Atrasando o próximo código em segundos.

Como está você, espero que bem!

Dando sequência a Ações Avançadas no Captivate 2017, vou apresentar um código que atrasa em segundos a próxima ação.

Imagine que você deseja criar uma balão e deseja que o mesmo fique por um determinado tempo na tela, uns 15 segundos para que haja tempo de leitura.

Para isso, adicionamos uma Ação Avançada chamada de Atrasar Próximas acoes em: e você entra com uma literal com o valor desejado, vejamos na imagem a seguir:

A Ação que adicionei, fará com que, o slide demore 10 segundo antes de continuar.

Você poderá atribuir essa ação para diversos Comandos, diversas tipos de ações. É uma Ação bem interessante para leitura do slide, apresentação de uma imagem, Gamificações entre outros.

Abraços e até o próximo tutorial.

Fabio Oliveira – Fojool

The post Atrasando o próximo código em segundos. appeared first on eLearning.

How to Simplify E-Learning Templates

e-learning templates made simple

E-learning templates are a great way to save time. This is especially true for those of us who build repetitive content and courses. And it’s even more true for those of us who aren’t graphic designers since many of the e-learning templates provide nice looking visual design.

However, working with templates can be challenge. Sometimes they’re so big and present too many choices (which can debilitate). Another challenge is that modifying templates often requires a more involved understanding of the authoring tools. This isn’t easy for the person just getting started.

Templates should save time and streamline the production process. Otherwise, why use them? Here are a few ideas to help you get started.

E-Learning Templates Are the Second Step

Figure out what you need before you build. A big time waster is not knowing what you want in the course but building it anyway. Then realizing it’s not what you want, you tear down and rebuild. Or worse, moving forward with a bad idea and letting it dictate the rest of what you’re doing because of the time already invested.

I like the weekly e-learning challenges as a way to play around with ideas and see what others do. The challenges help develop fluency with the software and build awareness around ideas that can be implemented before you work on a project.

ACTION ITEM

Let the Content Determine the Right Template

Templates are great, but don’t let the template dictate your content. This is one of the biggest issues with templates. We like a template because it has sixty cool layouts and then we force our content to the template. Or we think we have to use all sixty layouts so we have similar types of content but it all looks different throughout the course because we changed up our layouts.

ACTION ITEM

  • Review your templates and the various layout options. Then determine when you use them and why. Even if you have a lot of great layouts, it’s a good idea to reduce the layouts you use. This provides visual consistency and repetition is key to good visual communication.

Keep E-Learning Templates Simple

Templates don’t always need to be big all inclusive files. It helps to have single purpose templates like just one tabs interaction. The more single purpose the template is, the better you can use it. It’s also easier to customize one slide to match your course than it is to customize an entire template.

e-learning templates

One of the most under used features in Storyline is saving the files as templates. This makes the slides available for the next course. You can insert a single slide(s) or the entire file. The new teams feature in Storyline 360 makes it even better because the slides can be shared among the team and easily inserted in courses.

In Rise, you can build lessons and save them as templates. Once inserted, they can be modified to meet the course objectives. And they don’t need to be big lessons, you may just want to customize some blocks for easy re-use.  This is especially helpful if you want to use a multiple colors or change the text sizes.

rise e-learning templates

ACTION ITEM

  • Create single slide templates in Storyline and save them as templates. If you’re on a team account, share them with your team.
  • Learn to create and save templates in Rise. I like to create branded blocks where I add different colors and text sizes.

Learn to Edit the E-Learning Templates

Inevitably you’ll need to modify the template. There are things you should learn about the software so that when you need to change the template it doesn’t take forever (otherwise you lose the time-saving benefit of the template).

ACTION ITEM

  • In Storyline, learn more about master slides and how they work. Also, theme fonts and colors allow the content to change dynamically.
  • Rise is a lot easier to learn. Focus on theme settings, duplicating courses, and saving lessons as templates.

Templates are a real time-saver. But to save time, plan ahead, and learn to use the software you use to build e-elearning courses.


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Save Time & Money with Hybrid E-Learning Design

Years ago I developed a hierarchy for course design. I used it to help manage my team and allocate our limited resources.

Back then, most e-learning was custom-built in Flash. Those courses took more time, required special skills, and cost a lot more to produce. However, with Articulate Presenter and PowerPoint we could build about 80% of what we needed. It was fast and easy. So our default was Articulate Presenter unless we could justify why it didn’t meet our needs.

 

PowerPoint had its limits. But when we needed custom interactivity, we’d build just those pieces in Flash and insert them into our PowerPoint-based courses. That meant we got fast development and custom interactivity: a win-win.

There were courses where PowerPoint or a hybrid approach just didn’t work. As a final option we custom built our courses in Flash. Because this was the most expensive and time-consuming option, we tried to limit this and do most of our custom development using the hybrid approach.

We always started with rapid e-learning and only moved to more expensive development when we could justify doing so. It made no sense, to custom build Flash when we could do the same thing faster and less expensive with PowerPoint.

Today, we have a similar challenge so let’s revisit the hierarchy of course design for a new generation of rapid e-learning designers.

General E-Learning Content

A screen’s a screen whether it’s simple linear content or interactive. When you look at the screen, you’ll see text and some media such as images, illustrations, and video. If there’s an interactive element, at its core the interaction just changes what’s being exposed on the screen.

How screens are laid out is generally limited to left, right, up, and While we can be creative and do exotic things there are 20 or so common screen layouts.

The Updated E-Learning Course Design Hierarchy

Both Rise and Storyline are part of Articulate 360. Often, I’ll get questions about when to use Rise and when to use Storyline. To answer the question, I lean on the same strategic approach I used when managing my team and having to choose between rapid authoring with PowerPoint or custom development in Flash.

Operate at the Speed of Business

Most e-learning content exists because of regulatory and compliance requirements. Those courses are more explainer content and less interactive. Thus it makes sense to use the easiest tool and quickest production process possible.

And this tool is Rise. It’s super easy to use and getting courses, especially simple ones out the door is a breeze. On top of that, whatever you build can be saved as a template. And as far as interactive content, there are a number of interactive choices that come with Rise (and those get updated frequently). Rise is also fully responsive which is perfect for today’s mobile workforce.

 

The reality is that not all content is explainer content and often there needs to be more custom interactivity than what you get out of the box in Rise. That’s OK because when Rise doesn’t provide the content type you need, use Storyline by building single slide interactions and then insert them into your Rise courses with the Storyline block.

With this approach, you get easy authoring for the majority of the content in Rise and custom interactivity when you need it in Storyline. It’s a good balance between speed of production and providing the appropriate level of interactivity. That’s a win-win.

Manage Resources for Custom Interactivity

There are times when working directly in Storyline makes more sense than working in Rise. For example, if you need to build complex interactions, adaptive learning paths, variable-based navigation,  or interactive scenarios then it makes sense to build them in Storyline. Storyline gives you a lot more flexibility because you start with a blank screen and build from there.

This doesn’t mean working with Storyline is complicated. It’s still relatively easy to learn and grows with you. It just means that for simple content, especially, Rise is usually a better solution.

Want a tabs interaction? In Rise you select the tabs interaction block and add your content. You’re done. Building the same thing in Storyline requires time to think about what it will look like and how it will function; and then you add the objects, layers, and triggers. It’s easy enough to do, but just a bit more time-consuming to do it. And time is money.

So when people ask which tool to use, I suggest that all things should start with Rise. If you can’t build it with Rise, explain why. If you need custom interactions, build the core content in Rise (you have a lot of options with the various blocks) and add Storyline interactions where necessary. And if your course requirements are more complex and they can’t be met with Rise, then by all means, use Storyline.

The main thing is you’re managing your limited resources.  If you spend a week building something in Storyline when you could have built it in one day with Rise, you’re not being a good steward of your resources. And when you need more time for custom work, you won’t have it because you spent it on simple content.

That’s where the content creation hierarchy comes in handy. It’s all about managing resources and delivering a viable product on time and within budget.


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How to Save Time When Using Variables in Your E-learning

variables to save time

Here’s a time saving tip when working with variables in your e-learning courses. This is helpful when testing your course as you work on it.

Create Reference Variables

During your production process when working with variables it’s always a good idea to create a reference to those variables. This is a text box that shows the current value of the variable. Thus when testing your course and making adjustments that change the value of the variable, you can see it displayed.

add a reference variable to the slide

If you don’t use a reference of the variable how else will you know the variable value changed? You have to assume that the course is working correctly, which may not be the case. Being able to see the variable helps in troubleshooting issues you may have when using them. For example, if the variable changes then you know something else is the issue.

Where to Put Reference Variables

The reference variables are only visible during the construction and testing of the course. Once it’s ready to go live, they need to be removed from the slide.

Everyone has their own production method. Here are a few options:

  • Delete them when you’re ready to publish the course. This gets rid of them, but if you need to go back and edit the slide, you need to recreate the references.
  • Move them off the slide. This works, but then you have to move them back on when you do edits. Seems like a lot of extra work.
  • Keep them on the slide, but hide them on the timeline. This means they’re always there, and just require a simple click to make them visible.
  • Put them on the master slide. I like this approach. I can turn them off on the master slide and they’re off on all the slides. And then if I need them available, I only need to turn them back on once rather than doing it slide by slide.

Additional Variable Resources

Here are a few quick tutorials and previous articles on working with variables:

Tutorials

Articles

What tips do you have when working with variables in your e-learning courses?


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The Future of E-Learning

future of learning technologies

Here’s an excerpt from a recent presentation on the future of learning technology.

I went to school to be a video producer. Right after I graduated, the video industry changed from analog to digital. At the time digital video technology was cutting-edge and super expensive. And I was stuck in a job with an organization that had no money, so I felt that everything was was passing me by and I’d never catch up.

I see a lot of the same things in our industry today. So much is changing and it’s hard to keep up. It can be quite stressful.

We’ll look at some emerging technologies and how they impact our jobs and then how it really impacts you.

E-Learning Democratized

future of learning technologies e-learning democratized

A few years back, it was expensive to build e-learning courses. That changed with the PowerPoint-to-Flash tools like Articulate Studio. Those tools let all organizations into the e-learning world and made it possible to bring course content to the masses.

Over time, the tools evolved as we went from PowerPoint to Storyline.

E-Learning Made Easy

e-learning made easy future of learning technologies

It took a lot to build web pages a few years back. Now you have sites like Wix where you can build a pretty sophisticated site in minutes. The same thing is happening with e-learning. Look at how easy it is to build a course in Rise.

There are the naysayers who complain about this. I actually had someone tell me that we should limit access to the software to only people with the training to build courses. That may have worked in the Soviet Union, but I prefer a less elitist approach. Give them the tools and then help them learn to use them better is a more charitable approach.

Besides, organizations will always opt for quicker, cheaper delivery (especially when most of their courses are explainer-type content).

Virtual Reality is Virtually Here

One emerging technology is virtual reality (VR). When done right it can create truly immersive experiences. I’ve seen some really cool demos and it’s definitely going to create opportunities for different ways to learn.

With that said, many of the virtual reality demos I see are simple 360° videos with clickable hotspots. They’re not much more than labeled graphics. There is a novelty to them, but it seems like a lot of work to create video labeled graphics. Not sure how much more valuable they are than static images once you get past the novelty of viewing them.

future of learning technologies virtual reality made real

The real value in virtual reality is being able to interact with the environment and not just move around and click for information, like in the images above where you work in a simulated dental office.

The reality (that’s not virtual) is that building an immersive virtual environment is cost prohibitive for most organizations. Until the costs to produce come way down, for most organizations virtual reality will be a pipe dream.

Augmented Reality is a More Affordable Reality

With augmented reality (AR) a lot of the cost of production is reduced. Instead of trying to create a virtual world, we augment the real world with additional content and experiences.

future of learning technologies augmented reality in the real world

Ikea and other sites allows us to put furniture in real rooms to see how it will fit.

future of learning technologies augmented reality to translate content

We can use our phones to translate content in real time or learn what’s around us.

future of learning technologies augmented reality to train new skills

And we can learn new things, just in time at our point of need.

If you want to play around with augmented reality, check out HP Reveal and learn more about what some of the tech leaders are doing:

The Technology That Will Really Change Your Job

Virtual and augmented realities are cool and obviously have a role in our industry, but the technologies that will really change your jobs are artificial intelligence (AI) and big data.

future of learning technologies chatbots to deliver training

future of learning technologies automated response

Most of what drives e-learning is compliance and regulatory training. Often, we’re just rehashing content that already exists someplace else. Soon, that’ll all be automated. Organizations will be able to pull custom content together to meet the needs of its learners. They’ll be able to create chatbots and other tools to push what you need when you need it. This emerging technology will create articles, documentation, guided instruction, and probably even videos. In that world there won’t be much need for instructional designers.

While it’s exciting to see and anticipate these emerging technologies, it does induce a bit of stress. Can we keep up? Will we be out of work?

I’ll leave you with this one thought.

Twenty-five years ago when I created custom presentations using Harvard Graphics (pre PowerPoint) I thought that one day people will know how easy this is and I’ll be out of work. Today, close to three decades later, not much has changed. Sure we’ve got a lot of cool technologies and all of that. But the presentations and the courses are still mostly the same quality (for good or bad).

So take heart in knowing that you’re part of an exciting industry with emerging technology, but don’t fear being out of work anytime soon.


Download the fully revised, free 63-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

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2018
 

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Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

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The Role of Today’s Trainer

role of today's trainer

The other day I was at Costco about to buy something. But before I made the purchase, I got online to do some research….right there in the store. I learned enough to make an informed decision. In fact, I was so “informed” that I was able to provide some assistance to another shopper. Despite all of that, I’m no expert on the product, but I am expert enough to meet my own needs.

And this is the world our learners live in, as well. As they have a learning need, they can access what they need when they need it because technology has changed the role of today’s trainer (or at least part of it).

At the start of my career in training, most of the content required to learn wasn’t always easily obtained. Thus it did require some research, meetings with subject matter experts, and a formal training plan to build and deliver training. Otherwise, those on the other end wouldn’t be able to access what they needed.

Today, a lot of that has changed. With the Internet, we have access to all sorts of information. And we can get it at the time we need it. Gone are the days for much of the formal training we used to build. They took too long to build and deliver. And often were hard to maintain.

Does it mean there’s no need for trainers? No! But it does mean the role is a bit different.

I like to think the new trainer has two areas of focus to ensure the training mission is complete:

  • Structured training
  • Convenient training

The Role of the Structured Trainer

the role of trainer structured

I see this as more of the traditional role of trainer where you meet with content owners, understand their needs, and put together a training plan. It’s designed to create a specific learning experience to meet a specific goal.

There’s a lot of value in a formal training process. A well-designed training plan can speed up the time to learn and mitigate potential issues. For example, many people have access to content, but it doesn’t mean the content is vetted or compliant with the organization’s needs.

On top of that, compliance and regulatory training often has to have specific content and be delivered a certain way. In those cases, the structure is important.

The Role of the Convenient Trainer

role of trainer convenient

This is where most people are. They have needs, they research them, and then do something with what they’ve learned. Does it means they’ve become experts? No. But it does mean they’ve gotten enough to do what they need to do.

So what’s your role in this world?

  • Curate content. Just because we can find information doesn’t mean it’s always relevant. And it takes time to find it. The trainer is a conduit to the content expert. Curate important information and make it easily available to those who need it.
  • Build a network of learners. A community is built around a shared interest and desire to grow in expertise. Find ways to connect learners so they can communicate, share, and learn from each other.
  • Keep it informal. This is usually where it breaks down. Organizations (and trainers) want structure and control. Thus, it’s hard to let things flow without imposing a bunch of organizational mumbo jumbo.

There’s a place for formal, structured training (see above) and there’s a place to keep it more organic. Organic allows people to choose the content that best serves their needs.

The two roles aren’t an either-or proposition. It’s not one way over the other. It’s just the reality that formal training doesn’t always have to be the plan. And a good training initiative builds on the informal aspects of learning and sees its trainers as part community managers who bring content and people together.


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Understanding Today’s Empowered Learners

To quote the famous bumper sticker, “Learning Happens!”

I use that quote all the time with the entry-level instructional designers I train. It’s a reminder that people learn regardless of the training plans we put in place. And often they learn despite them.

Learning is innate to being human. It’s part of our nature and we’re never in a mode where we’re not learning something. It doesn’t mean that we always learn the right things or make the right adjustments to what we learn, but we are in a continual process of learning.

In that sense, learning hasn’t changed much over the years.

Training Today Versus Yesterday

What has changed is how we acquire and use content to learn. In the past, training teams (or the content owners) controlled access to most of the content. In a sense, they were the knowledge brokers. They organized content into “training” and provided “certification.”

Learners Today

Today, it’s a bit different. Learners are empowered in ways they weren’t a few years ago.

  • The Internet (and internal networks) make it easier to catalog and find content.
  • Online communities connect peers who can extend the one person’s realm of expertise.
  • What they find, they can save, curate, and share with their community of learners.
  • Mobile devices mean people can access content at a point of interest or need. It gives them information at the right time, and often at the right place.
  • There’s an app for everything (or so it seems). And in the same vein, there’s a YouTube video for everything, too. Thus, you may not gain a deep understanding of the content, but you generally can get a functional understanding.
  • Do you need to be a certified expert? Seems people are more inclined to become micro experts with their fingertip learning.

Trainers Today

What can today’s trainer do to respond to these changes?

  • Focus less on formal training programs that tend to be too long and provide more content than is needed.
  • Lean more on bite-sized learning modules that are chunked to focus on single objectives.
  • Learn from online tech and marketing. They track people and know what to deliver and when. I’m not a big fan of online ads, but I will have to say I’m always impressed with the ads that Facebook serves. Usually, they are things that interest me. The same with when I travel. Google knows where I’m at and serves up relevant information, often before I need it. Seems that training could implement similar ideas.
  • Build a community and let it be organic. There’s a place for formal training. But there’s also a place for learning communities where people can curate and share. And they can do that with little formal oversight.
  • There’s still a need to vet content, but what’s vetted can be packaged differently in formats more flexible to meeting real needs.

The reality is that people learn. And they don’t always depend on what we put in front of them. In fact, often they learn faster than we can teach. Are we adjusting to the needs or still relying on an old-school model?

How are you addressing the changes in our industry?


Download the fully revised, free 63-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

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Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

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Understanding the basics of Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy application in eLearning

Introduction

While the usage of Bloom’s Taxonomy (BT) to nail the learning outcomes has been used for training over several decades, the Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (RBT) brings in an added dimension that enables it to be used more effectively to design eLearning.

In this blog, I touch upon the basics of Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (in contrast to Bloom’s Taxonomy). Then I move on to showcase how can you use RBT to design the learning architecture of eLearning courses. Specifically, I touch upon how you can use RBT to bring in behavioural change.

What are the changes that were made to Bloom’s Taxonomy to create the Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy?

The Bloom’s Taxonomy was revised by Lorin Anderson and others. This is reflected as following two changes:

  1. Replacement of the nouns with appropriate verbs
  2. Change in the order of verbs (the last two levels were interchanged)

The figure illustrates the revised structure. For an easy reference, the Bloom’s Taxonomy is shared along side.

Blooms taxonomy and revised blooms taxonomy

Let’s see both these revisions in detail.

  1. Remembering: Recall information and exhibit the memory of previously learned material, information or knowledge (could be facts, terms, basic concepts or answers to questions).
  2. Understanding: Demonstrate understanding of facts and ideas by organising, comparing, translating, interpreting, giving descriptions and stating the main ideas.
  3. Applying: Use information in new or familiar situations to resolve problems by using the acquired facts, knowledge, rules and techniques.
  4. Analysing: Examine and slice information into portions by understanding causes or motives; make inferences and find evidence to support generalisations.
  5. Evaluating: Express and defend opinions through judgements about information, authenticity of ideas or work quality, according to certain criteria.
  6. Creating: Organise, integrate and utilise the concepts into a plan, product or proposal that is new; compile information together in a different way.

How can Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (RBT) be used in designing eLearning courses?

The learning architecture of the eLearning course is crafted using RBT.

RBT guides the creation of an online learning solution based on the kind of knowledge and the level of cognitive/affective complexity of the course. The process of mapping the course creation to RBT ensures the learning experience is crafted as per an accepted and ratified framework. It also allows more time to craft an engaging online learning experience.

Application of RBT

  1. During the initial phase of a project life cycle, appropriate Revised Bloom’s verbs are applied to write the Terminal Learning Outcomes (TLOs) and the Enabling Learning Outcomes (ELOs) of the course.
  2. Once the TLOs and ELOs have been determined, the RBT also guides in determining the presentation style for individual frames in the content.

NOTE: The second aspect is the significant value-add that RBT provides to create eLearning courses. We can tag the content to various content types (Fact, Principle, Process, Procedure and so on). Looking at the nature of the content, we can identify how it should be presented in the online format (as static information, an interactive frame or a knowledge check that reinforces learning or validates the required cognition level).

Can Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (RBT) be used to create or impact behavioural change?

The Affective Domain addresses interests, attitudes, opinions, appreciations, values and emotional sets.

If your aim is to bring about a behavioural or attitude change through the learning, then structure the information to progress through the levels of the Affective domain, as shown here:

  1. Receiving: Focus of attention and simple response to stimuli
  2. Responding: Active participation and reaction
  3. Valuing: Ascribing a value to an object, phenomenon or concept; ranges from acceptance to commitment
  4. Organising: Bringing together different values, resolving clashes among them and starting to build an internally consistent value system
  5. Internalising: Acquiring a value system that has governed the learner’s behaviour for a sufficiently long time

Please refer to the table that lists the action verbs corresponding to the Affective Domains that can be used to create the learning objectives in eLearning courses.

Affective Complexity Behavioral Terms
Receiving Asks, chooses, identifies, locates, points to, sits erect
Responding Replies, complies, describes, aids, performs, practices, reads, reports, writes assists, presents
Valuing Differentiates, explains, initiates, justifies, proposes, shares
Organising Arranges, combines, compares, generalises, integrates, modifies, organises, synthesises
Internalising Acts, discriminates, displays, influences, listens, modifies, performs, practices, proposes, qualifies, questions, revises, serves, solves, verifies balance

I hope this blog gives you the required cues on what is Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (RBT) and, in contrast to Bloom’s Taxonomy (BT), how is it more effective in creating the learning architecture of eLearning courses.

Need More?

Want more insights on the Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (RBT) and how to use it to design eLearning courses?

Schedule a call with our Solutions Architecting Team.

Additionally, you can take our online course on Instructional Design Fundamentals, one of the 15 Instructional Design courses from the first suite of our ‘InSight’ product line. For more details and to buy the course, click here.

Source: https://www.eidesign.net/understanding-basics-revised-blooms-taxonomy-application-elearning/

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Build Effective Courses That Put the Learners in Charge

effective e-learning tips

Here’s part two of a recent presentation I did on letting learners drive. It presented foundational ideas on how to build engaging e-learning courses and then focused on tips that help make the courses more learner-centric.

In part one, we looked at how to create engaging training. And in this part, we’ll look at how to make it effective.

Generally speaking, most training is info-centric where content plays the main role. Obviously, content is important. But when it comes to building a course, content in a meaningful context is what matters.

Here are some tips on how to create courses that focus on the learner’s context.

Effective Courses Creating Relevant Context

effective courses are relevant

As we mentioned in the previous post, content needs context and that context needs to be relevant to the end user. How is the content used in what they do in real life situations?

Effective Courses Address Diverse Learner Needs

effective courses

Some people come to the courses as experts and some as novices. Thus, courses can’t all be one size fits all. Do a user analysis to understand the learners and their needs. Then build mechanisms in the course that give them the freedom to learn where it works best for them.

Effective Courses Give the Learners Control

effective courses let users choose

Think of your course live a textbook. Many are designed to flow in a linear path, but most people jump around topics for reference. They don’t always read everything. They usually just read to learn what they need.

That’s how it works online, as well. Want to learn something? Do a  search on YouTube.

effective courses free navigational control

My guess is you jump right into the heart of the matter and skip over a lot of nice-to-know content that wasn’t critical to your search objective.

Why not design the learning experience more like that? Why does it have to be linear?

Effective Courses Expose the Need for Learning

effective courses expose the need to learn

We tend to push content out, but we want the learner to pull it in. But we need to give them a reason to pull. One way is to expose the need to acquire content. We could challenge what they know—challenge their understanding.

This could happen with a simple assessment upfront. Not designed to pass or fail them, but instead, it’s designed to expose their need to know more. Or the assessment can be more complex like an interactive scenario.

Effective Courses Let the Learners Explore

effective courses let learners explore content

The learning experience is more than just presenting information. Information needs to be used in context. A great way to do this is to allow the learner to explore and discover content. Of course, they need to have a reason to explore.

Effective Courses Provide Contextual Scenarios

effective courses decision-making scenarios

One way to get learners to pull in contact is to have them make decisions. Create decision-making scenarios where they have to solve a problem or take some sort of action. Then use that as a way to present content they can explore, collect, and consume to make the best decision.

Effective Courses Sort Learners by Experience

effective courses sort learners

One way to provide better learning experiences is to sort learners. This can be by role, tenure, or competency. The sorting process can be simple or complex, adaptive learning paths. In either case, it helps you build a better course and it creates a better experience for the one who has to go through it.

Effective Courses Sort by Understanding

effective courses sort by understanding and competency

An easy way to sort learners is by how much they understand. This is an effective way to design annual compliance training. At the front end, challenge their level of understanding. If they demonstrate competency, then move them past content (or to the end). If they can’t demonstrate competency, move them through the content.

Effective Courses Sort by Experience or Role

effective courses sort by experience

Another common way to build the learning path is by role or experience. Create a mechanism at the front end to sort learners and then create a path that adapts to how they were sorted. If there are places where this is common content, put that up front and then branch them once they get past it.

There’s a lot that goes into building effective courses. It all starts will clear objectives that can be measured. From there, create meaningful and contextual decision-making opportunities. Ultimately, a course is designed for learning, so giving the learner as much control as possible in the process will only make it that much more effective.


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Top 5 Tips For Innovative eLearning Development

Amongst the challenges that Learning and Development teams and Learning Consultants face today, the top 2 pertaining to training would be: 1) How to increase the efficacy of training?, and 2) What learning strategies should be adopted to ensure that the learning and business mandates are met? In this article I will outline 5 tips for innovative eLearning development that will help organizations improve efficacy of training by making the learning stick.

Innovative eLearning Development

Did you know?

In 1885, Herman Ebbinghaus, a German Psychologist defined the exponential nature of forgetting. As you see from this diagram featuring the “Forgetting Curve”, we forget 80% of what we learned in 30 days!

EID_Innovative_eLearning_image_02

How can we improve stickiness of learning?

By following innovative learning strategies outlined in this article, you will be able to create the required “Chain of Impact”.

EID_Innovative_eLearning_image_01

How can we improve stickiness of learning?

To create the “Chain of Impact,” we need to adopt ways to ensure the learning sticks. Sticky learning is the learning that lasts over time.

This can be achieved through many approaches. One of the significant approaches is adopting learning strategies that:

    1. Focus on action (“to do” things rather than “seeing” how they should be done)
    2. Build on the current schema of the learners (draw upon what they know)
    3. Allow exploration (enable self-discovery)

5 Tips to improve stickiness of learning through innovative eLearning development

We have a range of solutions that improve learning, recall, and retention. These are rendered through our innovative eLearning development framework.

My top 5 tips are:

1. Use Gamification for learning

You can use the power of games to deliver specific learning outcomes in your learning and performance strategy. You can opt for:

    1. Overlay of a gamification concept on your content to have the whole course gamified through levels, board games, or challenges
    2. Partial Gamification of inline checks and assessments

EID_Innovative_eLearning_image_03-800x537

2. Use Interactive videos (particularly for micro-learning)

Today, several options are available to convert linear videos to interactive videos that can create an immersive and engaging experience. The passivity of the videos can be overcome by providing learning interactions, knowledge checks, and feedback.

EID_Innovative_eLearning_image_04-800x450

3. Use Decision-making branching simulations

You can use branching scenario simulations to move the learning process from mere knowledge acquisition to its application. These simulations can complement the scenario-based approach and should be used when learners need to deep dive into multiple related facets or handle a far more complex situation.

This approach helps learners work in a safe environment (where they can practice and also easily recover from the mistakes they may have made). They can evaluate different aspects and get a sense of what impact their choices can have.

EID_Innovative_eLearning_image_05-800x502

4. Use Story based learning (Storytorials)

A proven approach, the story-based approach (Storytorial) combines the principles of Instructional Design with the compelling power of a story. The dual impact enhances the quality of learning, resulting in an immersive learning experience.

Storytorials are strung together in a fictional narrative and generally have a beginning, body and an end. While a story may have multiple plots based on the content, you need to make sure that the central theme of the story sticks to the content and avoid redundant material that has little or no contribution to make to the training.

EID_Innovative_eLearning_image_06-800x521

5. Use Scenario based learning

As per ATD (Association of Talent Development), Scenario-Based Learning (SBL) is a proven method to build expertise in tasks that are unsafe or infrequent in the workplace or to build critical thinking skills.

You can use scenarios to create learning activities where learners are presented with a real life situation or problem and they must work through it to achieve their goals. Although most of these interactions help hone learners’ cognitive skills, there is always the option of adding an emotional element for greater learner engagement. An example of this would be simulating a real-life situation where every decision that the learners make has a direct bearing on themselves or their colleagues.

EID_Innovative_eLearning_image_07-800x521

I hope this article featuring innovative eLearning development provides the required cues that you can practically apply to create a “learning retention and recall curve” for your organization.

Source: https://www.eidesign.net/top-5-tips-for-innovative-elearning-development-2/

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