologist who makes the optimal selection, design, and implementation decisions for your organization.

Day 1 Creation and Authoring Learning Tools; Jeff Batt, Head Trainer, Learning Dojo

Authoring tools change quickly and often, so how do you keep up? We’ll begin by examining the overall principles of development (i.e., elements, properties, behavior). Then, using those principles, we’ll begin our exploration of specific authoring tools. You’ll learn:

  • About the basics of course authoring, regardless of what authoring tool you may be using.
  • How development principles apply to current off-the-shelf tools like Articulate Storyline, Adobe Captivate and more.
  • How to make the appropriate selection for authoring tools.
  • How to learn any new authoring tool.

Day 2: Multimedia Planning, Tools and Gadgets; Nick Floro, Learning Architect, Sealworks Interactive Studios

Looking to bring your skills to the next level? On day two, you will learn how to get started building and designing interactive learning. Learn the finer points, practical skills that you can apply, and best practices for delivering engaging learning. You’ll learn about:

  • Architecting your next project with collaborative tools.
  • Sketching a storyboard from paper to PowerPoint.
  • Improving brainstorming and feedback loops.
  • Creating a prototype with Marvel app.
  • Using Explain Everything App to create animated explainers and promos and to provide feedback.
  • Thinking Outside the Box: 5 activities and concepts to add to your next project.
  • Building an interactive chatbot for learning.
  • Strategies for designing for learning and your audience.

Day 3: Delivery and Emerging Technologies; Katrina Marie Baker, Senior Learning Evangelist, Adobe

You’ve spent two days learning how to create engaging training resources. Day three focuses on how to deliver your content using the latest in learning technology and features content from Katrina’s books LMS Success and The LMS Selection Checklist. You will:

  • Define common types of learning technology platforms.
  • Demonstrate how technology can help you engage learners through the use of gamification, mobile learning, social learning, and blended learning elements.
  • Explain how to use reporting and analytics to understand the learner experience.
  • Describe the process to select a new technology platform, including the features and factors you should review with potential vendors.
  • Discuss the process of successfully implementing and maintaining a learning technology platform.
  • Cover best practices that include how to internally market your platform, curate your course catalog and content, and build an effective administrator team.

BONUS! You will walk away with supplemental materials and a free trial of Adobe Captivate Prime.

BYOD:  Please bring a WiFi-enabled laptop with Storyline and Captivate installed (trial versions okay).

The post The Complete Learning Technologist Certificate Program – Coming February 2019 appeared first on eLearning.

Build E-Learning Courses People Need

The training industry likes acronyms so today we’ll revisit one I shared a few years ago to help new course designers remain focused on producing real value.

It starts with the cookie story.

Two people are selling cookies in the neighborhood. One person bakes a bunch of chocolate chip cookies and sells them door-to-door. Unfortunately that person lives in a hipster neighborhood of Keto enthusiasts and those hostile to gluten. Not many want chocolate chip cookies. They prefer cookies that fit better with their diet.

The other person doesn’t start by baking cookies. Instead that person decides to canvas the neighborhood and asks what they neighbors prefer and takes orders specific to their tastes. From there, the person buys the ingredients required for each order, bakes cookies, and delivers them to satisfied customers.

The first person committed valuable resources to a product that many didn’t need or want. The second was able to manage resources by committing them to a product that customers did want.

Build E-learning Courses People Need

There are some lessons in here for us because often the courses we design are made to fit a general need, but not specific enough to provide value to everyone. The main culprits for this are lack of time so we just crank out a course to get it delivered and content-centric courses rather than ones focuses on the user or performance goals.

Training needs to be designed with the end-user in mind. Often we start with content and figure out how to package it into a”course” that we can deliver online. The mistake is that while the content maybe valuable, we tend to focus on delivery of the content as the end-goal. Then we become like the first cookie seller where we peddle a generic product that doesn’t meet real needs.

Here’s a simple cookie-theme acronym to help with working through the course design: OREO

While this isn’t revolutionary content, it is still a good reminder to have clear objectives and manage the resources appropriately. What tips would you share for beginner course designers?


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Agile production – online learning needs to get its skates on

Der Artikel ist „hingeworfen“: Ja, die Entwicklung von Online-Lernprogrammen, soweit sie dem klassischen Projektmanagement folgt (ADDIE), ist oft aufwändig und teuer. Und, ja, es sollte schneller gehen. Einige Stichworte, wie das aussehen könnte, erwähnt Donald Clark: „1. Assess and edit content, 2. Avoid SME iterations, 3. AI generated online learning, 4. Review actual content (online).“

Doch die Argumente werden überdeckt durch einfache Rechnungen, die „Cost Savings“ ausweisen, was mich an alte „E-Learning ist preiswerter als Präsenztraining“-Diskussionen erinnert. Und Donald Clark reduziert E-Learning auf die Inhaltsentwicklung und -vermittlung. Aber das war auch schon bei ADDIE das Problem.

„Business managers are often surprised when their request for online training will take many months not days, at 15-25k per hour of learning – oh and you’ll not be able to evaluate much, as the data is unlikely to tell you much (we have a thing called SCORM).“
Donald Clark, Donald Clark Plan B, 20. August 2018

Bildquelle: Goh Rhy Yan (Unsplash)