‘Information Is Water’: A Metaphor To Show How Our Educational Technology Must Radically Change

Imagine information is water, a metaphor that I posit will illustrate how our educational technology must radically change in the future. I describe historical periods using this metaphor and explore ways educational technology must innovate to address today's educational challenges. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

5 Innovative Digital Tools For Teachers To Use

If you are an educator or a teacher that never stops evolving, then you could definitely find this article of use. We will discuss how you can improve your lessons using 5 innovative and entertaining tools that your students will love. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

A Distance Learning Checklist: Some Key Considerations

This paper draws on extensive managerial experience in distance learning and Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) in higher education. The various key-issue assertions and recommendations that are made in this paper may resonate with a wide practitioner audience. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Introducing SCALE: The Student-Centered Adaptive Learning Environment

SCALE is an interactive platform for delivering adaptive instruction online. It works with standard Learning Management Systems to provide an instructional framework that guides the learner through the instructional content based on proven theories about how people learn effectively. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

How U.S. Legal Education Fits In K-12 eLearning Courses

In the U.S. public education system, the subject of U.S. law rarely takes center stage. As a result, many high school students receive their diplomas without having a solid understanding of their civic rights and requirements. How can teachers resolve this? This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Recommended Research: Constructivism & Learning Technology

Last week, we had an awesome virtual class on how to implement an effective gamification strategy within a corporate learning environment!  Here is the recording and slideshare.

In class, we briefly touched on some learning theories and research related to constructivism and the effective use of technology, games and gamification within the overall learning environment.  I’ve been reading a lot of articles recently that relate to constructivism, and some of our attendees were interested in receiving a list of those resources.  Below are a few reading suggestions.

I’ll create more recommended reading lists, so follow me if this sort of thing is useful to you.  The next blog posts will probably be devoted to virtual and augmented reality resources.  (If you haven’t checked out the crazy cool VR features in Adobe Captivate 2019, please take a look!)  I will also post my own summaries of select articles over the next few weeks.

Please add your own suggested reading articles in the comments section!

Here are three introductory level readings that are great as starters:

A great explanation of what constructivism is, what helps us learn, and what learning truly is.

An in-depth look at the learning process from beginning to end, including how to use educational technology (and how not to use it), and the importance of social learning and collaboration.

An overview of the types of educational technology available for use in the learning environment, as well as a historical perspective of how that technology has evolved.

I just finished working my way through the below articles, many of which are referenced by the above chapters, and cross-referenced amongst each other:

  1. Shaffer, D. W., Squire, K., Halverson, R., & Gee, J. P. (2005). Video games and the future of learning. Phi Delta Kappan, 87, 104–111. Google Scholar
  2. Shuler, C. (2009). Pockets of potential: Using mobile technologies to promote children’s learning. New York, NY: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop. Google Scholar
  3. Thomas, M., & Brown, J. S. (2011). A new culture of learning: Cultivating the imagination for a world of constant change. Lexington, KY: CreateSpace. Google Scholar
  4. Van Eck, R. (2006). Digital game-based learning: It’s not just the digital natives who are restless. EDUCAUSE Review, 41(2), 16–30. Google Scholar
  5. Vavoula, G., Sharples, M., Lonsdale, P., Rudman, P., & Meek, J. (2007). Learning bridges: Mobile technologies in education. Educational Technology, 47(3), 33–37. Google Scholar

More articles and article summaries coming soon.  Please follow my posts if you’d like to see more!

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