The First Ten Learning Thursday Articles!

Last December, I began publishing Learning Thursday articles every other week. The series covers both learning technology and general training topics. Past articles are listed below.

Please comment if you have topic ideas, and follow me if you’d like to be notified of future posts.

  1. Mobile Technologies in Education
  2. Project-Based Learning
  3. Use Virtual Reality (VR) to Try on Makeup
  4. Is Constructivism an Effective Approach to Instructional Design?
  5. Overcome Your Blended Learning Phobia
  6. Track Classroom Attendance Using a Scan Gun
  7. How Do You Encourage Innovation in Your L&D Team?
  8. Plan a Consistent Training Program
  9. Immersive Learning Experiences in Real Life
  10. The Many Acronyms of Learning Technology

Connect with the author on Twitter or LinkedIn.

The post The First Ten Learning Thursday Articles! appeared first on eLearning.

Making Conferences More Affordable

Affordable Conferences

Pick conferences that are affordable, to begin with. For example, choosing the Adobe eLearning Conference in Washington DC or the Adobe Learning Summit in Vegas are good choices because these conferences are entirely complimentary. In addition to the complimentary registration, Adobe will provide you with a great breakfast and lunch while attending the conference. These are two meals you won’t have to buy that you might have to at other conferences.

Accommodations

The conference is usually at a larger hotel that has conference facilities. These are not usually inexpensive places to stay. Do your research as to where you can stay nearby that will make it more affordable. If you are staying an extra day, try to find a hotel that includes a complimentary breakfast so you can save a few dollars as well. Consider the parking situation if you’re driving. With the price of parking in a downtown hotel, it might be worth leaving your car at the inexpensive hotel and catching an Uber instead. If there are other nearby, consider sharing a ride with them also.

Flights

You don’t have to fly first class to get to your conferences. I fly economy and while I have my prefered airlines, I’m not afraid to look at other carriers to see if I can save some money here and there. Use services like Expedia or Priceline where you can compare rates across many airlines to find the lowest price possible. Also, consider alternative times to fly. Sometimes I’ll choose an earlier or later flight just because it might save me a few bucks, but consider the money you might spend waiting in an airport for a later flight. If you save $30 but have to buy a meal while you wait, it might not be worth it.

Food

Obviously, you will have to buy some meals while you are attending a conference. do some research ahead of time and find out what restaurants are nearby your hotel or the conference facilities. It’s great to try new restaurants and perhaps treat yourself from time to time, but there is nothing wrong with grabbing a sandwich at a sub shop or picking up some cheap eats at a local taco shop. I’ve also picked up a prepackaged sandwich and a bottle of iced tea at a nearby pharmacy. Nothing too terribly wrong with an egg McMuffin either.

Apps & Memberships

Here is one you may not have thought of. There are sometimes apps for the city or the hotel chain that can save you a few dollars. For example, Marriott offers free Wi-Fi to guests who are members of their loyalty program. At what the hotels can sometimes charge for in-room Wi-Fi this can really be worth it. Another App you can get on your phone or tablet that could come in handy for Las Vegas is the myVegas series of apps. This app allows you to play Vegas-style slot machines without spending any real money. You can actually accumulate points that can be traded in for complimentary nights in the hotel and discounts off restaurants and other activities. Please just be careful of the in-app purchases.

Volunteer

And the last thing I want to mention is that you can volunteer yourself to participate in the conference. Prior to the first Adobe eLearning Conference in Washington DC, I reached out and volunteered as a speaker. They accepted my request to help out and have invited me to the live events a total of seven times. As a speaker and frequent participant of the Adobe eLearning Community, they cover many of my expenses to these conferences. I’m not saying that everyone can do this but if you are an influencer in the Adobe eLearning Community, it’s worth looking into and seeing if they want your help for the next conference.

So there are just a few ideas that you can implement to save a few dollars if you’re footing the bill yourself. I’d love to hear other suggestions that you might have. Please put your comments below and perhaps we can keep this thread going for some ideas for Vegas in the fall. Looking forward to seeing all of you in Washington and Vegas.

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New Book – Mastering Adobe Captivate 2019

Jan 31st 2019 will remain as a day to remember for both myself and Pooja Jaisingh as it is the day our second book has been published by Packt Publishing.

You can grab your copy (eBook or print copy) from

Mastering Adobe Captivate 2019 Cover“Mastering Adobe Captivate 2019” is the fifth edition of the “Mastering Adobe Captivate ” series and the second that Pooja and I co-author.  Once again, we have been privileged to work alongside some of the greatest experts of this very community.

  • Special thanks to our friend Kirsten Rourke for being such an thorough reviewer.
  • Thanks to the 15 members of the Captivate community that have accepted to be featured at the end of each chapter
  • Thanks to Allen_Partridge for authoring such a nice foreword

The community has always been at the heart of the “Mastering Adobe Captivate” series, and this fifth edition makes no exception!

In this last edition, we have included the latest features of Adobe Captivate 2019. There is for example an entire chapter on Virtual Reality projects as well as a new section about Interactive Videos in the chapter on Interactivity. The chapter on Responsive Project has been upgraded to include the latest enhancements of the Fuild Box 2.0 of Adobe Captivate 2019.

We have also removed a few sections about legacy objects that are not supported in Flash. Since the Flash player will cease to be supported next year, we thought it was time to remove these objects from the book. For example, we have removed the sections on Text Animation, Rollover Captions, Rollover Images, etc.. We have also updated the exercise files accordingly.

By popular demand, we have added in the Variables and Advanced Actions chapter, a more advanced section on using JavaScript in Adobe Captivate.

So after 5 month of hard work, we are very proud to have come up with the most comprehensive book ever on Adobe Captivate.

Who this book is for?

  • If you are a Captivate newbie, this book will teach you the features of Adobe Captivate in a friendly step-by-step manner.
  • If you are a Captivate expert, you can use this book as a reference book. The chapters are designed to be self-contained, so you can skip the chapters you already know about and read the book in any order you want!
  • If you are a Captivate Instructor, you can use this book as your courseware. The chapters propose a logical step-by-step approach and you can download the sample files to teach a flawless and comprehensive Captivate class to your students!

What is the content of the book?

The book is divided in the following 15 chapters

  1. Getting Started with Adobe Captivate 2019
  2. Working with Standard Objects
  3. Working with Multimedia
  4. Working with the Timeline and Other Useful Tools
  5. Developing Interactivity
  6. Crafting the Graphical Experience with Styles and Themes
  7. Working with Quizzes
  8. Capturing Onscreen Action
  9. Producing a Video Demo
  10. Creating a Responsive Project
  11. Creating Virtual Reality Projects
  12. Using Captivate with Other Applications
  13. Creating Accessible eLearning
  14. Variables and Advanced Actions
  15. Finishing Touches and Publishing

How can you grab your copy?

You can get the book online from various channels including

The book is available in various formats including eBook (PDF, Mobi, ePub, Amazon Kindle, etc.) and print copy.

How can you help?

Your help and feedback is always welcome and appreciated

  • If you have read the book, don’t hesitate to drop us a line about what you liked / disliked. This will help us come up with the next edition.
  • Your review on Amazon is also very much appreciated
  • and don’t hesitate to contact us should you have any question about the book!

All in all, we are very proud of this achievement. We are confident that this new book will help people Master Adobe Captivate and build incredible eLearning modules with one of the best authoring tools around!

The post New Book – Mastering Adobe Captivate 2019 appeared first on eLearning.

What’s new and changed in the latest Community Portal update

Notifications

This update addresses changes in the notification workflow. You will get an email notification for the following scenarios:

  • When your post is published. Users who follow you will also get an email notification.
  • When a new comment is approved. Users who’ve already commented on the post will also get an email notification.
  • When someone mentions you in a post or a comment.
  • When you re-edit a previously posted comment. Users who’ve commented on the post will also get an email notification.
  • When someone follows you.
  • When your level is upgraded or downgraded.

To activate the notification service, follow the steps below:

  1. On the top right-hand corner of the page, click User Profile.

2. Click Settings.

3. On the Mail Notifications page, enable or disable an appropriate notification workflow.

Search

This update also enhances the search performance in the portal. We’ve integrated a few changes in the background to make the search experience as seamless as possible.

The post What’s new and changed in the latest Community Portal update appeared first on eLearning.

Learning Thursday #2: Project-Based Learning

Earlier this month, I started the Learning Thursday blog series, which features a new learning and development article every other week that has a unique perspective.  I’ll also post some discussion points for those who would like to reflect on the article.  If you’d like to participate, please follow me here on the Adobe eLearning blog and comment on this week’s article:

Krajcik, J., & Blumenfeld, P. (2006). Project-based learning. In R. K. Sawyer (Ed.), Cambridge handbook of the learning sciences (pp. 317–334). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. Google Scholar

(The Google Scholar link will take you to a free PDF of the article.)

Introductory Paragraph: Any teacher or parent can tell you that many students are bored in school. But many of them tend to assume that boredom is not a problem with the best students, and that if students tried harder or learned better they wouldn’t be bored. In the 1980s and 1990s, education researchers increasingly realized that when students are bored and unengaged, they are less likely to learn (Blumenfeld et al., 1991). Studies of student experience found that almost all students are bored in school, even the ones who score well on standardized tests (Csikszentmihalyi, Rathunde, & Whalen, 1993). By about 1990, it became obvious to education researchers that the problem wasn’t the fault of the students; there was something wrong with the structure of schooling. If we could find a way to engage students in their learning, to restructure the classroom so that students would be motivated to learn, that would be a dramatic change.

After reading the article, please add a comment with your thoughts on one (or all) of these questions:

  1. Can you give an example of a project-based learning experience you’ve had?
  2. What is one topic you would like to deliver using a project-based learning approach?
  3. How can learning technology be used to support project-based learning?

The post Learning Thursday #2: Project-Based Learning appeared first on eLearning.

Learning Thursday #1: Mobile Technologies in Education

We’re almost to the new year, so I figure I’ll start a new blog post series.    I’m going to put out a new learning and development article every other week that has a unique perspective.  I’ll also post some discussion points for those who would like to reflect on the article.  If you’d like to participate, please follow me here on the Adobe eLearning blog and comment on our first article:

Vavoula, G., Sharples, M., Lonsdale, P., Rudman, P., & Meek, J. (2007). Learning bridges: Mobile technologies in education. Educational Technology, 47(3), 33–37. Google Scholar

(The Google Scholar link will take you to JSTOR, where you can read this article for free.)

Abstract: MyArtSpace is a service for children to spread their learning between schools and museums using mobile phones linked to a personal Web space. Using MyArtSpace as an example, the authors discuss the possibilities for mobile technology to form bridges between formal and informal learning. They also offer guidelines for designing such bridges.

Please add a comment with your thoughts on one (or both) of these questions:

  1. Have you seen a learning experience in the corporate world that is similar to the MyArtSpace experience discussed in the article?
  2. Can you think of an environment other than a museum where this sort of learning experience would be effective?

The post Learning Thursday #1: Mobile Technologies in Education appeared first on eLearning.

Negotiate Your Learning Management System (LMS) Contract

Congratulations, you’ve gone through the process of selecting the perfect learning management system vendor for your learning and development organization! All that stands between you and that beautiful piece of learning technology is the vendor contract, and the associated price tag.

During one of my conference sessions last year, I was asked whether it’s possible to negotiate the price of an LMS. And the answer is – absolutely you can! Buying technology is somewhat similar to buying a car. It’s a big investment, and you can negotiate many elements of the contract with your vendor, particularly the cost.

As the video states, it’s important to know exactly what you are paying for. If the vendor gives you a “lump sum” for your three-year contract, have them break it out so you see the line items that contribute to the overall cost. You may be able to strike features and services you don’t need, or negotiate a lower cost for some of the line items. Also discuss payment schedules. Can you get a lower overall price if you pay more up front, for example?

Most importantly, don’t be afraid to ask questions and propose changes to the contract! It’s a critical part of your LMS selection process, and your learning technology vendor should be willing to collaborate with you. Contract negotiation is the exciting last step of your LMS selection process, and it signals the beginning of your LMS implementation!

Information in this video and post is taken from my book LMS Success.  Please subscribe to Learn Tech Collective for more LMS and e-learning videos.  Follow me on Twitter or connect on LinkedIn.

The post Negotiate Your Learning Management System (LMS) Contract appeared first on eLearning.

Trends in Training & Learning Management (Includes Webinar Recording & Slides)

On November 21, I facilitated a discussion of major trends in learning and development.  Fun and data was had by all, thanks to our awesome audience from around the world!

If you would like to check out the full session recording, click here.  The description is below.  And here are the slides:

Join Adobe’s Senior Learning Evangelist Katrina Marie Baker for this lively conversation about the latest trends in training & development. Based on recent studies and research, the session will explore what people are doing in organizations around the world, and how organizations can achieve great results with modern learning programs.

Katrina will discuss the:

  • Impetus behind creating and developing virtual universities
  • Growing demand to encourage learner immersion and ongoing engagement
  • Rise of mobile learning
  • Role of skill-based learning in business training
  • Use of gamification for learner engagement and motivation
  • Ongoing expectations of learners for video
  • Proving the value of your learning program through more relevant reporting

The post Trends in Training & Learning Management (Includes Webinar Recording & Slides) appeared first on eLearning.

Task List for Your Learning Management System (LMS) Implementation

***If you’d like to attend a free webinar on how to implement your LMS, join me tomorrow!***

Quite a few of us hear the words “learning management system implementation” and run for the hills. It’s natural to be afraid of taking on a project that is totally outside of your normal, everyday function. No need to worry – implementing an LMS is absolutely something you can do.

The most critical part of any LMS implementation is your project plan. Make sure you have a basic understanding of LMS administration. Break your implementation into individual tasks, and assign timelines and responsible parties. Work closely with your LMS vendor. They often provide a partial timeline you can use as a starting point. (In the case of Adobe Captivate Prime, you work through tasks with an LMS customer success manager.)

Down below, I’ve provided a list of implementation tasks from my book, LMS Success. Depending on the organization, some of these tasks will be very important, and others won’t apply. Pull the appropriate tasks into Excel or Project, assign start and end dates for each task, and determine who will be responsible for its completion.  (Those who purchase LMS Success or The LMS Selection Checklist get a bundle of supplementary resources, including an Excel workbook of implementation tasks.)

You may want to further divide some tasks into smaller pieces, or create workflows. It depends on the project size and how complex your implementation will be. You can also group tasks by dividing your implementation into five phases, like this:

1: Before vendor is selected  |  2: After vendor is selected  |  3: During contract negotiations  |  4: Before go-live  |  5: After go-live

The task list below is a starting point – not a prescribed plan.  I’ve led or consulted on 30+ implementations, and I change the task list every time.  Also note that some tasks do not directly pertain to the LMS. Many organizations take their LMS implementation as an opportunity to restructure their training department, so you’ll see some of those elements as well.

© Katrina Marie Baker, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from the author is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be used, provided that full credit is given to Katrina Marie Baker with specific direction to LMS Success.

In order to assign compliance and other critical courses in the new LMS…

  1. Create a list of compliance courses required of all personnel.
  2. Create a list of compliance courses required for specific regions or countries.
  3. Create a list of compliance courses required for specific personnel.
  4. For all compliance courses – is completion required one time or on a recurring basis?
  5. Standardize classes provided to new hires.
  6. Create a list reflecting courses, personnel to receive them, and whether courses should be automatically assigned based on a set of rules (assuming your LMS does this).
  7. Do you want a standard group of courses to be pushed to personnel on their hire date? Or three months after they’ve joined? Or every year during their employment?
  8. Should compliance courses be maintained in paper formats as an alternative, in case of a system failure?

To assemble your course catalog…

  1. Are there any courses in your current LMS that should not be transferred to the new LMS?
  2. Determine names for all course categories and subcategories.
  3. Compare existing courses and determine which are similar enough to be merged when you migrate to the new LMS. (Many organizations have courses that have been added multiple times to their LMS. Might as well clean that up.)
  4. Mark corporate events and other non-training courses in the course catalog spreadsheet so they can be categorized appropriately and/or eliminated. (A lot of organizations use their LMS as an event management system. This can really clutter your course catalog.)
  5. Correct categories, subcategories, delivery, and course unit types for all courses, on a spreadsheet.
  6. Determine course catalog import structure. (Ask your new LMS vendor about this.)
  7. Should courses in all languages be displayed in the same catalog? In multiple catalogs?
  8. Assign college levels (100 level, 200 level, and so on) so curricula are assigned in an appropriate order.

Some general administrative tasks (in addition to those provided by your LMS vendor)…

  1. Decide how many administrator levels are needed, with associated permissions. (Questions about how to do this or any other tasks? Just comment below.)
  2. Create a list of tasks each level of administrator will complete.
  3. Decide on lead administrators for each department, if your organization is large.
  4. Determine a “regular chores” list for administrators.
  5. Create an LMS support email address that routes to the correct admins.
  6. Will IT have any administrator role in the new LMS?
  7. Determine what inbound/outbound system feeds need to run to the LMS. Maybe your HRIS?
  8. Decide on a go-live date for the LMS.
  9. Discuss GDPR and ADA 508 compliance.
  10. Run test batch import of all data types, such as course history, user information, and so on. (Ask your LMS vendor for advice.)
  11. After running successful test batches, import all data. Test to confirm success.
  12. Discuss whether interface should be offered in multiple languages.
  13. Create course equivalencies.
  14. Exploration of the benefits of xAPI, and how it can be effectively introduced.
  15. Get administrator tip sheets from vendor, if possible.
  16. Discuss how to utilize assessments and surveys more effectively.
  17. Schedule super administrator training with new LMS vendor.
  18. Explore security features and any national or international regulations pertaining to the data in your LMS.
  19. Negotiate contract.
  20. Negotiate SLA.
  21. Decide when to cut over from your old LMS to the new LMS.
  22. Communicate that cut-over plan to your end users.
  23. Decide on the URL for the new LMS.
  24. Replace links to the old LMS with links to the new one.
  25. Train administrators on new system processes.
  26. Begin weekly recorded webinars on LMS administration targeted for different admin levels.
  27. Begin bi-weekly LMS “office hours,” to assist your LMS administrators with data entry and basic questions.
  28. Develop how-to videos for common LMS user/administrator tasks.
  29. Evaluate your organization’s training data entry procedure and streamline it. (Make sure your trainers track their classroom sessions and attendees in the LMS.)
  30. Test user interface prior to go-live. (Have lots of people test it. Try to break it.)
  31. Test class scheduling functionality.
  32. Test learning tracks or paths, and reports.
  33. Test upload of courses.
  34. Test EVERYTHING.
  35. Allow extra time to troubleshoot.
  36. Run a test of the system backup, if there is one.
  37. Run a test upgrade.
  38. System FAQ documents for members of your IT department as well as end users. (Definitely explain how to reset a user password, if passwords are required!)
  39. Review current third-party course vendors. Are they cost-effective?

Marketing and design tasks…

  1. Determine a name for the new LMS.
  2. Create an LMS logo.
  3. Determine a multi-tier marketing plan for different employee levels.
  4. Draft the look of the user interface.
  5. Add gamification elements, if needed.
  6. Create an LMS introductory video, emails, or posters to help you internally market the system.

What tasks would you add to this list?  Comment below!  Connect with me on Twitter or LinkedIn.

© Katrina Marie Baker, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from the author is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be used, provided that full credit is given to Katrina Baker with specific direction to LMS Success.

The post Task List for Your Learning Management System (LMS) Implementation appeared first on eLearning.

Task List for Your Learning Management System (LMS) Implementation

***If you’d like to attend a free webinar on how to implement your LMS, join me tomorrow!***

Quite a few of us hear the words “learning management system implementation” and run for the hills. It’s natural to be afraid of taking on a project that is totally outside of your normal, everyday function. No need to worry – implementing an LMS is absolutely something you can do.

The most critical part of any LMS implementation is your project plan. Make sure you have a basic understanding of LMS administration. Break your implementation into individual tasks, and assign timelines and responsible parties. Work closely with your LMS vendor. They often provide a partial timeline you can use as a starting point. (In the case of Adobe Captivate Prime, you work through tasks with an LMS customer success manager.)

Down below, I’ve provided a list of implementation tasks from my book, LMS Success. Depending on the organization, some of these tasks will be very important, and others won’t apply. Pull the appropriate tasks into Excel or Project, assign start and end dates for each task, and determine who will be responsible for its completion.  (Those who purchase LMS Success or The LMS Selection Checklist get a bundle of supplementary resources, including an Excel workbook of implementation tasks.)

You may want to further divide some tasks into smaller pieces, or create workflows. It depends on the project size and how complex your implementation will be. You can also group tasks by dividing your implementation into five phases, like this:

1: Before vendor is selected  |  2: After vendor is selected  |  3: During contract negotiations  |  4: Before go-live  |  5: After go-live

The task list below is a starting point – not a prescribed plan.  I’ve led or consulted on 30+ implementations, and I change the task list every time.  Also note that some tasks do not directly pertain to the LMS. Many organizations take their LMS implementation as an opportunity to restructure their training department, so you’ll see some of those elements as well.

© Katrina Marie Baker, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from the author is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be used, provided that full credit is given to Katrina Marie Baker with specific direction to LMS Success.

In order to assign compliance and other critical courses in the new LMS…

  1. Create a list of compliance courses required of all personnel.
  2. Create a list of compliance courses required for specific regions or countries.
  3. Create a list of compliance courses required for specific personnel.
  4. For all compliance courses – is completion required one time or on a recurring basis?
  5. Standardize classes provided to new hires.
  6. Create a list reflecting courses, personnel to receive them, and whether courses should be automatically assigned based on a set of rules (assuming your LMS does this).
  7. Do you want a standard group of courses to be pushed to personnel on their hire date? Or three months after they’ve joined? Or every year during their employment?
  8. Should compliance courses be maintained in paper formats as an alternative, in case of a system failure?

To assemble your course catalog…

  1. Are there any courses in your current LMS that should not be transferred to the new LMS?
  2. Determine names for all course categories and subcategories.
  3. Compare existing courses and determine which are similar enough to be merged when you migrate to the new LMS. (Many organizations have courses that have been added multiple times to their LMS. Might as well clean that up.)
  4. Mark corporate events and other non-training courses in the course catalog spreadsheet so they can be categorized appropriately and/or eliminated. (A lot of organizations use their LMS as an event management system. This can really clutter your course catalog.)
  5. Correct categories, subcategories, delivery, and course unit types for all courses, on a spreadsheet.
  6. Determine course catalog import structure. (Ask your new LMS vendor about this.)
  7. Should courses in all languages be displayed in the same catalog? In multiple catalogs?
  8. Assign college levels (100 level, 200 level, and so on) so curricula are assigned in an appropriate order.

Some general administrative tasks (in addition to those provided by your LMS vendor)…

  1. Decide how many administrator levels are needed, with associated permissions. (Questions about how to do this or any other tasks? Just comment below.)
  2. Create a list of tasks each level of administrator will complete.
  3. Decide on lead administrators for each department, if your organization is large.
  4. Determine a “regular chores” list for administrators.
  5. Create an LMS support email address that routes to the correct admins.
  6. Will IT have any administrator role in the new LMS?
  7. Determine what inbound/outbound system feeds need to run to the LMS. Maybe your HRIS?
  8. Decide on a go-live date for the LMS.
  9. Discuss GDPR and ADA 508 compliance.
  10. Run test batch import of all data types, such as course history, user information, and so on. (Ask your LMS vendor for advice.)
  11. After running successful test batches, import all data. Test to confirm success.
  12. Discuss whether interface should be offered in multiple languages.
  13. Create course equivalencies.
  14. Exploration of the benefits of xAPI, and how it can be effectively introduced.
  15. Get administrator tip sheets from vendor, if possible.
  16. Discuss how to utilize assessments and surveys more effectively.
  17. Schedule super administrator training with new LMS vendor.
  18. Explore security features and any national or international regulations pertaining to the data in your LMS.
  19. Negotiate contract.
  20. Negotiate SLA.
  21. Decide when to cut over from your old LMS to the new LMS.
  22. Communicate that cut-over plan to your end users.
  23. Decide on the URL for the new LMS.
  24. Replace links to the old LMS with links to the new one.
  25. Train administrators on new system processes.
  26. Begin weekly recorded webinars on LMS administration targeted for different admin levels.
  27. Begin bi-weekly LMS “office hours,” to assist your LMS administrators with data entry and basic questions.
  28. Develop how-to videos for common LMS user/administrator tasks.
  29. Evaluate your organization’s training data entry procedure and streamline it. (Make sure your trainers track their classroom sessions and attendees in the LMS.)
  30. Test user interface prior to go-live. (Have lots of people test it. Try to break it.)
  31. Test class scheduling functionality.
  32. Test learning tracks or paths, and reports.
  33. Test upload of courses.
  34. Test EVERYTHING.
  35. Allow extra time to troubleshoot.
  36. Run a test of the system backup, if there is one.
  37. Run a test upgrade.
  38. System FAQ documents for members of your IT department as well as end users. (Definitely explain how to reset a user password, if passwords are required!)
  39. Review current third-party course vendors. Are they cost-effective?

Marketing and design tasks…

  1. Determine a name for the new LMS.
  2. Create an LMS logo.
  3. Determine a multi-tier marketing plan for different employee levels.
  4. Draft the look of the user interface.
  5. Add gamification elements, if needed.
  6. Create an LMS introductory video, emails, or posters to help you internally market the system.

What tasks would you add to this list?  Comment below!  Connect with me on Twitter or LinkedIn.

© Katrina Marie Baker, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from the author is strictly prohibited. Excerpts may be used, provided that full credit is given to Katrina Baker with specific direction to LMS Success.

The post Task List for Your Learning Management System (LMS) Implementation appeared first on eLearning.