A Case Study On Gamification In Corporate eLearning

Successful corporate eLearning is all about engagement. Games, when used in eLearning, make online training fun, entertaining and engaging for learners. In this article, I will discuss a case study on a gamification solution that we delivered, which resulted in better learner engagement. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Mars Colony 01: A Journey Into JavaScript and Gamification

Launch the Mission: Mars Colony 01 Project: Play

Adobe Captivate 2019 incorporates a rich variety of accessible features and functions that allow developers to produce effective eLearning courses. However, whether the result of client requirements, or your own professional development goals, you may want to extend Captivate’s capabilities through the use of JavaScript or JQuery.

My interest in using JavaScript and JQuery was twofold. First, I wanted to brush up on my JavaScript skills, as I don’t specialize in JavaScript programming. I use JavaScript when a communication or training solution requires it, and sometimes its just not needed.

Second, I wanted to explore how JavaScript and JQuery worked within Captivate 2019. As I said, you may not need to use JavaScript, as Advanced Actions and Shared Actions within Captivate may get the job done quite nicely. However, there might be situations in the future when using JavaScript could work for me.

This showcase presents “Mission: Mars Colony 01”, a Captivate 2019 project created to explore using JavaScript to create simple Gamification functions. As my objectives were mainly professional development, I kept the style more on the “fun” side. Key feature highlights include a:

  1. Learner selected avatar and name
  2. System assigned performance “Level” based on quiz performance
  3. Timed perceptual speed task that includes automatic scoring

The main focus of the project was a perceptual speed task based on an ability test that measures how quickly a person can scan objects and detect similarities and differences. In this case, the user reads a pair of 6 digit numbers and must determine if they are the same or different. This section of the project required the most coding in order create the functions for the countdown timer, the toggle buttons used in the test and the calculation of test performance.

General Strategy

The general scripting strategy was, to the extent possible, to call all JavaScript and JQuery functions within an Advanced Action created for each slide. Back in the day, this was basically how we set up OpenScript within the Toolbook object hierarchy.

Once the Advanced Action is created and assigned to a slide for the “On Enter” event, the Advanced Action could be easily accessed, along with the JavaScript. This made updating and debugging the JavaScript code easier.

The bulk of the JavaScript was contained in the “my_java_code.js” file and linked to the Captivate “index.html” file via an include, as described by TLC Media Design. The .js file was written with Atom, with debugging accomplished with a combination of the Python Tutor and Developer Tools within Google. Note: I backed up my “index.html” file before altering it.

Avatars, Timers and Quizzes

It is worth noting that the coding for the project was based on the strategy or actual code for a number of Adobe Community contributors.

Selecting Avatars: To setup the avatars, avatar name and performance level, I used a method similar to that recommended by Paul Wilson that involved setting the state of a multi-state smart object based on a variable’s value. However, where Paul Wilson used advanced actions, I used a combination of advanced actions and JavaScript.

Countdown Timers: The script for the timers was based on Greg Stager’s 10-Second Timer 3000, with some modifications. First, since it was used to set a time limit for the perceptual speed task, some of the buttons weren’t needed. However, as I found out, the script for the “Cancel” task was essential for ensuring the timer was reset prior to continuing navigation. Second, in addition to the countdown clock, I included a countdown bar.

The Perceptual Speed Task: My original concept was to use radio buttons for the perceptual speed task, but I couldn’t find a solution. I did find a great article by Steven Warwick where he used JavaScript to create a custom true / false quiz using toggle buttons and this code did the trick. It is worth noting that Quiz slides contain very special objects that Captivate uses to communicate with the LMS. Its best to avoid deleting slides or objects, rather use the onboard options to hide objects or hide them within the screen using formatting or other objects.

Wrapping it Up

All in all I enjoyed creating the Mars Colony 01 project. I certainly brushed up on my JavaScript tools and learned a thing or two about JQuery in the process.

Files for Download

Captivate 2019 .cptx document: Mars Colony 01

JavaScript Code: my_java_code

References

TLCMediaDesign | Using External JavaScript libraries in Adobe Captivate

JavaScript.Info | Debugging in Chrome

Paul Wilson | Adobe Captivate – Allow Learners To Select Their Own Avatar

Greg Stager | Countdown Timer

Steven Warwick – Health Decisions | Building a fully custom quiz in Adobe Captivate using JavaScript

Graphics

BiZkettE1 – Freepik | Arabic Night Landscape 

Vectorpocket – Freepik | Set of Cartoon Spaceman Kid

Vectorpocket – Freepik | Set with Cartoon Astronaut Girl

Vectorpocket – Freepik | Cartoon Spaceman

Vectorpocket – Freepik | Spaceman Family with Space Ship

Vectorpouch – Freepik | Cartoon Solar System

NASA- JPL Caltech – MSSS | Telephoto Vista from Ridge in Mars’ Gale Crater

Sound

Mark DiAngelo | Wind Sound 

The post Mars Colony 01: A Journey Into JavaScript and Gamification appeared first on eLearning.

Here’s an Easy Way to Troubleshoot Courses with Variables

variables dashboard to save time e-learning

Variables add all sorts of capability to the learning experiences you create. They allow to move past linear, click-and-read content to more complex interactions with branched scenarios and personalized, adaptive learning.

Today I’d like to share a tip that really comes in handy when working with variables. It’ll save time and really help when you use a bunch of variables that are interdependent.

The 1-2-3 of Variables

Working with variables is a three-step process:

  • Create the variable: which is a like a bucket waiting to have a value
  • Adjust the variable: some action or trigger changes the value of the variable
  • Use the value: once the variable has a value or new value, that information can be used to trigger a different action

I explain that in more detail in this post on how to simplify working with variables in e-learning.

Add a Reference to the Variable for Troubleshooting

When working with variables, there is some trial and error and continuous testing. I always recommend adding a variable reference to the screen so that when troubleshooting or testing you can see the current value of the variable. This really comes in handy. If triggers depends on the value of the variable, you want to see that the variable is actually changing. If not, then you know where to start looking.

I explain that in more detail in this post on how to work with reference variables in e-learning.

Testing Variables in Your E-Learning Course

Here’s where it gets tricky. Some courses can have a ton of variables. For example, you may have a slide at the end of the course that requires dozens of interactions throughout the course. These interactions allow you to display personalized feedback. And each interaction is connected to interdependent variables.

Testing that everything works requires going through the course to activate triggers that adjust the values of the variables. This is really time-consuming. Unless you create a variables dashboard.

How to Create a Variables Dashboard

A variables dashboard allows you to be anywhere in the course and test how something would work depending on the value of certain variables.

For example, in a previous post we discussed how to lock navigation based on completing specific actions. To test it, requires completing all of the actions.

However, with a variables dashboard you can manually adjust the variables and then go to that single slide to test it. That saves a ton of time and frustration.

variables dashboard

Here are the basic steps to create a variables dashboard:

  • Create a slide that shows the current value of the variables and also allows you to manually adjust them. In the image below you can see I have buttons that let me change from true to false. There are text input boxes to add text-based values, and ways to adjust the numbers for variables that count specific activities.
  • Add this slide as a lightbox slide. I add it to the player so that it’s persistent and available throughout the course.
  • Prior to final publishing, get rid of the lightbox slide so that it’s not available to those who actually take the course.

variables dashboard

Below is an example of a test module I used for a recent gamification webinar. You’ll notice the “Set Variables” link on the top right corner. Go ahead and test it.

variables dashboard example

Click here to test the variables dashboard.

If you want to learn more, here’s a tutorial where I explain how and why it’s set the way it is.

Hopefully, you’ll find using a variables dashboard helpful and productive when build your own courses.

Learn More About Variables

If you haven’t used variables before, it’s time to learn how and then start to create all sorts of cool courses.

Here are some posts that will help you learn more:


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An Introduction To The Usage Of Gamification In Corporate Training

Gamification in corporate training is increasing as it demonstrates better learner engagement and creates a sticky learning experience. In this article, I provide answers to questions that you may have as you evaluate it for corporate training. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Rerun of a Popular Webinar: Social Learning & LMS Gamification

In July, we offered a webinar called Beyond The Buzz Phrase: Social Learning & LMS Gamification In Real Life. The webinar was attended by over 170 people from all over the world who contributed a ton of great ideas. And the discussion continued on social media even after the session!

Given the interest in this topic, we are going to rerun the webinar. Training Magazine will host our session on August 23 at 9AM Pacific. You can register here. The description and slides are below. Hope to see you – a second time!

Katrina

They are the two of the most popular buzz phrases in the Learning and Development industry—social learning and gamification. You’ve likely heard about the benefits of both in terms of learner engagement and retention. This webinar goes beyond theory and focuses on what gamification and social learning LMS features can do for your training program.

Join Katrina Marie Baker and explore how to:

  • Effectively blend social learning into existing courses using an LMS
  • Align gamification initiatives with business objectives so they contribute to your organization’s goals
  • Use learning technology to drive engagement using badges, leaderboards, and rewards

This webinar includes examples of gamification and social learning features found within Adobe Captivate Prime.

Look forward to seeing you!

The post Rerun of a Popular Webinar: Social Learning & LMS Gamification appeared first on eLearning.

Beyond the Buzz Phrase: Social Learning & LMS Gamification in Real Life (Recording & Slides Included)

If you were busy last Thursday, you may have missed a fun webinar about social learning and gamification.  We had over 170 audience members who contributed great ideas and feedback.  You can take a look at:

  1. The webinar recording courtesy of eLearning Industry, and
  2. The slide deck with images courtesy of Adobe Stock

Below is the session description.  Have an awesome week!

They are the two of the most popular buzz phrases in the Learning and Development industry—social learning and gamification. You’ve likely heard about the benefits of both in terms of learner engagement and retention. This webinar goes beyond theory and focuses on what gamification and social learning LMS features can do for your training program.

Join Katrina Marie Baker and explore how to:

  • Effectively blend social learning into existing courses using an LMS
  • Align gamification initiatives with business objectives so they contribute to your organization’s goals
  • Use learning technology to drive engagement using badges, leaderboards, and rewards

This webinar includes examples of gamification and social learning features found within Adobe Captivate Prime.

The post Beyond the Buzz Phrase: Social Learning & LMS Gamification in Real Life (Recording & Slides Included) appeared first on eLearning.

Video on Gamification in eLearning – 6 Killer Examples

Gamification in eLearning, that is, using gaming principles and elements, increases learner engagement. Here are 6 killer examples of Gamification that can be used in corporate training and enhance business effectively.

Using gaming principles and elements in eLearning has proven to create an engaging and sticky learning experience. These 6 killer examples of Gamification in eLearning promises to engage learners in a better way and gain better returns in business.

Source: https://www.eidesign.net/video-on-gamification-in-elearning-6-killer-examples/

The post Video on Gamification in eLearning – 6 Killer Examples appeared first on eLearning.