How to Create Captions for Live Presentations

closed captions and live transcripts

I present at a lot of conferences and workshops. I’ve always thought about having captions during the live presentations. They come in handy for the person who can’t hear and needs them. And they potentially add value for the person who can’t quite hear everything: maybe the room is disruptive or the speaker talks too fast. Or perhaps, English isn’t the first language and hearing and processing is a little slower.

In either case, having a transcript in real time is valuable. Here are a couple of options to have transcriptions of your live presentations using tools you already have.

Live Transcriptions & Closed Captions in Google Slide Presentations

Here’s an example of live transcription and closed captions in Google Slides. I even show how you could use it doing a software demo in a live presentation. I find the transcription on Google Slides is a lot faster and a bit more accurate than in PowerPoint.

Click here to view the tutorial on YouTube.

Live Transcription & Closed Captions in PowerPoint Presentations

Here’s an example of live transcription and closed captions (or subtitles) in PowerPoint. The transcription is really fast and it dynamically adjusts to be more contextual. You can also translate the transcript in real time. It’s almost magical.

Click here to view the tutorial on YouTube.

It’s probably not practical to do a live transcription for a software workshop. I think the transcription may confuse things because of the naming of features and procedural steps. But for regular presentations it seems to work really well.

I recommend putting the captions on top and make them as large as possible. This allows people in the back of the room to see them better. If they’re on the bottom they may not be visible.

Anyone use these features for your live presentations? If so, any extra tips?


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Video for learning – 15 things the research says – some may shock you…

Die heutige Begeisterung für Video, so Donald Clark, ist die eine Sache. Aber als Bildungsexperten sollten wir wissen, welche Regeln für den Video-Einsatz in Lernprozessen gelten. Unzählige wissenschaftliche Studien helfen da weiter. Einige Ergebnisse und Erfahrungen zählt Donald Clark in seinem Beitrag auf. Zum Beispiel: „Keep videos at 6 minutes or less – the less the better.“ Oder: „Should you give learners control of video? Yes.“ Und: „For subjects that are semantically rich, getting rid of the face is a good thing as it reduces cognitive load.“ Oder: „The smaller the screen the less you learn.“ 

15 Punkte. Die meisten Erkenntnisse kommen weniger überraschend als es der Titel des Beitrags andeutet. Viele Erkenntnisse müssen auch nicht absolut gelesen werden, da uns Videos heute ja nicht unmittelbar und isoliert begegnen, sondern als Bausteine von Plattformen, Webseiten, Prozessen, Aufgaben, kurz: Lernumgebungen. Trotzdem kann man natürlich vieles falsch machen.
Donald Clark, Donald Clark Plan B, 30. November 2019

Bildquelle: Charles 			</div><!-- .entry-content -->
	    
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Free Illustrations Perfect for Rise 360 Courses

free illustrations

Rise 360 is a great application to create e-learning. It’s form-based so it’s easy to use. Pull all of your instructional content together. Then go into Rise 360, select from dozens of various content blocks, and add your content.

Super easy. No programming required and because of the way it works, it doesn’t require any design work.

But what do you do if you want some graphics or illustrations to go with your Rise 360 courses?

Check out these open source illustrations from unDraw.co. They look nice and they’re free to use for commercial projects. You can download PNG or SVG versions of the illustrations.

free illustrations

Here’s why I think these free illustrations work well with Rise 360.

  • In Rise 360, you set a core accent color.

free illustrations for Rise 360

  • In unDraw, you set an accent color.

free illustrations for unDraw

  • Use the same accent colors for the Rise 360 course and the unDraw illustrations and they look like they belong together.
  • The illustrations are editable if you use an SVG editor. And because they’re open source you can customize them to your hearts desire.

Here’s an example where I matched the accent color in Rise 360 with the free illustrations from unDraw.

free illustration example

If you need some quick, easy-to-use free illustrations to complement your Rise 360 courses, then give these a try.


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A Universal Definition of Microlearning

Ich gebe es zu: Der Titel hatte mich angesprochen. Als ich gemerkt hatte, dass der Artikel nur auf ein jüngst erschienenes Buch aufmerksam machen wollte, war ich schon halb durch. Aber das Buch, „Microlearning: Short and Sweet“ von Karl M. Kapp und Robyn A. Defelice, könnte sich lohnen. Versprochen werden „learning theories and research behind microlearning“, ein Rahmenmodell mit sechs Kategorien („pensive, performance-based, persuasive, post-instruction, practice-based, preparatory/preparation“) und schließlich „guidance for creating a strategy to determine if microlearning is the right approach in any given context“. Nun ist Karl M. Kapp ein bekannter Lernexperte, der sich mit Arbeiten über den Einsatz von Games/ Gamification in Lernkontexten einen Namen gemacht hat. Für die ruhigen Tage?
Ryann Ellis, Association for Talent Development (ATD), 22. November 2019  

Lernen durch Videos – Empirische Befunde zur Gestaltung von Erklärvideos

Ich glaube, über die Popularität von Erklärvideos muss an dieser Stelle nichts mehr gesagt werden. Doch welche Merkmale von Erklärvideos wirken sich eigentlich positiv auf den Lernerfolg aus? Um diese Frage zu beantworten, haben die AutorInnen 24 Studien ausgewertet. Folgende Elemente scheinen auf den Lernerfolg einzuzahlen:

– der Einsatz interaktiver Elemente („den Lernenden wird eine aktive und individuelle Verarbeitung der Videoinhalte ermöglicht, indem die Erklärung an unterschiedliche Lerngeschwindigkeiten oder kognitive Voraussetzungen angepasst werden kann“),
– die Videoperspektive („das Video sollte aus Sicht des Erklärenden gedreht werden“),
– das Alter der erklärenden Person („Lernende scheinen älteren Erklärenden eine höhere Expertise zuzuschreiben“),
– die Videodauer („Empirische Befunde legen eine maximale Länge von sechs Minuten nahe“),
– das Design („Zudem wirkt sich die wahrgenommene Ästhetik und Nutzerfreundlichkeit des Designs auf die Emotionen, die Motivation und den Lernerfolg der Lernenden aus).

Der Beitrag führt die Elemente mit Blick auf die ausgewerteten Studien weiter aus und enthält zudem eine umfangreiche Literaturliste.
Stefanie Findeisen, Sebastian Horn und Jürgen Seifried, MedienPädagogik, 1. Oktober 2019

Bildquelle: Hermes Rivera (Unsplash)

What Makes an E-Learning Template

e-learning template header

I get lots of questions about e-learning templates. Recently, I shared some tips on how to get the most value out of a template, which I’ll build on today.

Templates make sense to speed up production and create some visual consistency. They don’t make sense if you’re doing a lot of editing and tweaking. At some point, it becomes easier to build from scratch rather than modify templates.

Many people mix and match templates, which generates many of the questions I get. Today, I’ll like to share some thoughts on what makes a template and how that impacts mixing and matching.

Most e-learning templates consist of a few core elements:

  • Fonts
  • Colors
  • Layouts
  • Design elements

E-Learning Template Fonts

Most templates consist of a header and body font. If you mix and match templates, you’ll want to make sure they use the same fonts. This works in other tools, as well. For example, if I use a Storyline block in Rise, I want the Storyline content to look like it’s part of Rise. So I’ll incorporate the same template elements. In this case, I want the fonts to match even if they use different means to manage the fonts.

e-learning template font

The same thing if I import PowerPoint slides. They use a header/body template structure, too. When you leverage existing PowerPoint content, switch the template elements to match.

E-Learning Template Color Schemes

Generally you can use as many colors as you want in a course. However, in Storyline (and PowerPoint) you get six colors. And with the five tones, that gives you thirty color swatches. You probably don’t need thirty color choices. I usually recommend two colors: a main color and a complimentary color, and perhaps a third accent color.

e-learning template colors

Regardless, when working with templates and colors, you want to be consistent in how you use them. If the main color is accent one, then do that with all templates. The challenge with already existing templates is that the template designer may have followed a different rule. Thus, when using different templates, you want to get them aligned and using colors the same way. Then, going forward, they’ll all work the way you want.

Rise 360 makes it easy as you get one accent color. However, you can also bring in other colors using the block fills and font colors. But, you’ll still want a plan as to how you’ll use colors.

E-Learning Template Layouts

There are all sorts of ways content can be laid out on the slide. Things can be up, down, left and right; and aligned at different percentages.

The key thing with layouts is that the content placeholders are the same. They don’t need to be in the same position, but they need to be the same in terms of content placeholders. When they start the same, then you can mix and match different templates and apply different looking, but similar, layouts. If they’re not the same, the inheriting template won’t know how to assign the extra content placeholders. This will require extra work to get it aligned.

e-learning template layouts

For example, the layout above has a header and three content placeholders. Applying that layout to a different slide, requires that the other slide has the same core structure of a header and three content placeholders.

Before inserting a layout from one template to the next, make sure they having matching content placeholders. If they don’t, that’s OK. You can modify the template or just know you’ll need to make some adjustments later.

E-Learning Template Design Elements

There are design elements that are unique to the templates. When I mix and match, I try to identify what makes the template visually unique outside of the things mentioned above. Then I add those elements to the other content so they have unifying characteristics.

e-learning template design elements

Here’s an example where I integrated some Storyline content into Rise, which is a completely different type of tool. One of the key elements of the template is the rounded rectangle and pill shape. I integrated some images with those shapes in Rise and the two pieces look like they belong together. You’ll notice I leveraged the colors and fonts to match, as well.

e-learning template serenity rise

Those are the four core elements that make up most templates. Before mix and matching slides from different templates, review how they use fonts, colors, and layouts. And then identify the design elements that make the template unique. Add those to the new slides where appropriate.

What template tips do you have?


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Do we still need e-learning?

Die Frage stellt E-Learning-Veteran Clive Shepherd. Doch bevor er sie im Video (10:38 Min.) beantwortet, trennt er e-learning von anderen Formen des digitalen Lernens wie Videos/ Podcasts, Collaboration/ Webinare und VR/ AR/ Simulationen und Spiele. Übrig bleibt e-learning als „interactive, self-paced instruction“. Diese Kategorisierung ist ein bisschen wackelig, aber okay … Dann fragt er mit Blick auf die letzten Jahrzehnte, wie effizient, effektiv, beliebt und erfolgreich e-learning eigentlich ist und kommt zu dem Schluss, dass bei allen Einschränkungen e-learning auch heute noch ins Bildungsportfolio gehört: „why we need e-learning in the mix“.
Clive Shepherd, Clive on Learning, 17. Oktober 2019

Bildquelle: Clive Shepherd

Integrating the Science of How We Learn into Education Technology

Es ist nur ein kurzer HBR-Artikel, deshalb darf man keine große Antworten erwarten. Stattdessen pickt sich Stephen M. Kosslyn eine wissenschaftliche Erkenntnis über das Lernen heraus: das Prinzip der „desirable difficulties“ (oder „wünschenswerten Erschwernissen“), nachdem Menschen am besten lernen, wenn – kurz gesagt – die Anforderungen nicht zu leicht, aber auch nicht zu schwer sind. Diese Erkenntnis in klassischen Lernumgebungen mit vielen Teilnehmern umzusetzen, ist schwer. Hier kann Technologie bzw. hier können Plattformen und Systeme helfen. Das Beispiel des Autors verbindet „personalized“ und „active learning“.

„Clearly, technology opens up huge opportunities to use the science of learning in new ways. To take advantage of these opportunities, we need to have clear learning outcomes, we need to measure each student’s progress in achieving those outcomes very granularly, and we need to shift to a focus on active learning.“
Stephen M. Kosslyn, Harvard Business Review, 11. Oktober 2019

Bildquelle: Randy Fath (Unsplash)

Here’s an Easy Way to Track a Video in the LMS

how to export video for LMS

Recently, I did a webinar on transforming PowerPoint content into an interactive e-learning course. One of the tips is to save your PowerPoint file as a video. Here’s why I like that tip.

Save PowerPoint as Video

Assuming the PowerPoint slides look good and the content doesn’t need to be restructured, why spend a lot of time copy and pasting from PowerPoint into a different application? Save a lot of time by outputting your PowerPoint slideshow as a video.

All of your animations, narrations, inserted media, and slide transitions remain in a single file. If all you’re doing is sharing the content, this is an easy way to go. It’s one click to create the video.

Here’s an example from the Duarte group. They built this really dynamic presentation in PowerPoint that they shared in a previous version of PowerPoint. In includes animations, narration, slide transitions, and even other video. Here’s an example of the file as a video.

Click here to view the example on YouTube.

Assuming the slides are fine and you don’t need to rework your content, saving as video is a no brainer. The challenge is how to get the video into your LMS so you can track it as a course.

How to Get the Video Into Your LMS

Articulate 360 comes with a number of great authoring tools. It also comes with Review 360 where you can upload your courses and solicit feedback from your clients and subject matter experts.

Another nice feature is that you can upload a video into Review 360. And from there, export the video for LMS. This lets you set the LMS tracking options and how to measure completion.

upload video to LMS

You’ll get a .zip file with the video and all of the LMS required files so that you can load it on the LMS and treat the video like a trackable course. Super fast and super simple.

Click here to view the tutorial on YouTube.

 


Download the fully revised, free 63-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

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2020

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Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

 

Der bildungsferne Campus

Ich habe eine Weile überlegt, wie ich diesen Artikel von Ralf Lankau, Professor für Mediengestaltung und Medientheorie an der Hochschule Offenburg, aus der FAZ einleiten bzw. zusammenfassen soll. In einigen Punkten gebe ich ihm Recht: Wenn wir über digitale Bildung, über das Digitale in Schulen oder Hochschulen sprechen, geht es immer auch um wirtschaftliche Interessen. Wie bei allen Lehr- und Lernmaterialien (und Lerninhalten, würden einige hinzufügen). Und, ja, personalisierte und adaptive Lernprozesse machen aus Lernenden noch keine mündigen, sich selbst und ihre Interessen steuernde Subjekte.

Allerdings würde ich bei Entwicklung und Einsatz innovativer, zeitgemäßer Lehr- und Lernkonzepte nicht einfach auf die Autonomie der Hochschulen, die Freiheit der Lehre und Forschung und den Bildungsföderalismus vertrauen. Das Beharrungsvermögen dieser Institutionen und Strukturen ist zu groß. Da ist mir ein offener, breit angelegter Diskurs, bei dem auch die „IT“ mitmischt, lieber.

Und die Stelle, wo Ralf Lankau im Artikel Pädagogik und IT zusammenbringt, ist mir zu wenig: „Digital- und Medienkompetenz, vom Coding bis zur vollständigen Medienproduktion, kann man, pädagogisch sinnvoll und datenschutzrechtlich gesichert, an PCs oder Laptops offline im lokalen Intranet lernen, ohne ein Bit an Schülerdaten ins Netz zu verlieren.“
Ralf Lankau, FAZ, 2. Oktober 2019

Bildquelle: Brooke Cagle (Unsplash)