The Complete Learning Technologist Certificate – Coming to Orlando in February!

I’ve wanted to put together a learning technologist certification for a long, long time. Well, guess who had the same idea – Training Magazine! And they’re making it happen at Training 2019! Learning geeks will unite in Orlando for our three-day learning technology program February 22-24, 2019. You can register here.

  • Day 1: Creation and Authoring Learning Tools, presented by Jeff Batt
  • Day 2: Multimedia Planning, Tools and Gadgets, presented by Nick Floro
  • Day 3: Delivery and Emerging Technologies, presented by yours truly

I’m going to cover a variety of technologies on day three, in addition to discussing how to select and implement educational technology. And I’ll give you some free goodies to take home with you. Take a look at the program descriptions below and consider joining us at Disney’s Coronado Springs Resort!

The Complete Learning Technologist Certificate Program

Whether you are a designer, developer, manager, facilitator, administrator, or executive, you need to understand what learning technologies are capable of today—and what their promise is for tomorrow. Through demos, hands-on experience, checklists, and rubrics, this program goes beyond identifying the latest shiny training tech objects — and helps you become a well-rounded learning technologist who makes the optimal selection, design, and implementation decisions for your organization.

Day 1 Creation and Authoring Learning Tools; Jeff Batt, Head Trainer, Learning Dojo

Authoring tools change quickly and often, so how do you keep up? We’ll begin by examining the overall principles of development (i.e., elements, properties, behavior). Then, using those principles, we’ll begin our exploration of specific authoring tools. You’ll learn:

  • About the basics of course authoring, regardless of what authoring tool you may be using.
  • How development principles apply to current off-the-shelf tools like Adobe Captivate and more.
  • How to make the appropriate selection for authoring tools.
  • How to learn any new authoring tool.

Day 2: Multimedia Planning, Tools and Gadgets; Nick Floro, Learning Architect, Sealworks Interactive Studios

Looking to bring your skills to the next level? On day two, you will learn how to get started building and designing interactive learning. Learn the finer points, practical skills that you can apply, and best practices for delivering engaging learning. You’ll learn about:

  • Architecting your next project with collaborative tools.
  • Sketching a storyboard from paper to PowerPoint.
  • Improving brainstorming and feedback loops.
  • Creating a prototype with Marvel app.
  • Using Explain Everything App to create animated explainers and promos and to provide feedback.
  • Thinking Outside the Box: 5 activities and concepts to add to your next project.
  • Building an interactive chatbot for learning.
  • Strategies for designing for learning and your audience.

Day 3: Delivery and Emerging Technologies; Katrina Marie Baker, Senior Learning Evangelist, Adobe

You’ve spent two days learning how to create engaging training resources. Day three focuses on how to deliver your content using the latest in learning technology and features content from Katrina’s books LMS Success and The LMS Selection Checklist. You will:

  • Define common types of learning technology platforms.
  • Demonstrate how technology can help you engage learners through the use of gamification, mobile learning, social learning, and blended learning elements.
  • Explain how to use reporting and analytics to understand the learner experience.
  • Describe the process to select a new technology platform, including the features and factors you should review with potential vendors.
  • Discuss the process of successfully implementing and maintaining a learning technology platform.
  • Cover best practices that include how to internally market your platform, curate your course catalog and content, and build an effective administrator team.

BONUS! You will walk away with supplemental materials and a free trial of Adobe Captivate Prime.

BYOD:  Please bring a WiFi-enabled laptop with Storyline and Captivate installed (trial versions okay).

The post The Complete Learning Technologist Certificate – Coming to Orlando in February! appeared first on eLearning.

Implementing Video-Based Learning Strategy Effectively In Corporate Learning

With the rising popularity of videos, even corporates are leveraging on using them for educating their employees. Videos can be human based or animated. How exactly video-based learning should be implemented is the focus of this article.

Introduction

Video-based learning is a powerful and effective method of learning new concepts. When implemented correctly, video-based learning solution has the right impact on the minds of the learners. Videos have the power to captivate, entice, and educate learners. Rightly built video-based learning snippets, meaning right sized videos with appealing graphics, visuals and narration help the audience connect well to the subject being taught and lead to better decision making.

Video-based learning in corporate learning improves the retention of concepts due to their appeal and in turn improve productivity of employees Organizations reap several benefits when they implement videos to announce new products or teach innovation and cutting-edge concepts.

Why Videos?

The popularity of videos on social media platforms or vlogging platforms cannot be overemphasized. Music videos have garnered billions of views in YouTube. Many professional and amateurs use YouTube to teach and entertain their audiences. In social media platforms, videos have time and again proven to be the method to “break the internet”.

Video-based learning nuggets if built carefully and that have the right elements like interesting narration, graphic elements can hold the attention of a learner for longer duration of time.

Create better learning experiences using video-based learning

Videos help organizations to communicate important messages to their audiences. There are majorly two types of videos, tutor/instructor based (human) and animated videos. In the former, the strategy and script needs to be crafted and given to the tutors to enact and shoot as well as record the video. On the other hand, the animated videos are created basis the scripts and visualization. Some use green screens to record the speech of the tutor and then add the background elements during the editing process.

Video-based learning add value to their existing learning solutions and lead to performance enhancements.

Videos are powerful methods of communicating important new announcements related to the product and company policies and change management. Video-based learning nuggets can be developed using motion graphics, white board animation, kinetic text animation and so on.

Engaging videos leading to action and implementation

When developing videos, we should ask ourselves, “will this solution lead to better learning outcomes?”, “will this video lead the audience to take concrete action?”, or “will this video empower the learner to make better choices?”. It is important to focus on the actions that learners will perform while taking the video-based learning tutorial. The focus is both on the visuals and the text that delivers the message. This approach helps learners perform better.

Some useful stats point to the usage of videos at workplace.

Workforce Inclines More to Videos

“Employees are 75% more likely to watch a video than open an email or read documents.”

– Forrester Research

Benefit of videos

Better retention of concepts

Video-based learning help the learners remember the concepts well if they are crafted well and have the right mix of animation and text elements.

Better impact leading to better productivity

Learners benefit from videos and use the new learning to improve their performance and thus leading to better productivity. Organizations are pleased if the business goals and learning outcomes are met for the monies spent on the solution.

Having said this, lets look at a case study of successful implementation of video-based learning.

Case study: Innovation message

The customer was looking for a short video to announce as well as briefly explain the various steps that the organization was taking to implement innovative practices across verticals and departments. They wanted us to create the video with highly impactful visuals that would go well with the core message being sent. We brainstormed and came up with mock-ups which were then approved for producing the high-quality video. The customer said the implementation was accepted well and was successful in spreading awareness across the organization on the various innovations.

Case study: Understanding Drug Discovery Process

The customer wanted to roll out video-based learning nuggets across organization on the concept of timelines of drug-discovery as they wanted to sensitize their audience about the need for sometimes longer duration of discovery-test-adoption. The video-based learning was a prelude to the actual course on drug discovery which had interesting activities.

Conclusion

Videos have time and again proved to be effective in communicating important messages, concepts and ideas to the workforce. We believe videos can help engage audiences to learn and understand the concepts better.

Suggested Reading

The post Implementing Video-Based Learning Strategy Effectively In Corporate Learning appeared first on eLearning.

Learning Thursday #1: Mobile Technologies in Education

We’re almost to the new year, so I figure I’ll start a new blog post series.    I’m going to put out a new learning and development article every other week that has a unique perspective.  I’ll also post some discussion points for those who would like to reflect on the article.  If you’d like to participate, please follow me here on the Adobe eLearning blog and comment on our first article:

Vavoula, G., Sharples, M., Lonsdale, P., Rudman, P., & Meek, J. (2007). Learning bridges: Mobile technologies in education. Educational Technology, 47(3), 33–37. Google Scholar

(The Google Scholar link will take you to JSTOR, where you can read this article for free.)

Abstract: MyArtSpace is a service for children to spread their learning between schools and museums using mobile phones linked to a personal Web space. Using MyArtSpace as an example, the authors discuss the possibilities for mobile technology to form bridges between formal and informal learning. They also offer guidelines for designing such bridges.

Please add a comment with your thoughts on one (or both) of these questions:

  1. Have you seen a learning experience in the corporate world that is similar to the MyArtSpace experience discussed in the article?
  2. Can you think of an environment other than a museum where this sort of learning experience would be effective?

The post Learning Thursday #1: Mobile Technologies in Education appeared first on eLearning.

Trends in Training & Learning Management (Includes Webinar Recording & Slides)

On November 21, I facilitated a discussion of major trends in learning and development.  Fun and data was had by all, thanks to our awesome audience from around the world!

If you would like to check out the full session recording, click here.  The description is below.  And here are the slides:

Join Adobe’s Senior Learning Evangelist Katrina Marie Baker for this lively conversation about the latest trends in training & development. Based on recent studies and research, the session will explore what people are doing in organizations around the world, and how organizations can achieve great results with modern learning programs.

Katrina will discuss the:

  • Impetus behind creating and developing virtual universities
  • Growing demand to encourage learner immersion and ongoing engagement
  • Rise of mobile learning
  • Role of skill-based learning in business training
  • Use of gamification for learner engagement and motivation
  • Ongoing expectations of learners for video
  • Proving the value of your learning program through more relevant reporting

The post Trends in Training & Learning Management (Includes Webinar Recording & Slides) appeared first on eLearning.

Task List for Your Learning Management System (LMS) Implementation

***If you’d like to attend a free webinar on how to implement your LMS, join me tomorrow!***

Quite a few of us hear the words “learning management system implementation” and run for the hills. It’s natural to be afraid of taking on a project that is totally outside of your normal, everyday function. No need to worry – implementing an LMS is absolutely something you can do.

The most critical part of any LMS implementation is your project plan. Make sure you have a basic understanding of LMS administration. Break your implementation into individual tasks, and assign timelines and responsible parties. Work closely with your LMS vendor. They often provide a partial timeline you can use as a starting point. (In the case of Adobe Captivate Prime, you work through tasks with an LMS customer success manager.)

Down below, I’ve provided a list of implementation tasks from my book, LMS Success. Depending on the organization, some of these tasks will be very important, and others won’t apply. Pull the appropriate tasks into Excel or Project, assign start and end dates for each task, and determine who will be responsible for its completion.  (Those who purchase LMS Success or The LMS Selection Checklist get a bundle of supplementary resources, including an Excel workbook of implementation tasks.)

You may want to further divide some tasks into smaller pieces, or create workflows. It depends on the project size and how complex your implementation will be. You can also group tasks by dividing your implementation into five phases, like this:

1: Before vendor is selected  |  2: After vendor is selected  |  3: During contract negotiations  |  4: Before go-live  |  5: After go-live

The task list below is a starting point – not a prescribed plan.  I’ve led or consulted on 30+ implementations, and I change the task list every time.  Also note that some tasks do not directly pertain to the LMS. Many organizations take their LMS implementation as an opportunity to restructure their training department, so you’ll see some of those elements as well.

© Katrina Marie Baker, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from the author is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be used, provided that full credit is given to Katrina Marie Baker with specific direction to LMS Success.

In order to assign compliance and other critical courses in the new LMS…

  1. Create a list of compliance courses required of all personnel.
  2. Create a list of compliance courses required for specific regions or countries.
  3. Create a list of compliance courses required for specific personnel.
  4. For all compliance courses – is completion required one time or on a recurring basis?
  5. Standardize classes provided to new hires.
  6. Create a list reflecting courses, personnel to receive them, and whether courses should be automatically assigned based on a set of rules (assuming your LMS does this).
  7. Do you want a standard group of courses to be pushed to personnel on their hire date? Or three months after they’ve joined? Or every year during their employment?
  8. Should compliance courses be maintained in paper formats as an alternative, in case of a system failure?

To assemble your course catalog…

  1. Are there any courses in your current LMS that should not be transferred to the new LMS?
  2. Determine names for all course categories and subcategories.
  3. Compare existing courses and determine which are similar enough to be merged when you migrate to the new LMS. (Many organizations have courses that have been added multiple times to their LMS. Might as well clean that up.)
  4. Mark corporate events and other non-training courses in the course catalog spreadsheet so they can be categorized appropriately and/or eliminated. (A lot of organizations use their LMS as an event management system. This can really clutter your course catalog.)
  5. Correct categories, subcategories, delivery, and course unit types for all courses, on a spreadsheet.
  6. Determine course catalog import structure. (Ask your new LMS vendor about this.)
  7. Should courses in all languages be displayed in the same catalog? In multiple catalogs?
  8. Assign college levels (100 level, 200 level, and so on) so curricula are assigned in an appropriate order.

Some general administrative tasks (in addition to those provided by your LMS vendor)…

  1. Decide how many administrator levels are needed, with associated permissions. (Questions about how to do this or any other tasks? Just comment below.)
  2. Create a list of tasks each level of administrator will complete.
  3. Decide on lead administrators for each department, if your organization is large.
  4. Determine a “regular chores” list for administrators.
  5. Create an LMS support email address that routes to the correct admins.
  6. Will IT have any administrator role in the new LMS?
  7. Determine what inbound/outbound system feeds need to run to the LMS. Maybe your HRIS?
  8. Decide on a go-live date for the LMS.
  9. Discuss GDPR and ADA 508 compliance.
  10. Run test batch import of all data types, such as course history, user information, and so on. (Ask your LMS vendor for advice.)
  11. After running successful test batches, import all data. Test to confirm success.
  12. Discuss whether interface should be offered in multiple languages.
  13. Create course equivalencies.
  14. Exploration of the benefits of xAPI, and how it can be effectively introduced.
  15. Get administrator tip sheets from vendor, if possible.
  16. Discuss how to utilize assessments and surveys more effectively.
  17. Schedule super administrator training with new LMS vendor.
  18. Explore security features and any national or international regulations pertaining to the data in your LMS.
  19. Negotiate contract.
  20. Negotiate SLA.
  21. Decide when to cut over from your old LMS to the new LMS.
  22. Communicate that cut-over plan to your end users.
  23. Decide on the URL for the new LMS.
  24. Replace links to the old LMS with links to the new one.
  25. Train administrators on new system processes.
  26. Begin weekly recorded webinars on LMS administration targeted for different admin levels.
  27. Begin bi-weekly LMS “office hours,” to assist your LMS administrators with data entry and basic questions.
  28. Develop how-to videos for common LMS user/administrator tasks.
  29. Evaluate your organization’s training data entry procedure and streamline it. (Make sure your trainers track their classroom sessions and attendees in the LMS.)
  30. Test user interface prior to go-live. (Have lots of people test it. Try to break it.)
  31. Test class scheduling functionality.
  32. Test learning tracks or paths, and reports.
  33. Test upload of courses.
  34. Test EVERYTHING.
  35. Allow extra time to troubleshoot.
  36. Run a test of the system backup, if there is one.
  37. Run a test upgrade.
  38. System FAQ documents for members of your IT department as well as end users. (Definitely explain how to reset a user password, if passwords are required!)
  39. Review current third-party course vendors. Are they cost-effective?

Marketing and design tasks…

  1. Determine a name for the new LMS.
  2. Create an LMS logo.
  3. Determine a multi-tier marketing plan for different employee levels.
  4. Draft the look of the user interface.
  5. Add gamification elements, if needed.
  6. Create an LMS introductory video, emails, or posters to help you internally market the system.

What tasks would you add to this list?  Comment below!  Connect with me on Twitter or LinkedIn.

© Katrina Marie Baker, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from the author is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be used, provided that full credit is given to Katrina Baker with specific direction to LMS Success.

The post Task List for Your Learning Management System (LMS) Implementation appeared first on eLearning.

Task List for Your Learning Management System (LMS) Implementation

***If you’d like to attend a free webinar on how to implement your LMS, join me tomorrow!***

Quite a few of us hear the words “learning management system implementation” and run for the hills. It’s natural to be afraid of taking on a project that is totally outside of your normal, everyday function. No need to worry – implementing an LMS is absolutely something you can do.

The most critical part of any LMS implementation is your project plan. Make sure you have a basic understanding of LMS administration. Break your implementation into individual tasks, and assign timelines and responsible parties. Work closely with your LMS vendor. They often provide a partial timeline you can use as a starting point. (In the case of Adobe Captivate Prime, you work through tasks with an LMS customer success manager.)

Down below, I’ve provided a list of implementation tasks from my book, LMS Success. Depending on the organization, some of these tasks will be very important, and others won’t apply. Pull the appropriate tasks into Excel or Project, assign start and end dates for each task, and determine who will be responsible for its completion.  (Those who purchase LMS Success or The LMS Selection Checklist get a bundle of supplementary resources, including an Excel workbook of implementation tasks.)

You may want to further divide some tasks into smaller pieces, or create workflows. It depends on the project size and how complex your implementation will be. You can also group tasks by dividing your implementation into five phases, like this:

1: Before vendor is selected  |  2: After vendor is selected  |  3: During contract negotiations  |  4: Before go-live  |  5: After go-live

The task list below is a starting point – not a prescribed plan.  I’ve led or consulted on 30+ implementations, and I change the task list every time.  Also note that some tasks do not directly pertain to the LMS. Many organizations take their LMS implementation as an opportunity to restructure their training department, so you’ll see some of those elements as well.

© Katrina Marie Baker, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from the author is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be used, provided that full credit is given to Katrina Marie Baker with specific direction to LMS Success.

In order to assign compliance and other critical courses in the new LMS…

  1. Create a list of compliance courses required of all personnel.
  2. Create a list of compliance courses required for specific regions or countries.
  3. Create a list of compliance courses required for specific personnel.
  4. For all compliance courses – is completion required one time or on a recurring basis?
  5. Standardize classes provided to new hires.
  6. Create a list reflecting courses, personnel to receive them, and whether courses should be automatically assigned based on a set of rules (assuming your LMS does this).
  7. Do you want a standard group of courses to be pushed to personnel on their hire date? Or three months after they’ve joined? Or every year during their employment?
  8. Should compliance courses be maintained in paper formats as an alternative, in case of a system failure?

To assemble your course catalog…

  1. Are there any courses in your current LMS that should not be transferred to the new LMS?
  2. Determine names for all course categories and subcategories.
  3. Compare existing courses and determine which are similar enough to be merged when you migrate to the new LMS. (Many organizations have courses that have been added multiple times to their LMS. Might as well clean that up.)
  4. Mark corporate events and other non-training courses in the course catalog spreadsheet so they can be categorized appropriately and/or eliminated. (A lot of organizations use their LMS as an event management system. This can really clutter your course catalog.)
  5. Correct categories, subcategories, delivery, and course unit types for all courses, on a spreadsheet.
  6. Determine course catalog import structure. (Ask your new LMS vendor about this.)
  7. Should courses in all languages be displayed in the same catalog? In multiple catalogs?
  8. Assign college levels (100 level, 200 level, and so on) so curricula are assigned in an appropriate order.

Some general administrative tasks (in addition to those provided by your LMS vendor)…

  1. Decide how many administrator levels are needed, with associated permissions. (Questions about how to do this or any other tasks? Just comment below.)
  2. Create a list of tasks each level of administrator will complete.
  3. Decide on lead administrators for each department, if your organization is large.
  4. Determine a “regular chores” list for administrators.
  5. Create an LMS support email address that routes to the correct admins.
  6. Will IT have any administrator role in the new LMS?
  7. Determine what inbound/outbound system feeds need to run to the LMS. Maybe your HRIS?
  8. Decide on a go-live date for the LMS.
  9. Discuss GDPR and ADA 508 compliance.
  10. Run test batch import of all data types, such as course history, user information, and so on. (Ask your LMS vendor for advice.)
  11. After running successful test batches, import all data. Test to confirm success.
  12. Discuss whether interface should be offered in multiple languages.
  13. Create course equivalencies.
  14. Exploration of the benefits of xAPI, and how it can be effectively introduced.
  15. Get administrator tip sheets from vendor, if possible.
  16. Discuss how to utilize assessments and surveys more effectively.
  17. Schedule super administrator training with new LMS vendor.
  18. Explore security features and any national or international regulations pertaining to the data in your LMS.
  19. Negotiate contract.
  20. Negotiate SLA.
  21. Decide when to cut over from your old LMS to the new LMS.
  22. Communicate that cut-over plan to your end users.
  23. Decide on the URL for the new LMS.
  24. Replace links to the old LMS with links to the new one.
  25. Train administrators on new system processes.
  26. Begin weekly recorded webinars on LMS administration targeted for different admin levels.
  27. Begin bi-weekly LMS “office hours,” to assist your LMS administrators with data entry and basic questions.
  28. Develop how-to videos for common LMS user/administrator tasks.
  29. Evaluate your organization’s training data entry procedure and streamline it. (Make sure your trainers track their classroom sessions and attendees in the LMS.)
  30. Test user interface prior to go-live. (Have lots of people test it. Try to break it.)
  31. Test class scheduling functionality.
  32. Test learning tracks or paths, and reports.
  33. Test upload of courses.
  34. Test EVERYTHING.
  35. Allow extra time to troubleshoot.
  36. Run a test of the system backup, if there is one.
  37. Run a test upgrade.
  38. System FAQ documents for members of your IT department as well as end users. (Definitely explain how to reset a user password, if passwords are required!)
  39. Review current third-party course vendors. Are they cost-effective?

Marketing and design tasks…

  1. Determine a name for the new LMS.
  2. Create an LMS logo.
  3. Determine a multi-tier marketing plan for different employee levels.
  4. Draft the look of the user interface.
  5. Add gamification elements, if needed.
  6. Create an LMS introductory video, emails, or posters to help you internally market the system.

What tasks would you add to this list?  Comment below!  Connect with me on Twitter or LinkedIn.

© Katrina Marie Baker, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from the author is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be used, provided that full credit is given to Katrina Baker with specific direction to LMS Success.

The post Task List for Your Learning Management System (LMS) Implementation appeared first on eLearning.

10 Awesome Ways To Use Mobile Learning For Employee Training

Mobile learning for employee training is fast becoming an essential part of training delivery. In this article, I share 10 ways to showcase how you can use mobile learning for employee training for formal training and Performance Support (job aids).

How To Use Mobile Learning For Employee Training

The usage of mobile learning began in earnest a decade ago, and this was essentially to complement or support traditional eLearning. Over the last few years, the adoption of mobile learning for employee training has been on a steady increase. In fact, it is a crucial and often a significant part of an organization’s training delivery today.

What Is Mobile Learning, And What Are The Key Benefits It Offers For Employee Training?

Mobile learning refers to training that is available to the learners on mobile devices giving them the flexibility to learn anytime, anywhere, on the go, and on the device of their choice. They are typically designed to allow learners to use the same course across devices (multi-device support that provides access to courses across laptops/desktops to tablets/smartphones).

Mobile learning for employee training addresses the changing expectations of learners on how they want to learn. It also aligns well to the needs of the changing composition of the workforce (that now includes Millennials).

It is also able to leverage on the high impact microlearning formats that make the learning bite-sized and easily digestible. You can also leverage immersive approaches like gamification, videos, and interactive videos, and mobile apps for learning to multiply its impact.

The reason mobile learning for employee training is becoming a “must-have” approach from a “good-to-have” approach is on account of several benefits it offers. The key benefits being:

  1. A learner-centric approach: It provides the required control to the learners to take the training when they want, on the go, and on the device of their choice.
  2. It offers higher learner engagement.
  3. It can be used effectively to push for a higher application of acquired learning.
  4. It leads to better completion rates.
  5. It creates a learning pathway that encourages learners to keep coming back (focuses on facilitating a “pull” vs “push” of the traditional training delivery).
  6. It leverages on social or collaborative learning.
  7. It can be used to offer formal training, Performance Support (job aids), and support for ILT.

What Are The Key Triggers That Are Creating An Increased Adoption Of Mobile Learning For Employee Training?

Let me outline some of the significant aspects, such as the fact that the adoption of mobile learning for employee training is increasing.

Mobile learning for employee training is finding a wider application. Today, mobile learning is being used to provide:

  1. Formal training (particularly, in a learning path featuring micro learning).
  2. Performance Support intervention through job aids (within the learners’ workflow and to provide the required support at the moment of their need).
  3. Support to Instructor Led Training or ILT.

Mobile learning for employee training is being used to address varied corporate training needs. As I have highlighted, mobile learning is now a mainstay approach for online training delivery. It is used to address corporate training needs that include:

  1. Induction and on boarding.
  2. Soft skills training.
  3. Professional skills training.
  4. Product training.
  5. Sales training.
  6. Leadership training.

This is not all. It is also finding the adoption for:

  1. Compliance training.
  2. Application simulations training.

Mobile learning for employee training is slowly transitioning from mobile-friendly to mobile-first. With the maturing of authoring tools to create engaging and immersive learning experiences that are optimized for the consumption of content on mobile devices, mobile learning for employee training is undergoing a significant shift.

  • While the previous avatar of mobile learning offered multi-device support (learners could seamlessly work across laptops/desktops and tablets/smartphones), this approach was adaptive or mobile friendly.
  • In contrast, mobile learning for employee training is now completely responsive or a mobile-first approach that features learning designs and interactions that are optimized for smartphones.

10 Ways To Use Mobile Learning For Employee Training

At EI Design, we have a large mobile learning solutions practice. We had set up this practice in 2011, and to date, we have created nearly 2,000 hours of mobile learning content for employee training.

From our huge repository, I showcase 10 ways that illustrate how you can use mobile learning for employee training and meet the required mandate across varied corporate training needs. The showcased examples reflect how you can use mobile learning for both formal training, as well as to offer Performance Support intervention (through job aids).

Mobile Learning For Employee Training – Formal Training

1. Compliance training: This was a course on Insider Trading, where we used a gamification approach to create an immersive experience using Lectora Inspire 17 as a tool to create the multi-device experience.

Formal Training - Compliance Training
Formal Training - Compliance Training

2. Induction and onboarding training: The exploration for this induction course was open-form. Learners were allowed to explore in a non-linear fashion across different institutional and operational facets. It also included engaging graphics, narratives, and simple content supported by engrossing interactivities with mobile device compatibility. It also offers a quick turnaround time without losing the visual punch.

Formal Training - Induction and Onboarding Training
Formal Training - Induction and Onboarding Training

3. Application simulations training: This was an application simulation training on the use of Salesforce software. To make the understanding of complex simulations easier, we created a step-by-step interactive simulation. This was done using Articulate Storyline 360 and was made mobile friendly for wider reach to the sales staff.

Formal Training – Application Simulations Training
Formal Training – Application Simulations Training

4. Soft skills training: This was a course on conflict management – a very crucial skill especially for managers. We used a decision-making scenario to drive the complete learning. Built using our custom HTML5 framework, this was made completely responsive to all devices.

Formal Training – Soft Skills Training
Formal Training – Soft Skills Training

5. Product training: We used gamification to make the content more engaging in this course. Since this was a large course, it was important to keep the learner busy and hooked. We used scenarios, gamification, and simulations to raise the engagement factor and made it available on mobile devices for the learner to access the modules anytime.

Formal Training – Product Training
Formal Training – Product Training

6. Sales training: Sales training is always challenging and fun to design and build, since it provides opportunities to make the content come to life using characters, conversations, scenarios, animations etc. That is exactly what we did here to train new sales managers on sales development. We used our custom HTML5 framework and made the course responsive to all devices.

Formal Training – Sales Training
Formal Training – Sales Training

Mobile Learning For Employee Training – For Performance Support (Job Aids/Learning Aids)

1.  Compliance training: This was a precursor course to a larger course on data security and privacy. This was created in the format of a parallax website with relevant elements popping into the screen as the user journeyed through the short nugget. This was done using custom HTML5 and is responsive to all devices.

Performance Support – Compliance Training Performance Support – Compliance Training

2. Induction and onboarding training: We created an immersive learning experience using the 360-degree imagery to explain to new joinees about how our company functions, our mission and vision, our teams etc. The joinee could explore the complete office virtually and click on hotspots (within the 360-degree imagery) to learn how each domain contributes to the organizational goals.

Performance Support – Induction and Onboarding Training
Performance Support – Induction and Onboarding Training

3. Soft skills training: This was a communication and customer experience training module for all employees of a company. We used microlearning to break down the content into small, relevant, manageable sections for the learner and made it available on all devices, but mainly targeted for mobile devices using our custom HTML5 framework.

Performance Support – Soft Skills TrainingPerformance Support – Soft Skills Training Performance Support – Soft Skills Training Performance Support – Soft Skills Training

4. Sales training: We created an HTML5-based responsive website for a sales framework training for sales agents for a farm products company. This website served as a learner guide for the 8-week long training program.

Performance Support – Sales Training
Performance Support – Sales Training

Source: https://www.eidesign.net/10-awesome-ways-to-use-mobile-learning-for-employee-training/

The post 10 Awesome Ways To Use Mobile Learning For Employee Training appeared first on eLearning.

Free Webinar: Successfully Implement Your Learning Management System (LMS)

I’m doing a free virtual session on November 29 for anyone implementing a new learning management system! Content is based on my book LMS Success. Come join our awesome, always energetic audience.

Register here: https://elearningindustry.com/webinars/successfully-implement-your-learning-management-system-lms

Here is the session description:

Congratulations! You’ve selected the perfect Learning Management System. Now what? Join Katrina Marie Baker in this 60-minute webinar for a lively discussion and some amusing war stories from past implementations.

Our agenda will cover how to:

  • Complete your implementation so smoothly that executive leadership is in awe of your project management skills.
  • Avoid common pitfalls that cause your implementation to stretch out longer than originally expected.
  • Work effectively with your LMS vendor to determine a timeline, set expectations, and get everything done on time.
  • Assemble an administrator team that is excited, knowledgeable, and well organized.

The post Free Webinar: Successfully Implement Your Learning Management System (LMS) appeared first on eLearning.

Free Webinar: Trends In Training And Learning Management

On November 21, I’m doing a virtual session covering the biggest trends in training and learning management! Just in time for the new year. The audience is always super involved, which keeps things entertaining.

Register here: https://elearningindustry.com/webinars/training-trends-and-learning-management?utm_source=presenter&utm_campaign=adobe_webinar_nov21

Here is the session description:

Join Adobe’s Senior Learning Evangelist Katrina Marie Baker for this lively conversation about the latest trends in training & development. Based on recent studies and research, the session will explore what people are doing in organizations around the world, and how organizations can achieve great results with modern learning programs.

Katrina Marie Baker will discuss the:

  • Impetus behind creating and developing virtual universities
  • Growing demand to encourage learner immersion and ongoing engagement
  • Rise of mobile learning
  • Role of skill-based learning in business training
  • Use of gamification for learner engagement and motivation
  • Ongoing expectations of learners for video
  • Proving the value of your learning program through more relevant reporting

The post Free Webinar: Trends In Training And Learning Management appeared first on eLearning.

Recommended Research: Constructivism & Learning Technology

Last week, we had an awesome virtual class on how to implement an effective gamification strategy within a corporate learning environment!  Here is the recording and slideshare.

In class, we briefly touched on some learning theories and research related to constructivism and the effective use of technology, games and gamification within the overall learning environment.  I’ve been reading a lot of articles recently that relate to constructivism, and some of our attendees were interested in receiving a list of those resources.  Below are a few reading suggestions.

I’ll create more recommended reading lists, so follow me if this sort of thing is useful to you.  The next blog posts will probably be devoted to virtual and augmented reality resources.  (If you haven’t checked out the crazy cool VR features in Adobe Captivate 2019, please take a look!)  I will also post my own summaries of select articles over the next few weeks.

Please add your own suggested reading articles in the comments section!

Here are three introductory level readings that are great as starters:

A great explanation of what constructivism is, what helps us learn, and what learning truly is.

An in-depth look at the learning process from beginning to end, including how to use educational technology (and how not to use it), and the importance of social learning and collaboration.

An overview of the types of educational technology available for use in the learning environment, as well as a historical perspective of how that technology has evolved.

I just finished working my way through the below articles, many of which are referenced by the above chapters, and cross-referenced amongst each other:

  1. Shaffer, D. W., Squire, K., Halverson, R., & Gee, J. P. (2005). Video games and the future of learning. Phi Delta Kappan, 87, 104–111. Google Scholar
  2. Shuler, C. (2009). Pockets of potential: Using mobile technologies to promote children’s learning. New York, NY: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop. Google Scholar
  3. Thomas, M., & Brown, J. S. (2011). A new culture of learning: Cultivating the imagination for a world of constant change. Lexington, KY: CreateSpace. Google Scholar
  4. Van Eck, R. (2006). Digital game-based learning: It’s not just the digital natives who are restless. EDUCAUSE Review, 41(2), 16–30. Google Scholar
  5. Vavoula, G., Sharples, M., Lonsdale, P., Rudman, P., & Meek, J. (2007). Learning bridges: Mobile technologies in education. Educational Technology, 47(3), 33–37. Google Scholar

More articles and article summaries coming soon.  Please follow my posts if you’d like to see more!

The post Recommended Research: Constructivism & Learning Technology appeared first on eLearning.