PowerPoint Tip: Here’s a Simple Way to Build E-Learning Graphics

PowerPoint tip graphics

Here’s a PowerPoint tip: build your e-learning course graphics in PowerPoint. PowerPoint is great for simple graphic design projects. In fact, I use it quite a bit for this blog and some of the graphics I need in my e-learning demos.

In a previous post, I shared visual design tips for graphics I built in Rise 360 for an e-learning scenario. All of those graphics were built in PowerPoint.

PowerPoint for graphic design example 5

In this example, the images all need to be wide, but short rectangles so that I could get them about the same height as the text and squeeze them as close as possible to the button stacks in Rise 360.

I created a custom slide size 13 x 4 inches. When I save the PowerPoint slides as images that results in an image that is 1280 x 384 pixels.

Here’s a detailed tutorial that walks through the process of creating similar graphics in PowerPoint. I cover a lot of little PowerPoint tips.

Click here to view the PowerPoint tutorial on YouTube.

The links below take you to specific parts of the tutorial. The last two links show how to create the final pill shape with the character’s head extended outside of the image.

The tutorial above shows how I created the images. But here are a few key points to consider.

PowerPoint Tip: Step Away from PowerPoint as a Presentation Tool

If you’ve read much of this blog, you know that I’m a big advocate for using PowerPoint to build simple graphics. It’s easy to use, most people have it, and there’s not much you can’t create with PowerPoint once you learn a few things.

Is it Photoshop or Illustrator? No! And if you have expertise with those tools, then have at it. But for those who don’t have a graphics editor and need a simple solution, give PowerPoint a try.

PowerPoint tip for e-learning graphics

Here are some previous posts that show what you can do:

PowerPoint Tip: Save Slides as Images

Whatever you build in PowerPoint you can right-click and save as an image. I usually save as .PNG. This preserves the color clarity and any transparency. If you save as .JPG, the transparent areas fill with white.

PowerPoint tip right click save as image

For most cases (especially when working with Rise 360), I like to use the slide as my entire image. So I build what I need and then save the slide as image rather than PPTX. While there are a number of image options, like above, I stick with .PNG.

PowerPoint tip save slide as image

PowerPoint Tip: Create Custom Slide Sizes

The default PowerPoint slide is 16 x 9 aspect ratio. In most cases that is fine. It works great for Rise 360. However, there may be times when you want a custom slide. For example, if you want a square image, you need to change the slide size. I usually use 10 inches by 10 inches which gives me an image that is close to 1000 x 1000 pixels (give or take).

Go to the Design Tab and select Slide Size to change the settings.

PowerPoint tip slide size

PowerPoint Tips: Install Studio 360

Many of you are you are using Articulate 360 which comes with Rise 360 and Storyline 360. Those are obviously the go-to apps for building courses. Because of this, many people ignore Studio 360 which comes with Articulate 360.

PowerPoint tip Characters

Even if you don’t use Studio 360 to build courses (why would you when you have Rise 360), it’s still a good idea to install it. The main reason is that you get access to all of the assets including the characters from Content Library 360. And when you build graphics for your e-learning courses, especially as I did in Rise 360, it helps to have all of the characters in PowerPoint.

If you aren’t using a graphics editor or don’t know how, then PowerPoint is a really easy way to build graphics for you e-learning courses.


Download the fully revised, free 63-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

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Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

 

Hyperlinking boxes using PowerPoint

I’ve imported a PowerPoint presentation and some of the slides have individual boxes to hyperlink content using a URL, local files or linking a slide within the presentation.  I’m able to link the URL fine and it plays in preview mode, but having difficulty linking a slide in the presentation or a local file.

Any suggestions to resolve?

The post Hyperlinking boxes using PowerPoint appeared first on eLearning.

PowerPoint for Content/Captivate for Interactivity

Recently, I’ve begin to define specific roles for my eLearning development tools and it has made an improvement in my efficiency. For instance, I have realized how much easier and faster it is to create all my text/image-based content in PowerPoint and import it into Captivate, and then build interactions around the PPT slides in Captivate. Let the tools do what they are best at.

The round tripping feature in Captivate makes using PowerPoint very, very easy. As much as I love Captivate, PowerPoint is much faster for content creation and slide layout.

PowerPoint is a universal tool, which makes it easy to share with SMEs, so that they can make the edits themselves and provide you with revisions.

I know I’m not the first to proclaim this, but thought I would share with you this information, in hopes that it may benefit you in your eLearning development.

The post PowerPoint for Content/Captivate for Interactivity appeared first on eLearning.

How to Transcribe Text into PowerPoint & E-Learning Courses

transcribe text PowerPoint HTML5 Flash

I’ve been playing around with ideas to get old Flash course content into a new HTML5 course. There are tens of thousands of old Flash-based e-learning courses where people no longer have the source files. All they have are published versions of the course and need to convert to HTML5.

Grabbing the media like images, video, and audio is usually not as challenging. But moving all of the text can be a hassle.

In a previous post we discovered how to use screenshots and OCR to extract the text from the old course screens. Another way to get the text into your slide is by reading it out loud to transcribe it and insert into your slide. I like this approach because you it’s easy and you have to go through the content anyway. Reading it out loud may help you think through the tone and some script changes you’ll make in the new HTML5 course.

There are applications you can buy to do the recording and transcription, but I want to focus on tools you already have that won’t cost anything more.

Use PowerPoint to Transcribe Text for HTML5 E-Learning

transcribe text for e-learning with PowerPoint for HTML5 course

The new version of PowerPoint has a dictate feature. All you do is press the button and start to read. PowerPoint transcribes the text and adds it to the slide. Then you make your edits. You can also send the file out to be verified and edited by others who use PowerPoint. Once it’s ready, import the slides into Storyline.

Use Google Docs to Transcribe Text for HTML5 E-Learning

transcribe text for e-learning with Google Docs for HTML5 course

Some of you use Google Docs instead of Microsoft Office. In Google Docs, under the Tools tab, you’ll find a Voice Typing feature. Just press it and it starts to record. If I speak clearly, I find it to be very accurate. Once the text is on the page, send it around to be verified and approved. And then copy and paste it into your HTML 5 course.

Use Windows to Transcribe Text for HTML5 E-Learning

transcribe text for e-learning with Windows for HTML5 course

Microsoft Windows has a transcription feature that works to transcribe text right into Storyline. Press Windows + h keys to open the narration window. Start talking and it will do the transcription. It’s not quite as fast or accurate as the solutions above, but it makes up for it by recording right into the Storyline slide or Rise lesson.

So, there you have it, three easy ways to read the text from old Flash-based courses to get them into your new HTML5 course that you can update and edit as needed. Then publish it for HTML5 and you are all set.


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  • We're currently working on additional locations and dates for 2019.

 

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

 

Generating speech using Power Point Notes

Dear Forum,

Do any of you have tips to solve the following problem.

With Captivate 2019, creating a project with a power point presentation.

Using Power Point Notes to generate speech.

Problem:

Some words require specification for correct pronounciation. Doing this by adding to Neospeech dictionary.

Previously, the new pronounciations did have effect, now they dont. It is like Captivate is ignoring if you update e.g. the James voice to pronounce words correctly.

Any ideas ?

The post Generating speech using Power Point Notes appeared first on eLearning.

Captivate 2017 et 2019 freeze lorsque j’ouvre un fichier PowerPoint

Bonjour,

Je suis sous environnement Mac OSX (10.13.6) et dois reprendre un projet initialement réalisé sous PowerPoint (v.16.20). Lorsque je crée un nouveau fichier “à partir de PowerPoint” et que j’ouvre ce projet sous Captivate 2017 ou Captivate 2019, voici ce qu’il se passe :

01. Le fichier PowerPoint s’ouvre dans PowerPoint.
02. Captivate importe le fichier et une barre de défilement indique la progression de cette importation.
03. Tout au long de cette importation, une fenêtre ne cesse d’apparaître à intervalles réguliers m’informant que “Pour utiliser les outils de ligne de commande Java, je dois installer un JDK” et que je dois cliquer sur OK pour me connecter au site internet proposant le téléchargement du paquet de développement Java (JDK).
04. Si je ne fais pas ce téléchargement et cette installation, une seconde fenêtre “Convertir les présentations Microsoft PowerPoint” apparaît. Et là, que que je fasse, l’application Captivate est bloquée. Je ne peux que la quitter.
05. SI je télécharge et installe le paquet de développement (JDK) et que je redémarre mon ordinateur et que je recommence la procédure : rien ne change. Les mêmes fenêtres apparaissent et Captivate est toujours bloqué.

À titre d’information, si j’utilise le logiciel Keynote pour ouvrir et transformer ce même fichier PowerPoint, tout se fait normalement et je n’ai strictement aucun souci.

Pouvez-vous m’aider ?

The post Captivate 2017 et 2019 freeze lorsque j’ouvre un fichier PowerPoint appeared first on eLearning.

How to Convert an E-Learning Course into a PowerPoint File

convert e-learning to PowerPoint

The other day someone asked how to convert their Storyline course into a PowerPoint presentation. PowerPoint and Storyline look similar but they are two separate applications. You can import PowerPoint slides into Storyline, which makes it easy to convert some existing PowerPoint content into an interactive e-learning course. However, PowerPoint doesn’t offer a way to import Storyline files.

With that said, there are some ways to convert your Storyline course content into a format you can bring into PowerPoint.

Setting Expectations for PowerPoint Conversion

One of the reasons people like to convert the Storyline content to PowerPoint is so they have a presentation version of the course that they can share with other presenters. If this is something you need to do, I’ll share a few ideas, but you do need to understand that there are some constraints.

  • Storyline content is usually interactive with triggers showing layers and object state changes. PowerPoint presentations can be interactive, but they tend to be linear presentations of content. So it’s not an apples-to-apples conversion.
  • Whatever you export from Storyline will not be interactive. It’ll either be a video or series of images. That means you can’t isolate text boxes, shapes, or other media to edit on the PowerPoint slides. However, the opposite is true if you want to import your PowerPoint slides into Storyline.
  • You can simulate interactions in PowerPoint with hyperlinks to other slides using hotspots, but you can’t get the type of interactivity you get in Storyline. If you really need to retain the interactive elements, then it probably doesn’t make sense to convert to PowerPoint.

With that clear, let’s review a few ideas for getting your Storyline content into PowerPoint.

Save the Storyline Course as a Video

This is easy to do. Publish the Storyline file as an .MP4. As you can see in the image below, you have a number of resolution and quality settings. Once published the final output will be video.

Storyline to PowerPoint save as video

If you do have interactive elements in your Storyline course, you’ll need to set the triggers in Storyline to account for the change from interactive content to a linear video. That includes triggers that show layers and other objects that aren’t initially visible on the base slide.

As far as PowerPoint, all you need to do is insert the video onto a slide.

Screen Capture the Storyline Course and Save as Images

Open the published course in a browser and do a screen capture of the slides (just the slides and not the player). Here are a few options:

  • Capture the slides individually by going from slide-to-slide. This is a lot slower, but gives you more control when capturing.
  • Capture the course as a video and then output the video as images. Most video editing software has a way to export the video as a series of images. You’ll get an image for each frame. No need to capture at 30 frames per second (fps). I’d capture at a really low frame rate like 2-5 fps so you have less noise when pulling out the images you want.
  • Use a tool like Screen2Gif to create a .gif which consists of images and can usually be output as a series of images. It’s an easy process and the software is free.

Once you have the images you need, insert them into PowerPoint slides.

At that point, you can review the pictures and make edits. For example, where you have interactive instructions like the image below, you either add an interactive element to move to another slide or you add a colored shape to cover the instruction.

Storyline to PowerPoint add hyperlinks

I like working with images better than video because there’s more flexibility. Video gives you a single file, whereas it’s easier to work with multiple images. You have more control over some customization at the slide level and can more easily introduce interactive elements in PowerPoint.

The one thing you can’t get in the conversion is a PowerPoint slide with separated text, pictures, and shapes. It doesn’t work that way. However, if you need the content in a PowerPoint format, the options above should work.

In a follow up post, I’ll show how to make the video interactive and how to add interactive elements to the slide images.


Download the fully revised, free 63-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

Upcoming E-Learning Events

  • We're currently working on locations and dates for 2019.

 

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

 

How to Convert an E-Learning Course into a PowerPoint File

convert e-learning to PowerPoint

The other day someone asked how to convert their Storyline course into a PowerPoint presentation. PowerPoint and Storyline look similar but they are two separate applications. You can import PowerPoint slides into Storyline, which makes it easy to convert some existing PowerPoint content into an interactive e-learning course. However, PowerPoint doesn’t offer a way to import Storyline files.

With that said, there are some ways to convert your Storyline course content into a format you can bring into PowerPoint.

Setting Expectations for PowerPoint Conversion

One of the reasons people like to convert the Storyline content to PowerPoint is so they have a presentation version of the course that they can share with other presenters. If this is something you need to do, I’ll share a few ideas, but you do need to understand that there are some constraints.

  • Storyline content is usually interactive with triggers showing layers and object state changes. PowerPoint presentations can be interactive, but they tend to be linear presentations of content. So it’s not an apples-to-apples conversion.
  • Whatever you export from Storyline will not be interactive. It’ll either be a video or series of images. That means you can’t isolate text boxes, shapes, or other media to edit on the PowerPoint slides. However, the opposite is true if you want to import your PowerPoint slides into Storyline.
  • You can simulate interactions in PowerPoint with hyperlinks to other slides using hotspots, but you can’t get the type of interactivity you get in Storyline. If you really need to retain the interactive elements, then it probably doesn’t make sense to convert to PowerPoint.

With that clear, let’s review a few ideas for getting your Storyline content into PowerPoint.

Save the Storyline Course as a Video

This is easy to do. Publish the Storyline file as an .MP4. As you can see in the image below, you have a number of resolution and quality settings. Once published the final output will be video.

Storyline to PowerPoint save as video

If you do have interactive elements in your Storyline course, you’ll need to set the triggers in Storyline to account for the change from interactive content to a linear video. That includes triggers that show layers and other objects that aren’t initially visible on the base slide.

As far as PowerPoint, all you need to do is insert the video onto a slide.

Screen Capture the Storyline Course and Save as Images

Open the published course in a browser and do a screen capture of the slides (just the slides and not the player). Here are a few options:

  • Capture the slides individually by going from slide-to-slide. This is a lot slower, but gives you more control when capturing.
  • Capture the course as a video and then output the video as images. Most video editing software has a way to export the video as a series of images. You’ll get an image for each frame. No need to capture at 30 frames per second (fps). I’d capture at a really low frame rate like 2-5 fps so you have less noise when pulling out the images you want.
  • Use a tool like Screen2Gif to create a .gif which consists of images and can usually be output as a series of images. It’s an easy process and the software is free.

Once you have the images you need, insert them into PowerPoint slides.

At that point, you can review the pictures and make edits. For example, where you have interactive instructions like the image below, you either add an interactive element to move to another slide or you add a colored shape to cover the instruction.

Storyline to PowerPoint add hyperlinks

I like working with images better than video because there’s more flexibility. Video gives you a single file, whereas it’s easier to work with multiple images. You have more control over some customization at the slide level and can more easily introduce interactive elements in PowerPoint.

The one thing you can’t get in the conversion is a PowerPoint slide with separated text, pictures, and shapes. It doesn’t work that way. However, if you need the content in a PowerPoint format, the options above should work.

In a follow up post, I’ll show how to make the video interactive and how to add interactive elements to the slide images.


Download the fully revised, free 63-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

Upcoming E-Learning Events

  • We're currently working on locations and dates for 2019.

 

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

 

Converting PowerPoint with animated smart art and other objects to HTML5 not working as expected.

Hi,

I am just looking to see if captivate could help us. The first course of action is to simply convert existing PowerPoints (2016 – O365) into HTML5 for use within an LMS. However, at the first hurdle I seem to have fallen as smart art is not being converted as I would expect.

I have also not that fade in on test is not working either.

The post Converting PowerPoint with animated smart art and other objects to HTML5 not working as expected. appeared first on eLearning.

Converting PowerPoint with animated smart art and other objects to HTML5 not working as expected.

Hi,

I am just looking to see if captivate could help us. The first course of action is to simply convert existing PowerPoints (2016 – O365) into HTML5 for use within an LMS. However, at the first hurdle I seem to have fallen as smart art is not being converted as I would expect.

I have also not that fade in on test is not working either.

The post Converting PowerPoint with animated smart art and other objects to HTML5 not working as expected. appeared first on eLearning.