YouTube Learning: Investing in educational creators, resources, and tools for EduTubers

YouTube gibt bekannt, dass es 20 Millionen Dollar in Bildung und Lernen investieren will, genauer, in YouTube Learning, „an initiative to support education focused creators and expert organizations that create and curate high quality learning content on YouTube“. Weitere Details finden sich in diesem Artikel. Dabei denke ich gerade daran, das YouTube & Lernen ja ein schönes Thema für einen Artikel wäre: über Lernvideo-Entwickler und Lernende, über Lernvideo-Formate, Lernvideos für Schüler, Studierende, Sportler usw., Edu-Channel, Bildungsanbieter auf YouTube, Geschäftsmodelle, usw. Es könnte natürlich immer nur eine Momentaufnahme sein …
Malik Ducard, YouTube Blog, 22. Oktober 2018

Bildquelle: Christian Wiediger (Unsplash)

5 Examples of Interactive Video Solutions for Corporate Training

The usage of videos for corporate training purposes has been an established practice for many years now. But, this also has its drawbacks as longer run length videos tend to make the learner get lot in the process and create a rift in attention and learning. It also generates an obstacle when cognition levels are higher and the learners are required to analyze and apply the learning.

Now, with the advancement of technology, learners are able to have better engagement in courses. We can also leverage on learning and enhance videos by adding interactive elements to it, making learners meet the required goals and increase the level of engagement as well as appealing to different learner types.

Here are 5 killer examples of how Interactive Video solutions can be used to enhance corporate training.

These 5 examples of interactive framework will certainly ensure that your learners are actively engaged in the learning process. You can use these Interactive Video solutions to craft high-impact corporate training for formal training as well as for performance support.

Source: https://www.eidesign.net/5-examples-of-interactive-video-solutions-for-corporate-training/

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Adobe Captivate 2019 release

Fluid Boxes – Adobe is Listening!

When Fluid Boxes were launched in Captivate 2017 Release, I was pleased with this approach to responsive design. However, I felt like some aspects needed improvement. For me, the main thing was resizing of Fluid Boxes. Resizing Fluid Boxes was done by using the blue selection handles and dragging your mouse. Even using Rulers and Guides this was a difficult task of precisely setting up Fluid Boxes of an exact size. I’m pleased to report that with Captivate 2019 you can select the Fluid Boxes to resize them to a precise number of pixels or percentage by selecting the Fluid Box and navigating over to your Position panel. From there you can type in a percentage or pixel count, and you’re done. This is useful when you have a Fluid Box that serves the same purpose on many different slides in your project. For example, a Fluid Box dedicated to slide titles or navigation controls.

Another improvement that we’ve been asking for is the ability to correct for misaligned or improperly distributed objects within a fluid box, or for that matter wrongly distributed fluid boxes within a parent fluid box. Adobe has provided a simple button to distribute these object equally. This works well when I’ve resized something by accident.

I think my favourite improvement to fluid boxes in Captivate 2019 is the ability to align Static Fluid Boxes. Regular Fluid Boxes are great when your content is side by side. However, if you need your content to overlap, or require additional state objects, you need a Static Fluid Box. As we now know, Static Fluid Boxes have to maintain their aspect ratio. This means that as you shrink from one screen size to another, the content in a Static Fluid Box always shrinks with it. In Captivate 2017 the Static Fluid Box would always remain centered within the area for that Fluid Box. It wasn’t always what I had in mind with my design. Fortunately, with Captivate 2019 you can now choose a custom alignment for Static fluid boxes. You can align the Static Fluid Box any number of ways both horizontally and vertically.

This next improvement isn’t an improvement to fluid boxes, but I sure could have used it earlier this year when designing a series of modules for a client whose target device was iPads. This organisation doesn’t use computers, but each location has several iPads for a variety of purposes including training. No problem for me because I have an iPad. There was just one problem. Every time I wanted to test a version of one of the modules, I needed to publish it for HTML5, upload the published course to my web server, email myself the URL so I could pick it up on my iPad and then launch the course. With all the iterations of each module and a total of about two dozen modules, this was time-consuming. Thankfully now I will have access to Live Preview on Devices, a new preview method in Captivate 2019 that displays a QR code on your computer screen. With a mobile device on the same Wi-Fi network as your computer, you point your camera at your screen, and the course magically launches on your device.

I know that some eLearning designer-developers downplay the importance of responsive design, but look around at some of the remote workers and see what equipment they are using. In the early 2000s when the price of laptops came down, we started seeing remote workers using laptops. For example, you might see appliance repair persons, telecom installers and various others using laptops for managing what was traditionally done with pen, paper and clipboards. I’ve been observing these workers using a variety of different tablets and in some cases even larger smartphones. I’ve also seen a restaurant using tablets for the servers to take guest orders. This tells me that responsive design will be the way we all design some day. I predict that if in 5 years time if you’re not designing responsive elearning, you will not have a competitive edge. When you look at the improvements to fluid boxes in Captivate 2019, it is clear that Adobe is preparing for that eventuality.

New Features for Experiential Learning

As you start to work with the new features in Adobe Captivate 2019, you start to see a theme with many of the features. For me, that theme is experiential learning. Of course, some of you would argue that you cannot have experiential eLearning. eLearning isn’t close enough to real life. While we may not be able to immerse learners entirely in reality, this version of Captivate takes a few big steps toward that direction.

For a few years, I’ve been listening to other Captivate developers talk about virtual reality and the dream to design 3D eLearning. That dream is now a reality with Captivate 2019. You can now create a virtual reality eLearning project that learners can view on their computer screen, mobile device and even using a VR headset. Learners can turn in all directions and view whatever environment you wish to display to them. You can make it truly interactive by adding hotspots to perform a variety of different actions. You can play additional audio, display additional images, show the learner a text passage and much more. I’m very interested in seeing how other developers use this feature. If eLearning was a video game, we’ve just gone from Donkey Kong to World of Warcraft.

VR is cool, and everything but I predict that the breakthrough feature of Adobe Captivate 2019 will be the new Interactive Video feature. An interactive video gives you the ability to design video-based learning interactions for your learners that are truly engaging and immersive.  You can insert bookmarks on the video timeline and jump to those bookmarks from anywhere in your eLearning project. You can also add overlay slides that will hover over the paused video for learners to gain additional information. You can also add question slides as overlays. You can have the outcome of the question determine where you navigate your learners to depending on how they answer. So for example, if the learner gets a question wrong you can navigate to a portion of the video where the video instructor provides remediation to the learner, or alternatively offer praise to the learner for getting the answer correct.

I’m really excited to not only see what other developers will use these features for, but I’m excited to start telling my clients about what we can now do in eLearning that we couldn’t do today. I’d love to hear what your ideas are. Feel free to put your own suggestions in the comments below and please share this article with your fellow eLearning designer-developers.

Virtual Reality Projects

In this video tutorial, I show you the new Virtual Reality Projects in Adobe Captivate 2019.

Interactive Video

In this video tutorial, I show you what I predict will be the standout feature of Adobe Captivate 2019, Interactive Video. I will show you how to add overlay slides to your videos, and interactive items like knowledge check questions. In addition, you will be able to easily add really cool remediation to your interactive videos.

YouTube Streaming

In this video tutorial, I will show you the changes in the Insert Video window in Captivate 2019. You will also learn about the new way to insert YouTube videos into your eLearning project and how to make YouTube videos interactive.

Live Preview on Devices

Before Captivate 2019, if I wanted to preview my designs on a mobile device, I had to publish the whole project, upload it to my web server, email myself a hyperlink and then launch the course from my mobile device. In this video tutorial, I show you how easy it is to do the same thing just by using a simple QR Code reader in iOS or Android devices. No web server required.

Webcam Video Demo

In this video tutorial, I show you how you can record and insert clips from your webcam into your video demo tutorials recorded in Adobe Captivate 2018 Release.

Enhanced Fluid Boxes

In this video tutorial, I show you how fluid boxes have been enhanced and improved in Adobe Captivate 2019 Release

CSV Import for Questions

In this video tutorial, I’ll show you how easy it is to import a variety of question types into your Adobe Captivate project using CSV files that you can edit or create using spreadsheet software such as Microsoft Excel or Apple Numbers.

PowerPoint in Responsive Projects

In this video tutorial, I show you the new ability to import PowerPoint slides into your Adobe Captivate 2019 responsive design project. I probably won’t use this feature, but I see the value in having this feature available to new Captivate users.

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Teens, Social Media & Technology 2018

Fürs Protokoll: Die Ergebnisse einer Befragung amerikanischer Jugendlicher (13 – 17 Jahre) haben jetzt noch einmal unterstrichen, wie sich die Präferenzen verschoben haben. YouTube, Instagram und Snapchat liegen in der Gunst vorne, Facebook folgt auf Platz 4, dann Twitter. Und ohne Smartphones geht im Alltag Jugendlicher nichts mehr. 45 Prozent von ihnen sagen, dass sie rund um die Uhr online sind.
Monica Anderson und Jingjing Jiang, Pew Research Center, 31. Mai 2018

What do Generation Z and millennials expect from technology in education?

Pearson, der Bildungskonzern, hat 2.558 Menschen in den USA zwischen 14 und 40 Jahren nach ihren „attitudes, preferences, and behaviors around technology in education“ gefragt. Dabei waren sie besonders an Unterschieden zwischen Nutzern der Generation Z (14 – 23 Jahre) und den Millennials (24 – 40 Jahre) interessiert. Wie es zu erwarten war, sind die Unterschiede nicht groß. Beide Generationen stehen dem Einsatz von Medien- und Netztechnologien im Bildungsbereich positiv gegenüber. Zwei Punkte schaffen es aber dann doch in die Zwischenüberschriften: „YouTube’s importance to Gen Z cannot be overstated“. Denn: „55 of Gen Z say YouTube has contributed to their education, learning, and/ or personal development in the past 12 months“ (Millennials: 40 Prozent). Und, der zweite Punkt: „Gen Z is the „App Generation“ – even in education“. Womit das auch geklärt wäre.
Pearson, 24. Mai 2018

Bildquelle: Hello I’m Nik (Unsplash)

Internet Trends Report 2018

Das jährliche Internet-Kompendium von Mary Meeker ist erschienen. Dieses Mal sind es 294 Seiten, wieder voll mit Daten, Schaubildern und Trends. Sie betreffen die Nutzung des Netzes, Märkte, E-Commerce, Werbung, Technologien und immer wieder China. Es gibt dann auch ein Kapitel, „Economic Growth Drivers“, das mit fünf Slides zum Stichwort „Lifelong Learning“ gefüllt ist und mit einigen Zahlen, die die wachsende Bedeutung dieses Bereichs unterstreichen. Donald Clark hat auch schon versucht, aus den Daten etwas mitzunehmen („20 important takeaways for learning world from Mary Meeker’s brilliant tech trends“). Fürs Protokoll.
Mary Meeker, KPCB, Slideshare, 30. Mai 2018

Irgendetwas mit Video!

Mit diesem Vortrag durfte ich heute einen Video-Tag der ILT Solutions in Köln einleiten. Er spannt einen kleinen Bogen vom Phänomen „Erklärfilme“, über einige Milestones in der (Erklär)Filmgeschichte bis zur Palette der verschiedenen Einsatzmöglichkeiten und Formate, die sich Interessierten heute bietet. Anschließend konnten die Teilnehmenden in einzelnen Workshops selbst aktiv werden: Instructional Design, Technik und Filmproduktion standen auf der Agenda, immer auch mit Blick auf Smartphones und user-generated content. Ein schöner Rahmen!
Jochen Robes, SlideShare, 16. März 2018

Familiarity

Over the years and role changes I’ve used a variety of different VLEs. From Blackboard to FutureLearn, and from custom in-house developed VLE to customised large-scale MOOC platform. So, how important is familiarity when working, designing and developing on these platforms?

Firstly, are we talking about the familiarity I need to navigate the multitude of features and processes to get the course built and delivered? Or do we mean the familiarity the learner needs in order to have a smooth and tangible learning experience, whether they sit down and structure their learning or dip in as and when they can? Let’s try and deal with both.

Explain everything

  • For me: If you’re new to the platform it’s good to write notes to yourself as you do something new, work out how a feature works, etc. This is also a great resource for you or the rest of the team to open discussion around the how and why of particular approach to presenting a learning resource. Keep ideas, plans, design/colour schemes, times, asset library, etc. all in one place for easy reference. 
  • For the learner: Accept that the learner may not have read your carefully scripted course page or expensive course promo video and repeat it at the beginning of the course. The odds are that you put a lot of effort into that content so make sure it’s of use at the start of the course. It will need to be modified, you don’t need the marketing/promotional terminology here, so make sure it reads like the rest of the course (the ‘voice’ of the learning). Carry this approach to the whole course, not just the start: explain why you’ve included a video to watch and what the learner should think about while they watch it. Explain the structure of the course and what it means for their journey, and how the journey ends. And what happens after that. 

Structure and navigation

  • For me: A new platform will mean a lot of different, well, everything! Who hosts, manages or supports the platform? Who are they, where are they, when are they available? Make them your new BFF and ask for help as well as providing a fresh pair of eyes and offer feedback from your own experience on other platforms to see if you can provide efficiencies or development to improve. Always ask questions and always explain why, as well as showing them your results. 
  • For the learner: A consistent structure and navigation to the course will help the learner feel more comfortable and relaxed, therefore are more likely to retain the knowledge you’re presenting them with. As with the previous item, explain how the structure works, explain how to use the navigation, and above all keep the consistency of design that you’ve worked hard to develop. If you use colour of font size as a code of activity or resource identification, use it every time (you’ d be surprised how often I’ve seen inconsistencies, usually across courses rather than within the same course).

Example: FutureLearn navigation, Warwick’s ‘Leadership for healthcare improvement and innovation’.

Template

  • For me: Personally I hate templates or a forced way of working, but the method and structure they offer are hard to ignore. There’s a reason why templates work and that, as I mentioned previously, provides a consistency across courses, programmes, and team members. if you’re working in isolation, then the template probably doesn’t make sense to you as you already know what you’re doing. If you working a part of a larger team then the template provides the working structure you all need to adhere to to get that consistency I talked about.
  • For the learner: The template should not be something the learner ever really notices. The template is there to provide a consistent learning experience for the learner. If it works they wont notice it. If it fails they’ll complain of not understanding what they should be doing, or when, or how, or why. The template will provide familiarity and structure.

Text and images

  • For me: Nothing bores me more than a course full of pages and pages of text, no visual cue at all as to what’s happening. If nothing else a well placed image showing the general theme or topic helps bring the page to life. While some subjects are clearly more visual than others, there’s no excuse for not using some Creative Commons or licensed images, a YouTube video also explaining the subject, concept, interview with an expert, educator, practitioner, etc. While we try and accommodate as many styles of presenting learning materials, and those materials often reach us from the educator in text form, we would not be doing our job if we didn’t try and find a visual solution to break the text blocks up, even if it’s only a different way of presenting the text.
  • For the learner: if the learner wanted to read a textbook to gain the knowledge and qualification from the course, they’d that. Often what one learner likes is not what another likes. While one person can read book after book and retain the knowledge easily many cant, me being one of them. The inclusion of different sorts of activities helps, but so do different approaches to presenting the learning materials: image, charts, photos, infographics, video interviews, to-camera teaching presentations, video case studies, high-profile documentaries (check the ownership and originality if you’re using these from YouTube), etc. There’s always a way to bring something visual to the course.

Example: Documentary – DHL International Supply Chain, loaded to YouTube by DHL.

… now make an activity out of it, introduce some questions that the video can help with but requires the learner to go further afield to find answers and more resources for. Make the image or video part of the learning, not the learning itself.

Langauge

  • For me: If the whole team uses the term ‘page’ or ‘step’ to indicate a different element of a learning package, then be sure you all use that term. By using a variety of different terms to mean the same thing you will forever be translating instructions from one source to another for different things. Something will always get lost in the translation, mistakes will be made no matter how hard you try, and there will be more work down the line when you have to unravel the mess. Be sure the terms you use within the team are consistent (that word again) and appropriate. If you work with a new educator who’s used to different terms and ways of working then open the dialogue and work out what’s best – do they change to accommodate you and your team, or do you change your processes to accommodate them? Decide early on and stick to it! 
  • For the learner: No one wants to read a course that is heavy in jargon, acronyms, complicated academic terminology or badly presented materials. No one. Even if you’re writing for advanced Masters level students you should still use appropriate language, explain an acronym, and avoid jargon. You obviously don’t want to dumb the language down so it sounds like you’re being condescending to them, but there is a level that is acceptable. Find it, stick to it, and test it!

Familiarity in learning has always been about consistency – consistency in the approach to design and present the materials, consistency in language appropriate to the level of the course and the intended audience, consistency in quality of photos or images or videos, consistency in length of pages or steps. By being consistent in what you do and how you do it your course will also offer a consistency the learner will become accustomed to, which will bread familiarity and comfort with. From here it will be easier to follow the learning and complete the course.

Image source: Pete Birkinshaw (CC BY 2.0)