How to Convert an E-Learning Course into a PowerPoint File

convert e-learning to PowerPoint

The other day someone asked how to convert their Storyline course into a PowerPoint presentation. PowerPoint and Storyline look similar but they are two separate applications. You can import PowerPoint slides into Storyline, which makes it easy to convert some existing PowerPoint content into an interactive e-learning course. However, PowerPoint doesn’t offer a way to import Storyline files.

With that said, there are some ways to convert your Storyline course content into a format you can bring into PowerPoint.

Setting Expectations for PowerPoint Conversion

One of the reasons people like to convert the Storyline content to PowerPoint is so they have a presentation version of the course that they can share with other presenters. If this is something you need to do, I’ll share a few ideas, but you do need to understand that there are some constraints.

  • Storyline content is usually interactive with triggers showing layers and object state changes. PowerPoint presentations can be interactive, but they tend to be linear presentations of content. So it’s not an apples-to-apples conversion.
  • Whatever you export from Storyline will not be interactive. It’ll either be a video or series of images. That means you can’t isolate text boxes, shapes, or other media to edit on the PowerPoint slides. However, the opposite is true if you want to import your PowerPoint slides into Storyline.
  • You can simulate interactions in PowerPoint with hyperlinks to other slides using hotspots, but you can’t get the type of interactivity you get in Storyline. If you really need to retain the interactive elements, then it probably doesn’t make sense to convert to PowerPoint.

With that clear, let’s review a few ideas for getting your Storyline content into PowerPoint.

Save the Storyline Course as a Video

This is easy to do. Publish the Storyline file as an .MP4. As you can see in the image below, you have a number of resolution and quality settings. Once published the final output will be video.

Storyline to PowerPoint save as video

If you do have interactive elements in your Storyline course, you’ll need to set the triggers in Storyline to account for the change from interactive content to a linear video. That includes triggers that show layers and other objects that aren’t initially visible on the base slide.

As far as PowerPoint, all you need to do is insert the video onto a slide.

Screen Capture the Storyline Course and Save as Images

Open the published course in a browser and do a screen capture of the slides (just the slides and not the player). Here are a few options:

  • Capture the slides individually by going from slide-to-slide. This is a lot slower, but gives you more control when capturing.
  • Capture the course as a video and then output the video as images. Most video editing software has a way to export the video as a series of images. You’ll get an image for each frame. No need to capture at 30 frames per second (fps). I’d capture at a really low frame rate like 2-5 fps so you have less noise when pulling out the images you want.
  • Use a tool like Screen2Gif to create a .gif which consists of images and can usually be output as a series of images. It’s an easy process and the software is free.

Once you have the images you need, insert them into PowerPoint slides.

At that point, you can review the pictures and make edits. For example, where you have interactive instructions like the image below, you either add an interactive element to move to another slide or you add a colored shape to cover the instruction.

Storyline to PowerPoint add hyperlinks

I like working with images better than video because there’s more flexibility. Video gives you a single file, whereas it’s easier to work with multiple images. You have more control over some customization at the slide level and can more easily introduce interactive elements in PowerPoint.

The one thing you can’t get in the conversion is a PowerPoint slide with separated text, pictures, and shapes. It doesn’t work that way. However, if you need the content in a PowerPoint format, the options above should work.

In a follow up post, I’ll show how to make the video interactive and how to add interactive elements to the slide images.


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Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

 

How to Convert an E-Learning Course into a PowerPoint File

convert e-learning to PowerPoint

The other day someone asked how to convert their Storyline course into a PowerPoint presentation. PowerPoint and Storyline look similar but they are two separate applications. You can import PowerPoint slides into Storyline, which makes it easy to convert some existing PowerPoint content into an interactive e-learning course. However, PowerPoint doesn’t offer a way to import Storyline files.

With that said, there are some ways to convert your Storyline course content into a format you can bring into PowerPoint.

Setting Expectations for PowerPoint Conversion

One of the reasons people like to convert the Storyline content to PowerPoint is so they have a presentation version of the course that they can share with other presenters. If this is something you need to do, I’ll share a few ideas, but you do need to understand that there are some constraints.

  • Storyline content is usually interactive with triggers showing layers and object state changes. PowerPoint presentations can be interactive, but they tend to be linear presentations of content. So it’s not an apples-to-apples conversion.
  • Whatever you export from Storyline will not be interactive. It’ll either be a video or series of images. That means you can’t isolate text boxes, shapes, or other media to edit on the PowerPoint slides. However, the opposite is true if you want to import your PowerPoint slides into Storyline.
  • You can simulate interactions in PowerPoint with hyperlinks to other slides using hotspots, but you can’t get the type of interactivity you get in Storyline. If you really need to retain the interactive elements, then it probably doesn’t make sense to convert to PowerPoint.

With that clear, let’s review a few ideas for getting your Storyline content into PowerPoint.

Save the Storyline Course as a Video

This is easy to do. Publish the Storyline file as an .MP4. As you can see in the image below, you have a number of resolution and quality settings. Once published the final output will be video.

Storyline to PowerPoint save as video

If you do have interactive elements in your Storyline course, you’ll need to set the triggers in Storyline to account for the change from interactive content to a linear video. That includes triggers that show layers and other objects that aren’t initially visible on the base slide.

As far as PowerPoint, all you need to do is insert the video onto a slide.

Screen Capture the Storyline Course and Save as Images

Open the published course in a browser and do a screen capture of the slides (just the slides and not the player). Here are a few options:

  • Capture the slides individually by going from slide-to-slide. This is a lot slower, but gives you more control when capturing.
  • Capture the course as a video and then output the video as images. Most video editing software has a way to export the video as a series of images. You’ll get an image for each frame. No need to capture at 30 frames per second (fps). I’d capture at a really low frame rate like 2-5 fps so you have less noise when pulling out the images you want.
  • Use a tool like Screen2Gif to create a .gif which consists of images and can usually be output as a series of images. It’s an easy process and the software is free.

Once you have the images you need, insert them into PowerPoint slides.

At that point, you can review the pictures and make edits. For example, where you have interactive instructions like the image below, you either add an interactive element to move to another slide or you add a colored shape to cover the instruction.

Storyline to PowerPoint add hyperlinks

I like working with images better than video because there’s more flexibility. Video gives you a single file, whereas it’s easier to work with multiple images. You have more control over some customization at the slide level and can more easily introduce interactive elements in PowerPoint.

The one thing you can’t get in the conversion is a PowerPoint slide with separated text, pictures, and shapes. It doesn’t work that way. However, if you need the content in a PowerPoint format, the options above should work.

In a follow up post, I’ll show how to make the video interactive and how to add interactive elements to the slide images.


Download the fully revised, free 63-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

Upcoming E-Learning Events

  • We're currently working on locations and dates for 2019.

 

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

 

Converting PowerPoint with animated smart art and other objects to HTML5 not working as expected.

Hi,

I am just looking to see if captivate could help us. The first course of action is to simply convert existing PowerPoints (2016 – O365) into HTML5 for use within an LMS. However, at the first hurdle I seem to have fallen as smart art is not being converted as I would expect.

I have also not that fade in on test is not working either.

The post Converting PowerPoint with animated smart art and other objects to HTML5 not working as expected. appeared first on eLearning.

Converting PowerPoint with animated smart art and other objects to HTML5 not working as expected.

Hi,

I am just looking to see if captivate could help us. The first course of action is to simply convert existing PowerPoints (2016 – O365) into HTML5 for use within an LMS. However, at the first hurdle I seem to have fallen as smart art is not being converted as I would expect.

I have also not that fade in on test is not working either.

The post Converting PowerPoint with animated smart art and other objects to HTML5 not working as expected. appeared first on eLearning.

Importing PowerPoint File into Captivate 2019

The last time I tried to import a Microsoft PowerPoint file into to Captivate (CP 7) was for an assignment in my Master’s program. It was a nightmare! Recently, someone in the Captivate Facebook group asked a question about importing PowerPoint files into Captivate. I commented about the lack of functionality once the file is imported. If I remember correctly, with Captivate 7, the animations in the original file did not work. Another group member said the animations and importing files works perfectly in the updated version. I haven’t tried it since CP 7. Today, I decided to give it a try and I encountered my first issue. The background on the slides does not come over when importing. Is there a workaround for this?

The post Importing PowerPoint File into Captivate 2019 appeared first on eLearning.

PowerPoint Presentation import into Captivate Responsive projects!

The 2019 release of Adobe Captivate supports importing of PowerPoint presentations into a Responsive project. You can import and edit Microsoft PowerPoint presentations in a Responsive project. The imported slides can be edited in a Microsoft PowerPoint environment from within Adobe Captivate. You can choose to link to the source PowerPoint presentation to keep it in sync with the Adobe Captivate project.

NOTE: Importing a PowerPoint Presentation into a responsive project is only supported on Windows.

To import a PowerPoint presentation:

1. Open a Responsive project, select File > Import > PowerPoint Slides or in the button bar, select Slides > PowerPoint Slide.

2. Navigate to and select the PowerPoint presentation file that you want to import.

NOTE: .PPTX is the only PowerPoint presentation format supported in a responsive project. you can save other formats as .pptx to import it into a responsive project.

  • Click Open.
  • Decide where to place the imported PowerPoint slides in the Adobe Captivate project. Add the slides to the end of the project, or click a slide in the list and add the PowerPoint slides after that slide.

  Convert PowerPoint Presentations dialog box looks like:

 Select the PowerPoint slides to convert to Adobe Captivate project slides.
  • Set navigation preferences for the selected slides.
  • Import PowerPoint dialog.
    NOTE: High fidelity option is selected by default for PowerPoint presentation import into responsive project.
    3. If you want to link to the PowerPoint presentation, select Linked. If you want to embed the PowerPoint presentation, clear Linked.

    Adobe Captivate ensures that all Microsoft PowerPoint animations, all hierarchical animations (One by One, By level at Once etc.) that can be applied on Smart Art objects, all paragraph level animations on text having Text effects (glow, shadow, 3D, reflection, etc.), triggered Animations, audio bookmarks, and many more features are supported when a PPTX is imported.

    4. Click OK.

    Imported PowerPoint projects can be viewed across various devices. The aspect ratio of a slide is maintained throughout. Following image shows how a power Point slide looks on iPhone 7 plus(refer  Figure1)

    Figure1

    The PowerPoint slides are imported into the Adobe Captivate project and they appear in the designated location. If necessary, you can change the order of the slides.

    Sample Project:Sample_project

    Source PowerPoint Presentation:Earth

The post PowerPoint Presentation import into Captivate Responsive projects! appeared first on eLearning.

How to Create Videos in PowerPoint

create videos in PowerPoint

One of my favorite features in PowerPoint is saving the PowerPoint slideshow as a video. That means anything you put on the PowerPoint slides (from animations to slide transitions) is output as video. With some creativity, you can pull together some pretty slick explainer-type presentations with a tool most of us already have.

Today, I want to show something simple that may give you some ideas for your own training videos.

Create Videos in PowerPoint: Examples

Before we get started, here’s a cool example from Duarte that Microsoft included in the PowerPoint 2010 template pack. The Duarte team created a great presentation that showed off what could be done with the new features back in PowerPoint 2010. And as you can see below, their presentation translates to video, as well.

Create Videos in PowerPoint: Slide or Slideshow?

While the example above was an entire slideshow that included some cool animations and effective transitions, you don’t need to create whole presentations. You can publish single slides, too.

And the slide doesn’t need to be normal slide content. It could be a single video. And that video can be formatted using the PowerPoint features.

That means you can insert video into a PowerPoint slide, make some simple edits, and then output that slide as a video. Pretty slick when you think about the possibilities.

And that’s the trick I want to share.

Customize Framed Videos in PowerPoint

Why do videos need to be rectangular? Why can’t they have frames or display as shapes? That’s all possible in PowerPoint.

Here are the basic steps to create framed videos in PowerPoint.

  • Insert a video on the slide.
  • Add whatever effect you want for the video.
  • Size the video to fit the slide.
  • Save the video as MP4.

Here’s a demo of some of the videos in a Rise.

Click here to view Rise demo.

As you can see, there are some neat things you can do, especially considering that you are doing all of this in PowerPoint and not required to use a more sophisticated video application.

Now it’s your turn.


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Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

 

Use PowerPoint to Create Custom Videos

custom video in PowerPoint

PowerPoint’s one of my favorite multimedia applications. It’s easy to use, almost everyone has a copy so it’s easy to share what’s created, and it does more than create presentations. In fact, I regularly use PowerPoint to create the graphics and custom assets for my e-learning courses. Here are a few examples:

As you can see, PowerPoint is great for all sorts of multimedia production especially when combined with great e-learning software.

Create a Shaped Video

Recently someone in the community asked how to create a circle-shaped video for an e-learning interaction in Storyline.

circle video in PowerPoint

A real easy solution is to create an image with a circle hole in it and then place the video underneath only allowing the video to show through the circle hole. That’s fast and doesn’t require any editing of the video.

PowerPoint circle hole over video

However, if you want a circle-shaped video, you can create one in a video editing application. This requires having a video-editing application that allows you to do that and also having the expertise to use the video editor.

And this is where PowerPoint comes in handy. It’s a tool most of use have, and it can do exactly what you need with minimal effort.

Here’s a video tutorial that quickly walks through the steps outlined below.

  • Customize slide size. A circle has a 1:1 aspect ratio. Change the custom slide size to 1:1 (something like 10″ wide and 10″ high). That should give you a video that’s almost 1000×1000 pixels.
  • Insert a video. Choose your favorite video.
  • Crop video to 1:1. Most likely the video is 16:9 or 4:3. You’ll need to crop it to 1:1 to get a perfect circle.
  • Scale the video to fill the slide. You want the video to be as big as possible inside the slide.
  • Save the file as video. Select .mp4. If you have older version of PowerPoint you may have to save as .WMV. That’s OK, you can still use it in Storyline and Rise. You won’t get a circle video. The video is still going to be rectangular. But inside the rectangle will be the custom-shaped video.

Bonus tips:

  • Play around with some of the video formatting options in PowerPoint. There are lots of neat things you can do.
  • Same thing with animations and transitions. Anything you create in your PowerPoint slides can be save as video.
  • The corners are not going to be transparent. You’ll want the video background to match the course background to get a seamless experience.

Hope that helps and is something you can use in an upcoming e-learning course.


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Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

Image already added

Creating a PowerPoint from your Adobe Captivate slides

Originally I uploaded a PowerPoint presentation into Captivate and started the process of tweaking for the video I was creating. After finishing, I was asked to send a PPT with the video then I found out exporting back out to PowerPoint was a problem. I researched and ran across a limited amount of options…none easy. However, I discovered if you use the “Edit your whole presentation in PPT” feature, you can then copy all of the slides once in the edit mode in PPT and then paste them into a new file. You can’t pull across the Notes connected to each slide, but at least all the images and slides are done super easy. Thought I’d share!

The post Creating a PowerPoint from your Adobe Captivate slides appeared first on eLearning.