The 2018 L&D Global Sentiment Survey

Donald Taylor’s Report (27 Seiten) fragt: „What do you think will be hot in L&D in 2018?“ 1,051 Menschen aus 47 Ländern haben geantwortet. Dabei standen ihnen 16 Optionen zur Verfügung, aus denen sie drei auswählen konnten. Ganz oben stehen „personalization/ adaptive delivery“ (11,9 Prozent), „collaborative/social learning“ (10,1 Prozent) und „artificial intelligence“ (9,0 Prozent). Nichts Überraschendes, aber alles natürlich eine Frage der Perspektive. Für Donald Taylor wird 2018 jedenfalls „the year of Artificial intelligence (AI)“. Darüber hinaus legt er vier Jahre Global Sentiment Survey nebeneinander und interpretiert die Bewegungen einzelner Themen.

In einem Blogpost schreibt er über den Trend AI: „Whatever happens with AI and learning technology vendors this year, however, I believe that the longer term picture is very clear: Artificial Intelligence is going to revolutionize our lives, including learning. In particular, the traditional role of L&D in creating and distributing content will change for ever. The huge amount of content available both inside and outside the organisation […] will lead to our role as L&D professionals being far less about creating content, and far more about supporting learning.“
Donald H. Taylor, Juni 2018

5 Ways To Build A Transformative Training Program

The most competitive and innovative companies recognize that long-term success requires perpetual learning. This article outlines 5 key tips for establishing corporate education programs that enable and encourage transformation through applied learning practices. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

What’s the point of an LMS in the modern workplace?

Das Lernen in Unternehmen und Organisationen hat sich verändert und verändert sich weiter: es findet an vielen Stellen (online) statt, ist offener, informeller, selbstorganisierter und vernetzter geworden. Das hat auch die Rolle eines Learning Management Systems verändert. Jane Hart hat diesbezüglich ein kleine Thesensammlung erstellt und gibt uns gleich ihre Einschätzungen mit:

„1. It’s the place to manage compliance and regulatory training –  PROBABLY …
2. It’s the place to track access to and use of e-learning – IT CAN HELP …
3. It’s the place to host performance support and other resources – NOT IDEAL …
4. It’s the place to host social learning – NOT THE BEST …
5. It’s a source of continuous learning – PARTLY …
6. It’s the best way to engage people with learning – UNLIKELY …
7. It’s the place to track everything everyone learns in the organisation – AN IMPOSSIBLE TASK …
8. It’s the place to manage an employee’s own personal and professional learning – A BIG NO …
9. It’s the hub for all things learning – NO LONGER THE CASE …
10. It’s the only learning technology that a L&D department needs – BY NO MEANS …“

Jane Hart, Modern Workplace Learning Magazine, 15. Mai 2018

Bildquelle: Ken Treloar (Unsplash)

The Role of Today’s Trainer

role of today's trainer

The other day I was at Costco about to buy something. But before I made the purchase, I got online to do some research….right there in the store. I learned enough to make an informed decision. In fact, I was so “informed” that I was able to provide some assistance to another shopper. Despite all of that, I’m no expert on the product, but I am expert enough to meet my own needs.

And this is the world our learners live in, as well. As they have a learning need, they can access what they need when they need it because technology has changed the role of today’s trainer (or at least part of it).

At the start of my career in training, most of the content required to learn wasn’t always easily obtained. Thus it did require some research, meetings with subject matter experts, and a formal training plan to build and deliver training. Otherwise, those on the other end wouldn’t be able to access what they needed.

Today, a lot of that has changed. With the Internet, we have access to all sorts of information. And we can get it at the time we need it. Gone are the days for much of the formal training we used to build. They took too long to build and deliver. And often were hard to maintain.

Does it mean there’s no need for trainers? No! But it does mean the role is a bit different.

I like to think the new trainer has two areas of focus to ensure the training mission is complete:

  • Structured training
  • Convenient training

The Role of the Structured Trainer

the role of trainer structured

I see this as more of the traditional role of trainer where you meet with content owners, understand their needs, and put together a training plan. It’s designed to create a specific learning experience to meet a specific goal.

There’s a lot of value in a formal training process. A well-designed training plan can speed up the time to learn and mitigate potential issues. For example, many people have access to content, but it doesn’t mean the content is vetted or compliant with the organization’s needs.

On top of that, compliance and regulatory training often has to have specific content and be delivered a certain way. In those cases, the structure is important.

The Role of the Convenient Trainer

role of trainer convenient

This is where most people are. They have needs, they research them, and then do something with what they’ve learned. Does it means they’ve become experts? No. But it does mean they’ve gotten enough to do what they need to do.

So what’s your role in this world?

  • Curate content. Just because we can find information doesn’t mean it’s always relevant. And it takes time to find it. The trainer is a conduit to the content expert. Curate important information and make it easily available to those who need it.
  • Build a network of learners. A community is built around a shared interest and desire to grow in expertise. Find ways to connect learners so they can communicate, share, and learn from each other.
  • Keep it informal. This is usually where it breaks down. Organizations (and trainers) want structure and control. Thus, it’s hard to let things flow without imposing a bunch of organizational mumbo jumbo.

There’s a place for formal, structured training (see above) and there’s a place to keep it more organic. Organic allows people to choose the content that best serves their needs.

The two roles aren’t an either-or proposition. It’s not one way over the other. It’s just the reality that formal training doesn’t always have to be the plan. And a good training initiative builds on the informal aspects of learning and sees its trainers as part community managers who bring content and people together.


Download the fully revised, free 63-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

Upcoming E-Learning Events

2018
 

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

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Understanding Today’s Empowered Learners

To quote the famous bumper sticker, “Learning Happens!”

I use that quote all the time with the entry-level instructional designers I train. It’s a reminder that people learn regardless of the training plans we put in place. And often they learn despite them.

Learning is innate to being human. It’s part of our nature and we’re never in a mode where we’re not learning something. It doesn’t mean that we always learn the right things or make the right adjustments to what we learn, but we are in a continual process of learning.

In that sense, learning hasn’t changed much over the years.

Training Today Versus Yesterday

What has changed is how we acquire and use content to learn. In the past, training teams (or the content owners) controlled access to most of the content. In a sense, they were the knowledge brokers. They organized content into “training” and provided “certification.”

Learners Today

Today, it’s a bit different. Learners are empowered in ways they weren’t a few years ago.

  • The Internet (and internal networks) make it easier to catalog and find content.
  • Online communities connect peers who can extend the one person’s realm of expertise.
  • What they find, they can save, curate, and share with their community of learners.
  • Mobile devices mean people can access content at a point of interest or need. It gives them information at the right time, and often at the right place.
  • There’s an app for everything (or so it seems). And in the same vein, there’s a YouTube video for everything, too. Thus, you may not gain a deep understanding of the content, but you generally can get a functional understanding.
  • Do you need to be a certified expert? Seems people are more inclined to become micro experts with their fingertip learning.

Trainers Today

What can today’s trainer do to respond to these changes?

  • Focus less on formal training programs that tend to be too long and provide more content than is needed.
  • Lean more on bite-sized learning modules that are chunked to focus on single objectives.
  • Learn from online tech and marketing. They track people and know what to deliver and when. I’m not a big fan of online ads, but I will have to say I’m always impressed with the ads that Facebook serves. Usually, they are things that interest me. The same with when I travel. Google knows where I’m at and serves up relevant information, often before I need it. Seems that training could implement similar ideas.
  • Build a community and let it be organic. There’s a place for formal training. But there’s also a place for learning communities where people can curate and share. And they can do that with little formal oversight.
  • There’s still a need to vet content, but what’s vetted can be packaged differently in formats more flexible to meeting real needs.

The reality is that people learn. And they don’t always depend on what we put in front of them. In fact, often they learn faster than we can teach. Are we adjusting to the needs or still relying on an old-school model?

How are you addressing the changes in our industry?


Download the fully revised, free 63-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

Upcoming E-Learning Events

2018
 

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

Image already added

Situated Cognition And Meaningful Learning In College Classrooms

Knowing how to apply what is being learned in the classroom to the real world is essential for college students. Situated cognition can help instructors approach their classrooms as communities of practice (CoP) and see their students as apprentices in new fields of learning. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.