Should eLearning Courses be Informative or Interactive or Both?

It is an exciting part in the world of eLearning which is full of digital trends, innovative ideas, learning techniques to make learners engaged, motivated, and stay connected with the courses. Developing eLearning courses to make learning and training programs successful is nowadays a current hot topic. eLearning courses are best known for their high…

Importance of Instructional Design in Adult Learning Theory

There is no specific area that defines instructional design. It’s an outstanding technique that makes big difference in audience lives by creating courses that motivate, inspire, and streamline the learning process. With the paradigm shift to learning level, Instructional design has synthesized neurological facts and realities of adult-learning which hit the mark every time in…

Wireframe Podcast

Wireframe Podcast

Wireframe Podcast

Here’s the trailer for the series.
https://megaphone.link/GLT1096765364

Here are a couple of the standout episodes for me.

Good Design is Good Civics

Where the hosts discuss the City of Boston’s app for reporting problems through the use of an app and the challenges of producing an app that is intuitive and easy to use and understand.
https://megaphone.link/GLT3841317779

Inclusivity is a Recipe for Good Design

In this episode, the hosts talk about closed captions and Xbox controllers and what they teach us about accessibility. I believe this is something we as eLearning designers need to think long and hard about and consider talking with the experts, the ones who need inclusive design.
https://megaphone.link/GLT2017781702

Get all the shows here.

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Was that meeting useful?

We all have them. Sometimes it seems our days are full of them. Mostly, they’re needed and occasionally they can even be useful. But are you getting the best out of a meeting?

The worst meeting is one where there’s no clear agenda or even purpose to it. Whether there are two or ten of you present, remote or actually in-person, whether it’s for a couple of minutes or a couple of hours, and whether it’s a meeting to discuss a project or a ‘general update’.

There are some things we all learn about meetings, usually from the ones we feel wasn’t time well spent or didn’t achieve what we hoped for. Here’s a few tips I (try) and employ when attending and/or requesting a meeting:

  • Model: If you believe others are not using their meetings to the best or most effective use of time, be a role model of how you will manage your meetings.
  • Agenda: Set an agenda. Even a short, informal meeting ought to have a purpose and goal. The goal could be an update to a project, to pass information on to senior/junior project member, to review or agree actions going forward, etc. but the key is to set the purpose. (see calendar). If you have time, set this ahead of the meeting. If not, then use the calendar (see below) invite to do this.
  • Audience: Only invite (see calendar) those who actually need to be there – no one needs any more unnecessary meetings in their already busy schedule. Also consider the audience availability (below) and avoid times you know might be contentious (too early, too late, too long, not long enough, conflicting meetings, etc).
  • Calendar: If you use an online calendar to arrange and plan your time then use this and send an update through. Most corporate and institutional systems will link the attendees email to their calendar and, if you’re in the same system, you’ll see their availability. (see availability). Use this invite to set not only the time and agenda but also the location, allowing all participants time to travel between buildings if necessary).
  • Availability: No one wants a meeting assigned to a time they’re not available or can’t get to. Consider the purpose (above), audience, location, etc.
  • Time: Allow time for others to have their input. If you need it arrange a second, follow-up appointment and specify when setting both appointments up that one is for the project feedback, the second is for discussion. By setting the time limit for the meeting, which can often be determined by how long you can book a room for, it can be used as a mechanism for keeping the meeting running to the agenda and avoid too much off-topic chat.
  • Formal/informal: Use your own initiative to know how formal or informal to keep the meeting. It might depend on the scale or scope of the project or subject if you prefer a formal meeting, or even line management and disciplinary issues. Informal meetings may not even need an agenda or calendar (see above), but it’s always good to have purpose and goal.
  • Roles: If possible and if the meeting requires it, assign roles for attendees in the agenda and calendar invite. This will ensure only those who need to be present are actually invited and present. Those you invite who don’t have a role, or indeed if you’re invited and aren’t assigned a roll, could quite easily push back and query the reason for the invite.
  • Notes: Whether you’re taking notes for yourself as an aide memoir or for wider dissemination, always take notes. You never know when you need to remind yourself about something that was said or decided. If it’s not your meeting then, hopefully, a set of notes will be circulated after the event, and if it is your meeting then consider circulating the notes and ask for inclusion if you’ve missed anything. If you need to share your notes, you might want to check in advance if your sketchnotes are OK for the audience?

This doesn’t even cover the online meetings we have … !

What about you, how do you plan your meetings and the meetings you attend? Do you go along with the organiser or ‘do your own thing’?

Image source: spin’n’shoot (CC BY-NC-2.0)

Incorporating Virtual Reality Content, Tools, and Devices into Learning Solutions

Incorporating Virtual Reality Content, Tools, and Devices into Learning Solutions

The concept of virtual reality dates as far back as 1938 when Antonin Artaud, a French director, and actor, referred to theater objects and characters as “la réalité virtuelle” in his essay collection called “Le Théâtre et son double”.  The English translation of this book, published in 1958 as The Theater and its Double, is the earliest published use of the term “virtual reality” (Artaud,1958).

Using Existing Content

Think about the use of existing virtual reality content in education.  Limitless possibilities await Instructional Designers/Developers.  The opportunities are there.  Instructional Designers/Developers can create learning solutions based around exploration type content that already exists. Much of this content is available free.  Imagine designing/developing learning solutions based around exploring the Smithsonian Museums in Washington, DC.  Virtual museum tours already exist such as the tour of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. These tours can be viewed using a mobile device or computer.

Let’s dive deeper and talk about tools and devices that allow users to totally immerse themselves in a 360-degree virtual reality experience.

Designing, Developing and Deploying Virtual Reality Learning Solutions Using Adobe Captivate 2019

With Adobe Captivate 2019’s built-in interactive features designing, developing and deploying realistic virtual reality situations and scenarios is a cinch.  Adobe Captivate 2019’s virtual reality capabilities can also increase productivity by decreasing the amount of time it takes to complete a VR project.  Interactive elements such as hotspots can add to learner engagement.  For more information on how to use Adobe Captivate 2019’s virtual reality features view the article “Adobe Captivate (2019 release) and Immersive learning with VR experiences” by Pooja Jaisingh (Senior Learning Evangelist) it is a helpful and insightful resource.

Popular Virtual Reality Devices for Content Playback

There are several devices on the market today that will allow playback of virtual content.  We will touch on a couple of these devices below.

Samsung’s Gear VR with Controller

In today’s world of technology, virtual reality is most recognized with products such as Samsung’s Gear VR with Controller which has a consumer cost at around $129.99 at Samsung.  When Gear VR is paired with a Smartphone such as the Galaxy S9+, Galaxy S9, Galaxy Note8 and more, the experience is awesome.  The user is immersed in a 360-degree world.  Also, the current Gear VR model weighs 0.76 lbs (without the Smartphone).  The Samsung Gear VR with Controller has been identified as a product for playing games and viewing movies.  This tool would be great to use in an exploration type learning solution as well.  There does not seem to be an educational type of package offered in any way for the Gear VR with Controller.  Google on the other hand does, so we now will take a look at Google Cardboard.

Google Cardboard

Google Cardboard is the most economical way to provide learners with that great virtual reality immersive experience.  Build your own viewer using everyday items (download the kit) or take advantage of one of Google’s certified viewers.  Just pair it with your smartphone.  Also, choose from a variety of low-cost Google viewers.  However, keep in mind that purchasing kit bundles such as Google’s Expeditions kits come at a high price.  The kits are priced according to the number of registered students. For example, at Best Buy kits range in prices between $4,750.99 and $10,499.99.  Also, there is the Google Daydream View Headset which we will not go into the details of in this article.

References and Resources:

Antonin Artaud (1958), The Theatre and its Double Trans., Mary Caroline Richards. (New York: Grove Weidenfeld, 1958).

Google Cardboard, Get your Cardboard. Retrieved from https://vr.google.com/cardboard/get-cardboard/

Pooja Jaisingh (2018), Adobe Captivate (2019 release) and Immersive learning with VR experiences, Published August 22, 2018.  Article retrieved from https://elearning.adobe.com/2018/08/adobe-captivate-2019-release-and-immersive-learning-with-vr-experiences/?sdid=LLVYTFD5&mv=display

Samsung, Samsung’s Gear VR with Controller, Information retrieved from https://www.samsung.com/us/mobile/virtual-reality/gear-vr/gear-vr-with-controller–galaxy-note8-edition–sm-r325nzvaxar/

Smithsonian Museum, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Tour, Retrieved from http://naturalhistory.si.edu/VT3/

Smithsonian Museums in Washington, DC, Retrieved from https://washington.org/smithsonian-institution-museums?gclid=CMPC3viYnM4CFUFbhgodZ50Bhg

Photo:

Article Photo by Bradley Hook from Pexels, Retrieved from Pexels.com at https://www.pexels.com/photo/sea-landscape-nature-sky-123318/

Wikipedia, Antonin Artaud., Article retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonin_Artaud

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Present the Perfect Design Portfolio at Your Job Interview (Video Included)

If you work in learning and development, you have an automatic advantage walking into any job interview. Why? You know how to tell a story. You tell a story every time you step in front of a class, develop an e-learning course, or work in instructional design.

A job interview is just another story. You’re telling your prospective client or employer what you’ve done in the past, keeping in mind which details are going to be most important to them. You focus on the plot points most interesting to your interviewer. And you bring a portfolio that is a visual representation of your story.

Here are some tips to help you assemble your design portfolio:

Your design samples are not the main focus of your job interview. You are. Know your background and know what kind of story you want to share. Think of your portfolio as a prop.

The secret to an amazing design portfolio is simple. Keep everything you work on. At least, anything that shows your current level of skill and reflects your true value. Each time you prepare for a job interview, sift through your design samples and decide which pieces emphasize the most relevant plot points in your story.

Learn about the organization that is interviewing you. Know their branding, the scope of the project you are being hired for, and try to understand what they most value. For example, is the project on a tight budget? Is the organization cutting edge and willing to spend extra time and money for creativity? Bring design samples to the interview that will allow you to talk about your past efficiency, or your amazing creative efforts.

Bring more design samples than you need. More samples make for a more impressive portfolio.

Organize your design portfolio so you can lay it out quickly in front of the client or employer. Here is what I use to organize everything. Spread out the samples. Take at least half of the table. Encourage your interviewer to pick items up and look them over. Let the client or employer wander through your portfolio and pick up what is most interesting to them. Tell your interviewer the story of whatever pieces they pick up. Don’t be afraid to guide the interviewer to particular pieces and explain why you feel those samples are relevant to what they hope to accomplish with you.

In the past, have you produced confidential or proprietary content? Figure out what you are legally allowed to include in your portfolio. Your design portfolio is evidence of your skills. Even if you can’t show a full course or a high quality print of a final product, show what you are allowed to show, tell the interviewer that the sample is a fragment or a low res copy if that’s the case, and still use that sample to breathe life into your story.

What if you didn’t do all of the work on a design you’re showing? Just tell the interviewer and explain your role. Sometimes I show visuals I didn’t personally design. Why? Because they’re associated with training programs or curricula I developed. I tell the prospective client or employer that I didn’t design the poster they’re holding, but it was part of XYZ Training Program I created. I’m establishing credibility by showing my interviewer proof that I really developed that training program. They’re holding a piece of it.

If you haven’t been working as a designer or developer long enough to have lots of client work, feel free to create your own samples branded in the style of a specific company. You can even create examples using the branding of the organization that is interviewing you. Just be sure to tell your interviewer that you created the samples for personal development rather than for a client, if that is the case.

I used to work in retail L&D, and they say that if you can get a customer to pick up a product, there’s a significant chance they will buy it. You can apply that concept to your design portfolio. Go to the job interview prepared to hand your work to a prospective client and tell them who you are as a designer or developer. Good luck!

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Articulate Storyline 3 – Wide Variety of Interactive Templates to Make Content Development Easier

We release the next set of Articulate Storyline ready-to-use interactive templates to help budding developers and instructional designer. Click on each image to view the template details. 01. Tab Interaction- 056 The Tab interaction template helps in presenting related contents on a single slide. This makes navigation through the contents an easy task for the…

5 Productive Content Centered Templates to Simplify Your Work Day

We release the next set of Articulate Storyline ready-to-use templates to help budding developers and instructional designer. Click on each image to get template details. Text and graphic template- 01 This attractive template with unique presentation of content make learning process easy and effective. Though the template has simplistic design, yet very attractive and has an…

Articulate Storyline Interactive Quiz Templates

Collection of eLearning templates to help budding developers and instructional designer. Click on images to get template details. Quiz-003 Multiple Text Entry This Articulate Storyline quiz template has used a Text entry question type template. The template has an absolutely simplistic design yet the template is quite eye-catching. The interface appears to have a table…

How to turn the staff training to contribute in the goals of an organization?

 

Every business will have their own goals to achieve and they make every possible effort to accomplish these goals effectively and efficiently. A very common goal that we find in most of the product/ service based companies is, providing an effective on-job training to up skill the staff. The best approach to meet the training goal is to establish direct connection between business goals and training.

In this blog we will discuss how we can connect business goals with training outcomes i.e. learning objectives?

Organizations should adopt a Top-down approach to reap maximum benefits out of their training efforts. The business goals should guide to define the skill sets and knowledge it requires in workforce.

But this transition is not simple as it appears to be. Generally, the business goals are defined in broader perspective and in different parameters – something which are defined in terms of monetary, market-share, technological advancements. These are quite different than an individual’s achievements as training outcomes.

This means,

“The broader organizational goals should be converted into learnable as well as measurable individual achievements – in terms of specific knowledge and skill sets that enable an individual (a human resource) to achieve broader goals of an organization”

Turn Business Goals into Learning Objectives

Learning and Development (L & D) professionals or Instructional Designers are responsible to align aims of learning with business needs.

Step 1 – Analysis: Analyze the business needs and workforce current capabilities

The business goals may not be described in measurable terms, but they must be put-in using plain and specific terminology that describes those best.

Sample business goal areas are as follows:

  • Increasing market share to ____% in 6 months
  • Lowering production cost to ___% in 12 months
  • Increase marketing team to ____ numbers in 3 months
  • Improve customer service with not more than 10% of tolerance in failing to fix complaints on-time

Against to these business goals, check the current capabilities of the corresponding workforce. This is to identify the gap between what is the current competency and what is required to meet these goals. List down all the gaps in accordance with their priority to meet respective business goals.

Step 2 – Define: Break broader business goals into specific and measurable learning objectives

Define all the gaps using specific and measurable terms such as Bloom’s verbs. Each gap may require multiple skills and knowledge areas, so list down the learning objectives as many as required to achieve business goals fully and effectively.

For example,

Business Goal: Improve customer service with not more than 10% of tolerance in failing to fix complaints on-time

Identified Gaps:

  • Customer care executives are not completely aware of the product features that company sells.
  • Customer care executives are not able to describe product features as mentioned in product manuals.

Learning Objectives:

  • List the product features as they are in the user manual supplied with the product.
  • Explain features using the terminology used in corresponding product technical manuals.

Conclusion

In step 2, you must have noticed how the business goal is transformed into learning objectives. The effectiveness of these transformation lies on the ability of L & D professional. After we develop learning objectives, we need to evaluate them; and the best approach is to develop sample content for each objective and check whether it is relevant in achieving the corresponding business goals.

Swift eLearning Services Pvt. Ltd. is one of the best eLearning companies in India helping organizations achieve their business endeavors using our custom eLearning solutions for workforce training.

Source link: http://www.swiftelearningservices.com/how-to-turn-the-staff-training-to-contribute-in-the-goals-of-an-organization/

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