How to Edit SVG Graphics in PowerPoint

edit SVG in PowerPoint

The good news is that now you can edit SVG images in PowerPoint. And that’s a big deal because we’re starting to see more SVG images every day.

In fact, one of the sites where I buy images has the option to download SVG images. This is great because they can be edited and customized. However, to edit them requires knowing how to do so with an illustration program. Unless of course, you know how to use PowerPoint.

Insert & Edit SVG Image in PowerPoint

This first step is really easy. Insert a picture by using Insert>Pictures on the toolbar. Locate your SVG image and insert it. Voila! I will add, that I’ve had a few SVG files that didn’t work, but for the most part it’s been smooth sailing.

SVG PowerPoint

The next step is also very easy. What you’ll do is convert the SVG image into an object that can be edited in PowerPoint. The newest version of PowerPoint has a “Convert to Shape” feature. If you don’t see it in your version of PowerPoint, you’ll need to upgrade to the Office 365 version.

  • Select the image
  • In the format toolbar (or via right-click) select Convert to Shape. It will ask if you want to convert it.
  • Once it’s converted, you need to ungroup the image. Right-click, and select Ungroup.
  • Now the image is broken into multiple shapes where you can edit them as you wish.

convert and edit SVG in PowerPoint

Once the image is ungrouped you can edit it. For example, I removed the background content and just isolated the guy on the computer. now I can insert it anywhere I want. You can regroup the object and right-click to save as an image. I like to save as a PNG file so that the transparent part of the image remains transparent.

edit SVG in PowerPoint computer man

How to Edit SVG in PowerPoint Video Tutorial

Here’s a video tutorial where I show how to convert and edit an SVG in PowerPoint.

Click here to watch the YouTube tutorial.

As you can see, it’s super easy to edit SVG files in PowerPoint. That should open the doors to all sorts of possibilities as you find free SVG files at those various sites that offer free stock images.


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How to Create Interactive Videos with 3D Models in Storyline

interactive video

This is part two of the series on working with 3D models and interactive video. In the previous post, we looked at how to create a video using 3D models in PowerPoint. Today, we’ll discover how to use them to create interactive videos in Storyline. And then of course, once you have an interaction you can also insert it into a Rise course, which is what I did in this Rise lesson.

Create the Interactive Videos in PowerPoint using 3D Models

If you want to create a different kind of interactive video, you can apply what you learn here. The process is similar. For this demo, make sure you understand how the video is created and how it plays all the way through because we’re going to add a trigger to pause it before it completes.

For this demo, I created a video where the object rotates in and then rotates back out. It was built using a three-slide PowerPoint file and exported as a video.

Tutorial: how to create a three-slide video using 3D models in PowerPoint.

A Teardown of the 3D Model Interactive Videos

There are a few nuanced steps in this process. Let’s review what happens and then we can look at how to create it in Storyline:

Interactive video in Storyline using 3D models in PowerPoint

  • User clicks on the side tab which shows a layer.
  • The layer plays the video we created in PowerPoint.
  • Since the 3D object in the video rotates in and out, we set the video to pause when the object is rotated in.
  • Then we add a trigger to resume the timeline (with a hotspot or button) which continues to play the video and shows the object rotate out as the video completes.
  • The completion of the media (the video) triggers the layer to hide which takes us back to the base slide with the side tabs.

Create the Interactive Videos in Storyline

The video I create in PowerPoint is the exact same aspect ratio as the Storyline file. For the most part, 16×9 is fine. But if you change the aspect ratio of your .story file make sure you do the same on the PowerPoint slide.

  • Go to slide 1 in PowerPoint and save it as a .PNG image. This image will be what the user sees on the base slide in Storyline and perfectly aligns with the videos that will be on the layers.
  • In the Storyline slide, insert the slide image from PowerPoint.
  • Create the appropriate number of layers based on how many interactive elements you have.
  • On each layer add the appropriate video. Each video should play automatically. I also recommend putting a hotspot over the video so the user can’t click on the video to start/stop it.
  • On the video layer, add a trigger to pause the video when it reaches either a certain time or cue point. I like to add cue points so I can nudge them without modifying the trigger. The video should pause at the apex of the object rotation.
  • Add a trigger to unpause the video. It could be a simple button or perhaps a hotspot.
  • Add a trigger to hide the layer when the media completes. This should take you back to the base slide.

Click here to view the tutorial on creating an interactive video.

That’s basically it. Of course, there’s a lot more you can do to decorate the layer or add additional content. It just depends on your needs. Practice the technique first and once you have it set, see what you can do.

If you do create something, please share it with us so we can see it.


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How to Create a Video with 3D Models in PowerPoint

3D models in PowerPoint

I shared a cool 3D interaction in a recent workshop demo and have had lots of people ask how I built it. You can check out the interaction in this Rise demo.

Creating the interaction is a two-step process:

  • The first step is creating a video of the 3D model as it rotates in and out.
  • The second step is to insert the video and add interactive elements in Storyline.
  • In the case of the Mars Rover module, there’s a third step because inserted the interactive Storyline module into Rise. This is pretty cool because it allows for really simple and fast authoring in Rise, and then when I need custom interactions, I just build them in Storyline. It’s a win-win.

Here’s a previous post where I detailed more of the construction of the Rise demo. For today’s post, I’ll show you how to create the 3D video you’ll use for a Storyline interaction. The tutorial below shows how to create the video using 3D models in PowerPoint.

Click here to view the tutorial on YouTube.

Insert 3D Models in PowerPoint

PowerPoint comes with a number of 3D models. It also supports inserting models shared by the community. You can also build your own 3D models and insert them using standard 3D formats

3D models in PowerPoint

Most likely you’ll want to insert your own 3D object. So it’s nice that PowerPoint supports the common 3D file formats. Here are the supported 3D formats for PowerPoint:

  • .FBX
  • .OBJ
  • .3MF
  • .PLY
  • .STL
  • .GLB

How to insert the 3D model in PowerPoint:

  • Create a slide and then select a 3D object.
  • Insert it just like you would a shape or picture.
  • Position the object on the screen.
  • Duplicate the slide (we’ll need this for the video).

Create the 3D Animation in PowerPoint

The first slide is the starting point from which the 3D object rotates. The second slide is the rotation point. You’ll need to rotate the object so that the position changes from slide 1 to slide 2. You can also move and scale it.

3D models in PowerPoint

 

  • Reposition the object by either scaling, rotating, or moving it on the slide.
  • Go to slide transitions and select a morph transition for slide 2.
  • Preview the slideshow.

3D models PowerPoint

On preview, you’ll see how the 3D object uses the morph transition to change positions. Pretty slick, huh?

Fine-tune Slide Transitions for 3D models in PowerPoint

That’s the essence of the 3D animation. Now it’s a matter of fine-tuning the animation by playing with the slide timings.

When all is done, the PowerPoint slides will be saved as a video file. That means the animations and transitions need to be automated.

3D models in PowerPoint 3D PowerPoint morph transition timing

  • In the Transitions tab, go to Advance Slide and select to advance after X time. That means the slide will automatically advance at a certain time and doesn’t require you to do anything to trigger the slide movement.
  • Slide 1 is just the starting point so it needs to advance as quickly as possible. I usually set it to advance after .25 seconds.
  • Slide 2 will trigger the morph animation. On slide 2 you can change the speed of the 3D animation by changing the slide duration.
  • Slide 3 (optional) is great if you want to create the sense that the object rotated in and out like the Mars Rover demo.

Save the PowerPoint file as a Video

When all is done, save the PowerPoint file as a video. You have two options: .MP4 and .WMV.

The MP4 format works well but I did find that when I use it with Storyline, the last part of the .MP4 always seems jumpy. It probably has to do with how the .MP4 is encoded by PowerPoint. So if I am using the video to build an interactive file, I save it as a .WMV. Then I let Storyline do the conversion. That resolves any issues you may experience.

That’s basically it for the 3D model video in PowerPoint. You create the two or three slides and save as video. Once you have the video, you can insert it into Storyline or anywhere else you use video. To make it an interactive video like I did with the 3D rover, you’ll need to tune in next week where I show how to create an interactive video in Storyline.


Download the fully revised, free 63-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

Upcoming E-Learning Events

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Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

PowerPoint, Meters, and States – Oh My!

PowerPoint sometimes gets a bad rap but I truly believe in the ‘power’ that PowerPoint has available.

In this post, I wanted to share with you one of the ways I use PowerPoint to supplement what I want to accomplish in Adobe Captivate.

Meters

I love using meters in my activities. Whether that is a progress meter or some sort of indication of success, meters can be a great way to inform the learner of how they are doing. There are tons of possibilities with your creative touch – nothing is off the table at this point.

I use PowerPoint regularly as my graphics editor and making meters is a task I do often. I find it to be very simple to create and manipulate the shapes to get the outcome I need. In this example, I will make a simple meter that tracks time in 5 minute increments. These increment images become image states in Captivate which display based on your variable values and logic. This post will address the methodology of creating the images rather than working out the logic.

**Please note that this is not a live timer but a meter that will change based on variables that you assign and are updated as a learner makes choices.

**Also note that I duplicate slides at each step. This helps the creation but also helps when mistakes are made – less things to fix.

 

Creating the Images (Clock Style)

Step 1  –  Make a circle shape. You can ensure the circle is round rather than oval by holding the shift key while you drag it out. Color the circle to your design. In this example I will use a light red color. This is the color that will reveal as “time passes”.

slide1

 

Step 2  –  Make a very thin rectangle shape and center it on the circle. I use a good contrasting color so it is easy to find.

slide2

 

Step 3  –  Make as many copies of the thin rectangle as you need to segment the meter into the number of divisions you desire. Make sure they are all centered. Then rotate all of the rectangles based on the number segments so they are all equal. In this example, I created a total of six rectangles so I could have 12 equal segments representing 5 minutes each. (360 degrees / 12 = 30 degrees) I rotated the remaining 5 rectangles by an increasing 30 degrees for each one.

slide3

 

Step 4  –  Select all of the objects making sure that you select your circle first so that your formatting remains. Then fragment them. You should notice a change to the rectangles based on the formatting of the circle.

fragment

slide4

 

Step 5  –  Make a copy of the first circle and reformat it to the color of the timer. In this example, I am going with a greyish-white. It is important to remind you that I have been duplicating slides at each step. This helps ensure that all my objects stay in the exact same position. This is critical for the next phase of this setup as we will be copying and pasting from one slide to another and that keeps them properly placed.

At this stage you can perform a right-click and ‘Save as Picture’. This will be the starting of your image states in Captivate.

slide5

saveAsPic

 

Step 6  –  Go back to your fragmented slide. Select the first segment and copy it (CTRL-C). Go to the slide with the circle you just made and re-colored. Paste the segment (CTRL-V). It should appear in the same spot. Group them by selecting everything and (CTRL-G) then save as picture again. This will be your next state.

Now ungroup them (CTRL + SHIFT + G) and go back to the fragment slide to grab the next piece. Paste the next one in place, group, and save as picture.

Repeat the procedure until you have created images of each step of the meter.

slide6

slide7

slide8

 

Step 7  –  Now you can import each of the images to Captivate and you could use either the blank circle as a start point or the full circle  where segments disappear. Each image is a state that you can utilize the ChangeState function of Captivate to display them based on parameters that you choose.

 

Here is a pic of my version of this in one of my applications. In the scenario where this is used, I give the learner “two hours” to perform the task. Each decision they make along the way costs them “time”. The meter fills up to show how much “time” has been spent on the task.  As you can see, I added a few additional elements to this one such as the little hand that follows along like a clock and the numbers as well to help read the time.

PowerPoint is a really useful tool that makes creating these sorts of things very easy and is an amazing supplement to Captivate.

Hopefully this was helpful for someone. Feel free to ask questions about this.

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WEBINAR RECORDING: PART 2 – How to turn a linear PowerPoint Presentation into an immersive, interactive Adobe Captivate project.

During our most recent webinar, we shared some insights on how to turn a linear PowerPoint presentation into an interactive Captivate project, with the great mystery of the ‘green tick’ revealed!

Let’s pick up where we left off, building upon these concepts and showing you how to:

  • Use Shared Actions for accelerated deployment of section completion actions
  • Incorporate questions into each section
  • Utilise Adobe Captivate frames to navigate straight to a specific part of the slide
  • Display a final call to action on the menu slide to bypass the completed actions and finish the module

You can watch the Part 1 webinar recording here. 

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More Captivate tips and advice at www.learningplan.com.au

WEBINAR RECORDING: PART 1 – How to turn a linear PowerPoint Presentation into an immersive, interactive Adobe Captivate project.

 

Creating Adobe Captivate from PowerPoint is just one way to fast track your eLearning development.

If an Instructional Designer or SME has created a PowerPoint, you can easily import the PowerPoint into Adobe Captivate, but that’s just the beginning.

What if you want to add interactivity, quizzes or non-linear progression?

Using Adobe Captivate’s built-in quiz functionality combined with a splash of Advanced Actions, you can take your Imported PowerPoint to a whole new level ready to deploy to your Learning Management System or web server.

___

More Captivate tips and advice at www.learningplan.com.au

[WEBINAR] PART 2 – How to turn a linear PowerPoint Presentation into an immersive, interactive Adobe Captivate project.

From PowerPoint to eLearning – It’s your turn to be a hero!

Date: Tuesday, October 31st (Australia/New Zealand/APAC)

Time: 11 am (Australian EDT) / 1 pm (NZ)

During our most recent webinar, we shared some insights on how to turn a linear PowerPoint presentation into an interactive Captivate project, with the great mystery of the ‘green tick’ revealed!

If you’re interested in revisiting that webinar – here’s a link to the recording.

Let’s pick up where we left off.

In our next webinar on Tuesday 31st October, we’re going to build upon these concepts and show you how to:

  • Use Shared Actions for accelerated deployment of section completion actions
  • Incorporate questions into each section
  • Utilise Adobe Captivate frames to navigate straight to a specific part of the slide
  • Display a final call to action on the menu slide to bypass the completed actions and finish the module

Using Adobe Captivate’s built-in quiz functionality combined with a splash of Advanced Actions, you can take your Imported PowerPoints to a whole new level ready to deploy to your Learning Management System or web server.

 

How to Create a PowerPoint Presentation from your Adobe Captivate Project

Adobe Captivate allows a simple way to print your Captivate slides to a Microsoft Word document, however there may be times when you are required to create a Microsoft PowerPoint deck of the Captivate slides.

So how do we get the Captivate slides into PowerPoint, without individually taking a screenshot of each slide?

Fortunately we can use a simple trick in Microsoft Word which will allow us to extract the “screenshots” of the slides that Captivate creates when printing to the Word document.

We do this by saving the Word document as an HTML file.

Follow these 3 easy steps to export your Captivate slides into a PowerPoint presentation.

1. Print your Adobe Captivate project: File > Print

 

 

 

 

 

2. Open up the Word document that is generated, and from within Word Save As > Web Page (HTML)

 

 

 

 

 

When creating an HTML version of a Word document, word creates a separate folder to store the images (HTML documents don’t have images actually embedded in the document, like a Word document)

3. In PowerPoint, Insert > Photo Album, and select the images from the folder that Word created

 

 

 

 

 

There you have it, Adobe Captivate to MS PowerPoint in 3 easy steps!

For further instructions, watch this below video:

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More Captivate tips and advice at www.learningplan.com.au

[WEBINAR] How to turn a linear PowerPoint Presentation into an immersive, interactive Adobe Captivate project.

webinar-banner

Date: Wednesday, October 18th (Australia/New Zealand/APAC)

Time: 11 am (Australian EDT) / 1 pm (NZ)

Screen Shot 2017-06-30 at 4.55.29 PM

From PowerPoint to eLearning – It’s your turn to be a hero!

Let’s say you’ve put together a pretty impressive PowerPoint presentation. Your boss loves you and can’t get enough of your slide transitions. Good times – for now.

Now Gavin joins your team. He’s impressed by slide transitions but is looking for more interactivity. How do you impress him? Easy!

Join the Learning Plan webinar on Wednesday, October 18th (11 am AEST / 1 pm NZ) where you’ll learn how to convert (once-awesome) PowerPoint presentations into an engaging eLearning project, developed in Adobe Captivate.

Be a hero to Gavin in just 45 minutes. He’ll remember you as a hero forever!

Creating Adobe Captivate from PowerPoint is just one way to fast track your eLearning development.

If an Instructional Designer or SME has created a PowerPoint, you can easily import the PowerPoint into Adobe Captivate, but that’s just the beginning. What if you want to add interactivity, quizzes or non-linear progression?

Using Adobe Captivate’s built-in quiz functionality combined with a splash of Advanced Actions, you can take your Imported PowerPoints to a whole new level ready to deploy to your Learning Management System or web server.

Key Takeaways: 

  • Rapid development utilising existing content
  • Quickly update content in PowerPoint without SMEs needing to access Adobe Captivate

Who should attend:

  • eLearning Developers
  • SMEs providing developers with content in PowerPoint
  • L&D consultants who may need to create eLearning from time to time
  • eLearning Specialists working with Marketing presentations for product launches

Our presenter

John Stericker John is an Adobe Captivate Certified Expert and Adobe Certified Instructor with over 20 years experience designing and developing e-learning and IT training.

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Register here: http://learningplan.com.au/event/webinar-turn-linear-powerpoint-presentation-immersive-interactive-adobe-captivate-project/

Essential PowerPoint Animations Tips

PowerPoint animation tips

I’ve been reviewing a lot of the older PowerPoint tutorials that I’ve posted in the past. Most are still relevant, but a few have changed. In this post, we’ll do a refresh on the basics on PowerPoint animations.

PowerPoint Animation Basics

There are four types of animations in PowerPoint:

  • Entrance: object comes on to the slide
  • Exit: object leaves the slide
  • Emphasis: object remains in place, but animates to provide emphasis or become a focal point
  • Motion path: object follows a drawn path.

powerpoint animation panel

When selecting animations, keep in mind that there are additional animation choices at the bottom of the selection panel. And not all animations are supported when converted for e-learning. And one last tip, because you can animate doesn’t mean you should.

Triggering PowerPoint Animations

Animations are generally triggered by three things:

  • On click: object doesn’t animate until mouse click triggers the animation. This is what you need if you’re syncing animations with narration for your e-learning courses.
  • With previous: object animates with the previous animation. It also animates automatically if it’s the first object on the screen.
  • After previous: object animates after the previous animation.

When you select an animation and when it should start, you also have the option to set its duration and whether to delay or not. Once you understand how to time animations, you can compound them and create all sorts of effects.

You can also set triggers in PowerPoint to animate on other actions, such as clicking on a shape. These work great in PowerPoint by itself but are something I’d avoid when converting PowerPoint slides to an e-learning course.

PowerPoint Animation Pane

The PowerPoint animation pane gives you more control of the PowerPoint animations.

  • You can see the stacking order of animated objects.
  • How the objects are timed to the timeline.
  • Clicking on the drop down arrow exposes more advanced PowerPoint animation options such as start/stop effects and timing.

powerpoint-animation-panel

PowerPoint Animation Painter

You can add multiple animations to a single object. This allows you to create all sorts of complex animations. However, this can also be a time-consuming process. One production tip is to use the animation painter to copy animations from one object to another. This is especially useful if you need to repeat an animation on a different object.

powerpoint animation painter

Here are a Couple of Bonus Tips

When using motion paths, select one of the pre-built motion paths rather than drawing your own. You’ll end up with fewer edit points which will make the animation along the path much smoother. If you do need to draw a custom path, use the curved shape tool and edit the points.

PowerPoint animation motion path edit points

Use the selection pane [Home>Select>Selection Pane] to edit the names of the objects on the slide. It makes it a lot easier to understand what’s happening in the animation pane.

powerpooint animation selection pane

Here are some cool PowerPoint animation tutorials as well as a bunch more. They should spur all sorts of ideas.

Once you understand the basics of PowerPoint animations you’ll be able to create virtually anything you want and build e-learning courses in PowerPoint that won’t give away that they were created in PowerPoint.

Do you have any PowerPoint animation tips?


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  • Articulate Roadshows. Join us for one or two days of e-learning goodness. Day 1 focuses on more general e-learning topics and Day 2 is centered on learning to build some nice, reusable interactions. They're great activities to help you learn more about the tools. Sign up using the links below. Seats are limited for the events. If you're interested in presenting at one of the roadshows, let me know.
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  • There are a couple of other events planned. Once we get all of the bookings confirmed, we'll add the registration page and info.

 

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.