Negotiate Your Learning Management System (LMS) Contract

Congratulations, you’ve gone through the process of selecting the perfect learning management system vendor for your learning and development organization! All that stands between you and that beautiful piece of learning technology is the vendor contract, and the associated price tag.

During one of my conference sessions last year, I was asked whether it’s possible to negotiate the price of an LMS. And the answer is – absolutely you can! Buying technology is somewhat similar to buying a car. It’s a big investment, and you can negotiate many elements of the contract with your vendor, particularly the cost.

As the video states, it’s important to know exactly what you are paying for. If the vendor gives you a “lump sum” for your three-year contract, have them break it out so you see the line items that contribute to the overall cost. You may be able to strike features and services you don’t need, or negotiate a lower cost for some of the line items. Also discuss payment schedules. Can you get a lower overall price if you pay more up front, for example?

Most importantly, don’t be afraid to ask questions and propose changes to the contract! It’s a critical part of your LMS selection process, and your learning technology vendor should be willing to collaborate with you. Contract negotiation is the exciting last step of your LMS selection process, and it signals the beginning of your LMS implementation!

Information in this video and post is taken from my book LMS Success.  Please subscribe to Learn Tech Collective for more LMS and e-learning videos.  Follow me on Twitter or connect on LinkedIn.

The post Negotiate Your Learning Management System (LMS) Contract appeared first on eLearning.

Trends in Training & Learning Management (Includes Webinar Recording & Slides)

On November 21, I facilitated a discussion of major trends in learning and development.  Fun and data was had by all, thanks to our awesome audience from around the world!

If you would like to check out the full session recording, click here.  The description is below.  And here are the slides:

Join Adobe’s Senior Learning Evangelist Katrina Marie Baker for this lively conversation about the latest trends in training & development. Based on recent studies and research, the session will explore what people are doing in organizations around the world, and how organizations can achieve great results with modern learning programs.

Katrina will discuss the:

  • Impetus behind creating and developing virtual universities
  • Growing demand to encourage learner immersion and ongoing engagement
  • Rise of mobile learning
  • Role of skill-based learning in business training
  • Use of gamification for learner engagement and motivation
  • Ongoing expectations of learners for video
  • Proving the value of your learning program through more relevant reporting

The post Trends in Training & Learning Management (Includes Webinar Recording & Slides) appeared first on eLearning.

Task List for Your Learning Management System (LMS) Implementation

***If you’d like to attend a free webinar on how to implement your LMS, join me tomorrow!***

Quite a few of us hear the words “learning management system implementation” and run for the hills. It’s natural to be afraid of taking on a project that is totally outside of your normal, everyday function. No need to worry – implementing an LMS is absolutely something you can do.

The most critical part of any LMS implementation is your project plan. Make sure you have a basic understanding of LMS administration. Break your implementation into individual tasks, and assign timelines and responsible parties. Work closely with your LMS vendor. They often provide a partial timeline you can use as a starting point. (In the case of Adobe Captivate Prime, you work through tasks with an LMS customer success manager.)

Down below, I’ve provided a list of implementation tasks from my book, LMS Success. Depending on the organization, some of these tasks will be very important, and others won’t apply. Pull the appropriate tasks into Excel or Project, assign start and end dates for each task, and determine who will be responsible for its completion.  (Those who purchase LMS Success or The LMS Selection Checklist get a bundle of supplementary resources, including an Excel workbook of implementation tasks.)

You may want to further divide some tasks into smaller pieces, or create workflows. It depends on the project size and how complex your implementation will be. You can also group tasks by dividing your implementation into five phases, like this:

1: Before vendor is selected  |  2: After vendor is selected  |  3: During contract negotiations  |  4: Before go-live  |  5: After go-live

The task list below is a starting point – not a prescribed plan.  I’ve led or consulted on 30+ implementations, and I change the task list every time.  Also note that some tasks do not directly pertain to the LMS. Many organizations take their LMS implementation as an opportunity to restructure their training department, so you’ll see some of those elements as well.

© Katrina Marie Baker, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from the author is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be used, provided that full credit is given to Katrina Marie Baker with specific direction to LMS Success.

In order to assign compliance and other critical courses in the new LMS…

  1. Create a list of compliance courses required of all personnel.
  2. Create a list of compliance courses required for specific regions or countries.
  3. Create a list of compliance courses required for specific personnel.
  4. For all compliance courses – is completion required one time or on a recurring basis?
  5. Standardize classes provided to new hires.
  6. Create a list reflecting courses, personnel to receive them, and whether courses should be automatically assigned based on a set of rules (assuming your LMS does this).
  7. Do you want a standard group of courses to be pushed to personnel on their hire date? Or three months after they’ve joined? Or every year during their employment?
  8. Should compliance courses be maintained in paper formats as an alternative, in case of a system failure?

To assemble your course catalog…

  1. Are there any courses in your current LMS that should not be transferred to the new LMS?
  2. Determine names for all course categories and subcategories.
  3. Compare existing courses and determine which are similar enough to be merged when you migrate to the new LMS. (Many organizations have courses that have been added multiple times to their LMS. Might as well clean that up.)
  4. Mark corporate events and other non-training courses in the course catalog spreadsheet so they can be categorized appropriately and/or eliminated. (A lot of organizations use their LMS as an event management system. This can really clutter your course catalog.)
  5. Correct categories, subcategories, delivery, and course unit types for all courses, on a spreadsheet.
  6. Determine course catalog import structure. (Ask your new LMS vendor about this.)
  7. Should courses in all languages be displayed in the same catalog? In multiple catalogs?
  8. Assign college levels (100 level, 200 level, and so on) so curricula are assigned in an appropriate order.

Some general administrative tasks (in addition to those provided by your LMS vendor)…

  1. Decide how many administrator levels are needed, with associated permissions. (Questions about how to do this or any other tasks? Just comment below.)
  2. Create a list of tasks each level of administrator will complete.
  3. Decide on lead administrators for each department, if your organization is large.
  4. Determine a “regular chores” list for administrators.
  5. Create an LMS support email address that routes to the correct admins.
  6. Will IT have any administrator role in the new LMS?
  7. Determine what inbound/outbound system feeds need to run to the LMS. Maybe your HRIS?
  8. Decide on a go-live date for the LMS.
  9. Discuss GDPR and ADA 508 compliance.
  10. Run test batch import of all data types, such as course history, user information, and so on. (Ask your LMS vendor for advice.)
  11. After running successful test batches, import all data. Test to confirm success.
  12. Discuss whether interface should be offered in multiple languages.
  13. Create course equivalencies.
  14. Exploration of the benefits of xAPI, and how it can be effectively introduced.
  15. Get administrator tip sheets from vendor, if possible.
  16. Discuss how to utilize assessments and surveys more effectively.
  17. Schedule super administrator training with new LMS vendor.
  18. Explore security features and any national or international regulations pertaining to the data in your LMS.
  19. Negotiate contract.
  20. Negotiate SLA.
  21. Decide when to cut over from your old LMS to the new LMS.
  22. Communicate that cut-over plan to your end users.
  23. Decide on the URL for the new LMS.
  24. Replace links to the old LMS with links to the new one.
  25. Train administrators on new system processes.
  26. Begin weekly recorded webinars on LMS administration targeted for different admin levels.
  27. Begin bi-weekly LMS “office hours,” to assist your LMS administrators with data entry and basic questions.
  28. Develop how-to videos for common LMS user/administrator tasks.
  29. Evaluate your organization’s training data entry procedure and streamline it. (Make sure your trainers track their classroom sessions and attendees in the LMS.)
  30. Test user interface prior to go-live. (Have lots of people test it. Try to break it.)
  31. Test class scheduling functionality.
  32. Test learning tracks or paths, and reports.
  33. Test upload of courses.
  34. Test EVERYTHING.
  35. Allow extra time to troubleshoot.
  36. Run a test of the system backup, if there is one.
  37. Run a test upgrade.
  38. System FAQ documents for members of your IT department as well as end users. (Definitely explain how to reset a user password, if passwords are required!)
  39. Review current third-party course vendors. Are they cost-effective?

Marketing and design tasks…

  1. Determine a name for the new LMS.
  2. Create an LMS logo.
  3. Determine a multi-tier marketing plan for different employee levels.
  4. Draft the look of the user interface.
  5. Add gamification elements, if needed.
  6. Create an LMS introductory video, emails, or posters to help you internally market the system.

What tasks would you add to this list?  Comment below!  Connect with me on Twitter or LinkedIn.

© Katrina Marie Baker, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from the author is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be used, provided that full credit is given to Katrina Baker with specific direction to LMS Success.

The post Task List for Your Learning Management System (LMS) Implementation appeared first on eLearning.

Task List for Your Learning Management System (LMS) Implementation

***If you’d like to attend a free webinar on how to implement your LMS, join me tomorrow!***

Quite a few of us hear the words “learning management system implementation” and run for the hills. It’s natural to be afraid of taking on a project that is totally outside of your normal, everyday function. No need to worry – implementing an LMS is absolutely something you can do.

The most critical part of any LMS implementation is your project plan. Make sure you have a basic understanding of LMS administration. Break your implementation into individual tasks, and assign timelines and responsible parties. Work closely with your LMS vendor. They often provide a partial timeline you can use as a starting point. (In the case of Adobe Captivate Prime, you work through tasks with an LMS customer success manager.)

Down below, I’ve provided a list of implementation tasks from my book, LMS Success. Depending on the organization, some of these tasks will be very important, and others won’t apply. Pull the appropriate tasks into Excel or Project, assign start and end dates for each task, and determine who will be responsible for its completion.  (Those who purchase LMS Success or The LMS Selection Checklist get a bundle of supplementary resources, including an Excel workbook of implementation tasks.)

You may want to further divide some tasks into smaller pieces, or create workflows. It depends on the project size and how complex your implementation will be. You can also group tasks by dividing your implementation into five phases, like this:

1: Before vendor is selected  |  2: After vendor is selected  |  3: During contract negotiations  |  4: Before go-live  |  5: After go-live

The task list below is a starting point – not a prescribed plan.  I’ve led or consulted on 30+ implementations, and I change the task list every time.  Also note that some tasks do not directly pertain to the LMS. Many organizations take their LMS implementation as an opportunity to restructure their training department, so you’ll see some of those elements as well.

© Katrina Marie Baker, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from the author is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be used, provided that full credit is given to Katrina Marie Baker with specific direction to LMS Success.

In order to assign compliance and other critical courses in the new LMS…

  1. Create a list of compliance courses required of all personnel.
  2. Create a list of compliance courses required for specific regions or countries.
  3. Create a list of compliance courses required for specific personnel.
  4. For all compliance courses – is completion required one time or on a recurring basis?
  5. Standardize classes provided to new hires.
  6. Create a list reflecting courses, personnel to receive them, and whether courses should be automatically assigned based on a set of rules (assuming your LMS does this).
  7. Do you want a standard group of courses to be pushed to personnel on their hire date? Or three months after they’ve joined? Or every year during their employment?
  8. Should compliance courses be maintained in paper formats as an alternative, in case of a system failure?

To assemble your course catalog…

  1. Are there any courses in your current LMS that should not be transferred to the new LMS?
  2. Determine names for all course categories and subcategories.
  3. Compare existing courses and determine which are similar enough to be merged when you migrate to the new LMS. (Many organizations have courses that have been added multiple times to their LMS. Might as well clean that up.)
  4. Mark corporate events and other non-training courses in the course catalog spreadsheet so they can be categorized appropriately and/or eliminated. (A lot of organizations use their LMS as an event management system. This can really clutter your course catalog.)
  5. Correct categories, subcategories, delivery, and course unit types for all courses, on a spreadsheet.
  6. Determine course catalog import structure. (Ask your new LMS vendor about this.)
  7. Should courses in all languages be displayed in the same catalog? In multiple catalogs?
  8. Assign college levels (100 level, 200 level, and so on) so curricula are assigned in an appropriate order.

Some general administrative tasks (in addition to those provided by your LMS vendor)…

  1. Decide how many administrator levels are needed, with associated permissions. (Questions about how to do this or any other tasks? Just comment below.)
  2. Create a list of tasks each level of administrator will complete.
  3. Decide on lead administrators for each department, if your organization is large.
  4. Determine a “regular chores” list for administrators.
  5. Create an LMS support email address that routes to the correct admins.
  6. Will IT have any administrator role in the new LMS?
  7. Determine what inbound/outbound system feeds need to run to the LMS. Maybe your HRIS?
  8. Decide on a go-live date for the LMS.
  9. Discuss GDPR and ADA 508 compliance.
  10. Run test batch import of all data types, such as course history, user information, and so on. (Ask your LMS vendor for advice.)
  11. After running successful test batches, import all data. Test to confirm success.
  12. Discuss whether interface should be offered in multiple languages.
  13. Create course equivalencies.
  14. Exploration of the benefits of xAPI, and how it can be effectively introduced.
  15. Get administrator tip sheets from vendor, if possible.
  16. Discuss how to utilize assessments and surveys more effectively.
  17. Schedule super administrator training with new LMS vendor.
  18. Explore security features and any national or international regulations pertaining to the data in your LMS.
  19. Negotiate contract.
  20. Negotiate SLA.
  21. Decide when to cut over from your old LMS to the new LMS.
  22. Communicate that cut-over plan to your end users.
  23. Decide on the URL for the new LMS.
  24. Replace links to the old LMS with links to the new one.
  25. Train administrators on new system processes.
  26. Begin weekly recorded webinars on LMS administration targeted for different admin levels.
  27. Begin bi-weekly LMS “office hours,” to assist your LMS administrators with data entry and basic questions.
  28. Develop how-to videos for common LMS user/administrator tasks.
  29. Evaluate your organization’s training data entry procedure and streamline it. (Make sure your trainers track their classroom sessions and attendees in the LMS.)
  30. Test user interface prior to go-live. (Have lots of people test it. Try to break it.)
  31. Test class scheduling functionality.
  32. Test learning tracks or paths, and reports.
  33. Test upload of courses.
  34. Test EVERYTHING.
  35. Allow extra time to troubleshoot.
  36. Run a test of the system backup, if there is one.
  37. Run a test upgrade.
  38. System FAQ documents for members of your IT department as well as end users. (Definitely explain how to reset a user password, if passwords are required!)
  39. Review current third-party course vendors. Are they cost-effective?

Marketing and design tasks…

  1. Determine a name for the new LMS.
  2. Create an LMS logo.
  3. Determine a multi-tier marketing plan for different employee levels.
  4. Draft the look of the user interface.
  5. Add gamification elements, if needed.
  6. Create an LMS introductory video, emails, or posters to help you internally market the system.

What tasks would you add to this list?  Comment below!  Connect with me on Twitter or LinkedIn.

© Katrina Marie Baker, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from the author is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be used, provided that full credit is given to Katrina Baker with specific direction to LMS Success.

The post Task List for Your Learning Management System (LMS) Implementation appeared first on eLearning.

Accessibly in Adobe Captivate

It’s a big day today in the world of accessibility, as the W3C today introduced the latest update to WCAG Standards. These are the guidelines used to ensure that content and software accommodates the needs of diverse audiences. The new standard augments the previous set (version 2.0) and is given the new version number (2.1.)  You can read all about it in this fantastic overview from Andrew Kirkpatrick, Adobe’s Group Product Manager for Accessibly.

You may at this point find yourself wondering, what’s the difference between WCAG Standards and 508 Standards for Accessiblity. Here’s a handy comparison chart – at least for WCAG 2.0 Standards comparison. In a nutshell, the WCAG standards are more extensive.

I am often asked how accessibility works in Adobe Captivate.  You’ll find a number of great resources right here on the forum (Like this one & this one from justenuf2bdangerous) that can guide you through the process of adding Closed Captions, or adding names and descriptions for screen readers to content in Captivate.  If you’re looking for some more advanced options, check out this very cool walk through of a JavaScript based popup solution complete with custom accessibility enhancements from sdwarwick of eLearningOcean.

Here is the Captivate overview that I find the most useful.  You’ll notice that the linked overview includes both information about how Captivate meets Accessibility standards, and how to setup / configure accessibility within your projects.

How are you using accessibility standards in Captivate? Which articles have you found the most useful as you implement your solutions?

 

The post Accessibly in Adobe Captivate appeared first on eLearning.

How do I change my profile name and image?

Due to recent changes in Adobe’s data protection policies, we had switched the privacy settings to Private. You can, however, switch it back to the previous state. Setting the name to Public makes your profile name more meaningful, and is easier to share the profile link with your name with prospective clients and employers.

Changing your profile image is easy. Follow the steps below:

Switch to Public profile

To the right of the page, click User Profile.

On the menu that appears, click Settings.

To change the privacy settings, choose the option Public.

To save the changes, click Save.

Edit your profile name

After you’ve changed the privacy settings, follow the steps below to change the name of your profile.

On your profile drop-down list, click your name.

To the bottom-right of the screen, click the button, as shown below. You can now change your profile name and this name will be displayed throughout the portal.

To save your changes, click Save.

Make your profile picture visible

Go to Captivate forum.

On the page, click your user avatar, and then click Edit Communities Profile.

In the Avatar section, click Add another avatar.

Choose a photo that you’d like to represent as your avatar.

You can then upload the photo and crop it accordingly.

After you’ve uploaded your avatar, click Finished.

NOTE: It may take a while for your avatar to get approved.

The post How do I change my profile name and image? appeared first on eLearning.

New Book on Presenter 11

Big congrats to Kevin Siegel and Jennie Ruby, for the recent publication of his their new book on Presenter 11.  If Kevin’s name sounds familiar, you may recognize him from his acclaimed project estimation tool – a very cool widget that let’s you calculate / project project costs for eLearning.

This book covers Presenter 11 in solid detail. It approaches the material topically, providing a solid foundation in everything from audio to video and nicely includes quizzing and reporting alongside interactive smart learning components. You can check out the book at the link below.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1944607250/

Congrats again, Kevin and Jennie.

 

Die Corporate Learning Community in 2018

Das ist auch ein Beitrag in eigener Sache: Das Kernteam der Corporate Learning Community hat am Montag in Nürnberg getagt und einige Weichen für das laufende Jahr gestellt. Im Kern soll es ein Zusammenspiel aus den regionalen Communities, die gerade überall in Deutschland entstehen, und dem Corporate Learning Camp geben, das am 4./5. Oktober in seine achte Auflage geht. Hinzu kommen 2018 monatliche Corporate Learning Sprints, also Thementage, die das Jahr über noch einmal inhaltliche Schwerpunkte setzen sollen. Die Termine stehen, einige Ideen und Aufgaben müssen noch ausformuliert, Themen noch gefunden werden. Weitere Punkte im Beitrag von Karlheinz Pape. Einfach dranbleiben!
Karlheinz Pape, Corporate Learning Community, 17. Januar 2018

How Independent Bookstores Have Thrived in Spite of Amazon.com

Der überraschende Befund: „Between 2009 and 2015, the ABA [American Booksellers Association] reported a 35 percent growth in the number of independent booksellers, from 1,651 stores to 2,227.“ Ryan Raffaelli (Harvard Business School) hat sich auf eine umfassende Spurensuche begeben. Nach Auswertung seiner Feldstudien sieht er die Ursache für das Wiederaufleben der Buchläden in den “3 C’s”:

  • community: „Independent booksellers were some of the first to champion the idea of localism; … by stressing a strong connection to local community values.“
  • curation: „Independent booksellers began to focus on curating inventory that allowed them to provide a more personal and specialized customer experience. …“
  • convening: „Independent booksellers also started to promote their stores as intellectual centers for convening customers with likeminded interests—offering lectures, book signings, game nights, children’s story times, young adult reading groups, even birthday parties. …“

Verstärkend kam hinzu, dass die ABA den Erfahrungsaustausch der Independent Booksellers aktiv unterstützte. Das Resümee des Feldforschers dürfte auch die Buchhandlungen, Bibliotheken und Volkshochschulen hierzulande interessieren:

“The theoretical and managerial lessons we can learn from independent bookstores have implications for a wide array of traditional brick-and-mortar businesses facing technological change,” Raffaelli says. “But this has been an especially fascinating industry to study because indie booksellers provide us with a story of hope.”

Carmen Nobel, Harvard Business School/ Working Knowledge, 20. November 2017

Bildquelle: Pj Accetturo (Unsplash)

Corporate Learning Camp 2017 (#cl17)

Es ist schon fast wieder Geschichte, das 7. Corporate Learning Camp, das letzte Woche in Frankfurt stattgefunden hat. Dieses Mal mit fast 300 Teilnehmenden/ Teilgebenden und fast 70 Sessions, die von ihnen angeboten wurden. Das schließt eigentlich eine Zusammenfassung aus, und so will ich nur auf einige Themen verlinken, die mir auf dem Camp begegnet sind.

Vorneweg: Eigentlich bietet das Camp längst Stoff für unzählige Master-Arbeiten, wenn ich nur an die Stichworte „Vernetzung“ (Was könnte uns eigentlich die Social Network Analysis über das Netzwerk der Teilnehmenden erzählen?) oder „Themen-Sessions“ (Welche Inhalte und Formen des Austauschs werden eigentlich angeboten?) denke …

Simon Dückert hatte auf dem Camp ein kleines Podcast-Studio aufgebaut und interessierte Teilnehmende eingeladen, selbst einen Beitrag zu produzieren. So ist eine kleine Podcast-Reihe entstanden, die auf der Webseite der Corporate Learning Community verlinkt ist.Ich habe einmal in den Beitrag „LMS am Scheideweg?“ reingehört, in dem Axel Wolpert, Egon Fleischer und Björn Beil über ihre Eindrücke zum Thema diskutieren. Tenor: Kunden schreiben immer mehr Funktionen in die Pflichtenhefte, Anbieter versuchen, diesen Anforderungen nachzukommen, aber in der Unternehmenspraxis wird dann nur ein Bruchteil der Möglichkeiten genutzt. Konkret: Content- und Veranstaltungsmanagement. Das eröffnet dann Raum für neue Anbieter, die mit „Basispaketen“ auf den Markt kommen.

Zum Stichwort „Community“ gab es einige interessante Diskussionen. In den Sessions, an denen ich teilgenommen habe, ging es zum Beispiel um Erfolgsrezepte für Communities, denn was im Unternehmens- oder professionellen Kontext oft schwer ins Laufen kommt, funktioniert im Privaten (denken wir nur an Themen wie Gesundheit und Sport) ja sehr erfolgreich. Und selbstverständlich auch im IT-Bereich. In einer Session wurde deshalb auch die „E-Learning Heroes Community“ vorgestellt, in der Articulate ja über 300.000 Mitglieder zusammenführt.Auch die Corporate Learning Community selbst wurde thematisiert. Dabei standen u.a. folgende Fragen im Raum: Wie kann der Austausch zwischen den jährlichen Events bzw. Camps unterstützt werden? Welche Spielarten des Austauschs sind möglich bzw. interessant, z.B. lokal/ überregional, offline/ online? Auf welcher Plattform kann ein netzgestützter Austausch stattfinden?

Der Corporate Learning 2025 MOOCathon war natürlich auch auf dem #clc17 ein Thema, da sowohl die Veranstalter (Corporate Learning Community, zu dessen Kernteam ich ja auch gehöre), einige gastgebende Unternehmen (ich erinnere mich an Viessmann, Audi, Ottobock, Bosch …), aber auch viele MOOC-Teilnehmende in Frankfurt waren.An dieser Stelle sei deshalb auf das Wikibook „Organisationales Lernen im Digitalen Zeitalter“ verwiesen, das ja am 7./ 8. September in einer „konzertierten Aktion“ in Frankfurt entstanden ist und die Stichworte der MOOC-Wochen in eine erste Blaupause überführt. Das Dokument steht übrigens unter einer CC-Lizenz und kann entsprechend heruntergeladen, kopiert, verteilt usw. werden.

Ansonsten habe ich noch einige Erfahrungsberichte gefunden, die weitere Stichpunkte zum #clc17 bieten, zum Beispiel von Joachim Haydecker („Rückblick auf das Corporate Learning Camp 2017“), Simon Dückert („#clc17 Session “Meinen eigenen Podcast aufnehmen”), Daniela Schuchmann („#CLC17 – scil zu Besuch auf dem Corporate Learning Camp 2017 in Frankfurt a.M.“), Lutz Berger („CorporateLearningCamp – CLC17“), Alexander Klier („Corporate Social Learning“), Sirkka Freigang („Wie lernen & arbeiten wir in Zukunft? Ein Rückblick zu #CLC17 & #CHANGEC“), Martina Pumpat  („Stell dir vor, es gibt was zu lernen – und keine/r geht hin.“).

Weitere Stichworte, Anmerkungen und Links sind herzlich willkommen!

Bildquelle: Frank Rumpenhorst