Hotspots for a 2D Image – workflow 2 (close button/lightbox)

Intro

A week ago I published a first showcase, explaining how to replicate the hotspot workflow for VR projects on a 2D image. This second article about using hotspots for a 2D image is not duplicating as closely that same feature: instead of showing the popups for a duration defined by the developer, this workflow will offer a close button for the popups. The learner decides when to close a popup and proceed (eventually) to the next hotspot. I also used a technique, often labeled as ‘lightbox’: to have the popup stand out of the rest of the content, it will have a semi-transparent cover in the background dimming the rest of the slide.

Example movie

I used the same image (welcome screen) and content for the popups as i the first workflow. Only  some small color changes and changes in the location have been applied . Watch this 3-slide movie: after the title slide (doubles as poster image) you can test the new hotspot slide, and the last slide gives a short Step-by-step list if you want to use this slide in your project.

Play

Try it out: quick workflow

You can download the project file from this LINK.

If you do not need to have more than 6 hotspots, and you are happy with the resolution of the project (1024×627) and its Theme (Pink Icing), you can quickly use the hotspot slide using these steps:

  1. Create a blank project, with that resolution and theme. Create your title slide, and eventually a poster image as explained in his older article
  2. Copy the hotspot slide from the sample project and paste it into your project. The object names will get an extra number, but you don’t have to bother about that. The advanced and shared action is automatically adapting to the new names.
  3. Select the Image..  ‘WelcomeScreen.png’ and replace it by your image (Properties panel).
  4. Move eventually the hotspots to the right location. If you need less than 6 hotspots you can hide some of them in output. Deleting is also possible. Start by hiding or deleting the last hotspot(s). The sequence of the hotspots is starting with HS_Responsive (first in first row), going to the right and then to the second row. Last hotspot is for the PPT.
  5. Open the multistate object SS_Info.. which is just on top of the ‘Cover’ (needs to be there). Click the State view button in the Properties panel to open the Object State panel.
  6. Leave the Normal state alone. Replace the content in the other states by your content (follow the sequence described under 4.)  You don’t need to rename the states, nor to delete the last unused ones (just leave them as they are).
  7. Start testing with ‘Preview HTML in Browser’ (F11).

More?

Of course it is possible to have more control over the design, to add hotspots if more than 6 are needed. Let me know if you want to try this out from scratch, taking advantage of the shared action which you can reuse in any project. I could write out the complete step-by-step workflow if you find it useful.

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Importance of Captivate’s Events?

Intro

Over 6 years ago I published a blog post explaining the importance of Events in the application. I also offered for free a table describing all the possible events. Meanwhile new features have been added, the User interface has changes. It is time to update that old post and table. You will be able to download the table at the end. It is a protected document, you can print it at a low resolution, but no permission for editing. You can find workarounds, but please I beg you to show some respect for my work.

When training/helping users to start with advanced or shared actions, I often detect that newbies are not aware of the process needed to trigger an (advanced/shared) action: each action, whether a simple, shared  or advanced has to be linked to an ‘Event’, and that is the subject of this article.

Events – out of the box

Lot of events to trigger an action are linked with interactivity, requiring  the user to act.  That  is the case for Success/Last Attempt  events for (Shape) Buttons, Click Boxes, Text Entry boxes, interactive Learning interactions, Drag&Drop but also for Question/Knowledge Check slides.

Less known are the actions that can be triggered when a Quiz is completed (Passed/Failed).

In that older blog post I mentioned the  Rollover slidelet which had  two events: on Rollover, and on Click. Since that object is no longer supported for HTML5 output, I took it out of the table.

Object actions can be triggered by each drag event in a Drag&Drop slide and offer a lot of possibilities. Have a look at all the posts I published about Drag&Drop.

Ignored by most users are the Hyperlink events. Such an event is not limited to ‘hyperlink’, but can trigger all sorts of actions, including Advanced actions. Find a example here.

Events that are not linked with interactivity are the slide events: when entering or when exiting a slide, you can have a simple, advanced or shared action to be executed. Have a look at the table to see possible limitations.

Often I get the question if an action can be triggered by time or by a frame. Not possible out of the box, but with micro-navigation, eventually the Delay Next actions command and/or the Timer/Hourglass interaction this limitation can be overridden.

Overlay slides in Interactive Video, both the content and KC slides have similare events to those in a normal project. However the events for the hotspots in a VR project or 360 image/video are more limited as are the overlay Quiz slides in a VR project.

Widget to extend events

InfoSemantics developed a HTML5 widget that is one of my favourites: the CpExtra Widget. Adding events to objects is only one of its multiple features. It is not free but if you are plunging really into advanced/shared  actions, please try it out because it can add as many events as you want to any object. A trial version is available.

InfoSemantics used to have a SWF widget (EventHandler), worked great, but with the EOL of Flash player for all browsers, not so useful anymore.

List

You can download the list from this link.

There are two  tables. First table shows events able to  trigger only one simple, shared or advanced action/ The second smaller table summarizes the events which can trigger one out of two possible actions based on a condition: validated TEB, question slides, scored Drag&Drop slides  and Quiz.

I would appreciate if you left some comment in case you find this list useful. If you find this list useful, I could offer some other tables as well.

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Issue with Shared Actions (not disappearing when advancing/requires two clicks)

Hi everyone! First time poster here. I’m creating a curriculum for a client that wanted it created with Captivate. It’s a fish ID course, so each slide is a fish image. There’s a question mark at the bottom that, when clicked, opens the fish name. I made it a shared action so that when the user advances to the next slide, it is supposed to disappear.

It worked fine for one export, but now the actions apparently no longer work. Additionally, it requires two clicks to trigger the pop-up. I got these buttons working over two months ago at this point, and since it was my first time working with advanced actions, I can’t remember for the life of me what I did.  In the one screenshot of the Advanced Actions box, you’ll see that one setting is left blank. I don’t remember why that’s like that but it’s the same in the archived version of the project where the actions work correctly.

If anyone can advise, I’m happy to share a link to the project. It’s a massive file; every slide is an image so it’s 776.2 MB (even when saved as 150 dpi at 1280 x 720). I’ve included some screenshots that might be relevant. Looking forward to some answers!

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Custom Effects in Advanced/Shared Actions

Intro

Almost 8 years ago I posted this article on my personal blog: Editing Motion Paths and Using Custom Effects. 

Since that time Effects have been improved a lot, advanced and shared actions can make life much easier. Time to upgrade that blog post, meanwhile testing the behavior of effects in HTML output in CP2019. While Flash was always to be trusted, that is not the case for HTML output. And indeed, I bumped onto a problem with the Scale effect, and sometimes the Rotate to effect. When those problems are solved, I will post a published movie. The workflow to use Custom effects in a shared or advanced action is however still the same since many versions. It is a bit complicated, I have answered many questions about it in the forums. I will write it out now step by step.

When do you need  a custom effect?

Effects have been improved in some ways. Some parameters can be defined in the Advanced Actions dialog box. Look for the start time of an effect, its duration and more numeric fields (alpha, rotation, ease in/out, alpha….). However when using a combination of effects over and over again, you can create one custom effect which saves that combination and can applied in one step including the sequence and duration of the different effects. Another practical example are the motion effects, where you need to edit the motion path, which is certainly the case for more complicated custom motion paths.  This screenshot shows an example of a complicated combination of effects on the Timeline. It was meant to be applied to simulate a swimming fish:

Step by Step

Step 1:  Create and save effect

Create the effect or combination of effects on any object as a ‘Self)time based animation and test it out thoroughly (Preview HTML in Browser for a non-responsive project) in several browsers before saving it with a custom name.

You don’t need to save it in a specific folder. I use to save it with the project I am working on as is the case in the screenshot above. Effects are stored in XML-files.

Step 2: Apply the custom effect as time-based animation

If you would try to use the saved effect in a shared/advanced action it will no be available. If this is the first custom effect you ever created, there will not even be a Custom category to choose from You need first to delete all the individual effects applied to the object (above it was to the object SV_Fish (a SVG image). Then apply the custom effect as a (Self) time based animation again, but now with ‘one’ effect chosen with the browse button.

When looking at the timeline you’ll see exactly the same result as in the screenshot at the beginning: all the effects in the correct sequence and with the duration you had chosen.

The result of this second application is that the Category ‘Custom’ will now have been created, and it will have the new custom effect ‘Swimming’.

Step “: use in advanced or shared action

If you only wanted to apply this action using an interactive object, you could use a simple action. The field Category will now have the Custom category.

However often effects are used in Advanced or Shared actions in combination with other commands. In this example the Fishes are originally hidden, so I need to Show them and apply the effectn eventually also have an audio clip playing separately.

The two buttons on this example will trigger the same shared action. Both fishes are hidden in output at the start. When creating the advanced action, the category Custom can now be used, and the available parameters (start, duration) could be edited, but mostly you’ll not want to do that.

Because I needed to use this action twice, maybe also later in other projects unchanged or as template for other actions, I preferred a shared action which will have only one parameter: the object itself. An effect cannot be a parameter. However, the effect can not only be applied to one object, but also to a group. I can replace one fish by a group of fishes.

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What is Branch Aware?

Intro

Branch aware feature appeared with Captivate 6.  I created a blog post to explain it, but I regularly meet users who are still unaware of its existence, or its possibilities. So I decided to refurbish that old post, and create a new example movie with CP2019. You have seen a first version of that movie in my recent post about localisation with CSV import. That post discusses the workflow to create quiz slides in different languages in the same project. The example did use the Branch aware feature, but some of the features were not fully localised: the score slide was the default score slide which is in English since I am using a version in that tongue.

In this post I will also talk a lot about the quizzing system variables. If you didn’t download my explanatory table yet, please do so. You’ll find a link in this blog post: Creative with Quizzing variables.

What is Branch Aware?

Look at the Advanced Interaction panel of the example movie. It gives you a lot of information, not only about the events and the triggered actions, but also about all scored objects, including question slides.

You see that the total score is set at 60 points, result of the 9 graded questions in the file. For each of those graded slides both the individual score and the penalty are shown. There are also 3 Survey slides, without a score. Those values are also stored in quizzing system variables:

  • Total score in cpQuizInfoTotalQuizPoints
  • Score per question in cpQuizInfoPointsPerQuestionSlide (reusable variable)
  • Penalty per question in cpQuizInfoNegativePointsOnCurrentQuestionSlide (reusable variable)

If you don’t activate the option ‘Branch Aware in Quiz Preferencesn Settings (see screenshot later on), the default score slide will show 60 as maximum score. If the learner takes only one branch (language) of the quiz, the percentage (cpInfoPercentage) will be calculated as the obtained score (cpQuizInfoPointsscored) divided by that maximum score of 60. Same with the number of correct answers and total number of answers. This means the learner would be very confused, and never succeeds in that case. Reason is that those system variables are fixed when the course starts, I label them as being ‘static’.

When turning on Branch Aware, the system variables become ‘dynamic’, they will be changed on runtime based on the branch, thse slides visited by the learner. In this example movie that has been my choice: if the learner succeeds in one branch (maybe Dutch) the maximum possible score will be changed to 20, the percentage will be calculated with that maximum and the obtained score and the learner will see correct data on the score slide, can reach the passing score. No problem if a trilingual learner did visit the three branches, since the variables are dynamic, he will be judged on the maximum score of 60. This is the setup of Quiz Preferences, Setting for the example movie:

Example Movie

Play

Setup Project

The project has 16 slides: Title slide, Dashboard slide, 3 groups each with 4 questions, the default score slide and a custom score slide. This is the Filmstrip, I expanded the group ‘Dutch questions’:

Dashboard slide (slide 2)

I will not explain the effects on the dashboard slide, where I used a loop action (While) triggered by the On Enter event.

I created a user variable v_all The four buttons on this slide trigger a shared action which has two parameters: which value has to be assigned to the variable (1=All, E=English, D=Dutch, F=French) and the slide to jump to. Here is the instance for the button ‘Nederlands’ (Dutch):

Start slide of question groups Dutch/French

On all quiz slides a shape is displayed with info about the obtained score and correct answers so far. That shape, labeled SS_Info is a multistate object. In the Normal state the English version is displayed, there are two more states:  Dutch and French. Switching to the appropriate state is done with the On Enter event of the start slide of the Dutch and the French group. It is a simple action:

Because the project is pure linear, and there is no opportunity to go back, this setup is sufficient.

Last slide of each group (Survey slide)

The event ‘After Survey’ is used to navigate to the appropriate score slide. For the learners who did take the three branches, the default score slide (ScoreDefault = slide 15) is used, for the others the custom score slide 16. The same advanced action ‘LastAct’ can be used for the last slide in each group. If that last slide was a normal quiz slide, not a Survey slide, the same action could be used but for both Success and Last Attempt events.

Custom Score slide (16)

On this slide I used several multistate objects: where I added two states (Dutch/French) to the Normal state which has the English text. The On Enter event of this slide is used to trigger this action which will take care of showing the correct language information, and of the appearance of the Tropy image if the learner has passed.

One warning: the maximum score on the custom score slide is not created by using a system variable, but typed in (can also be calculated, as I explained in an older post about intermediate score slides). The variable cpQuizInfoTotalQuizPoints will not have changed from the original 60 points which took into account all quiz slides. It is strange because cpInfoPercentage where that maximum score is used, is correctly displayed as is  cpQuizInfoPointsscored.

Conclusion

I know that more improvements are possible, but blog post is already pretty long. If you really want to show a custom progress indicator on the quiz slides, maybe you’ll find some inspiration in this old post. 

If you allow backwards navigation, even give the opportunity to choose another branch on the dashboard, there will be some more editing needed. This article was meant to explain what happens when using the Branch Aware feature. Hope it helps some people.

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Would like to meet you on 2-4 October in Las Vegas

Why?

The Adobe team has invited me to the Adobe Learning Summit (3-4 October) based on my 10 years of answering questions in forums and other social media (I don’t like titles like ‘Legend’ or ‘Top most contributor/expert’).  They insist on having me meet users, being able for once to do in person what I do daily throughout virtual channels with Captivate users worldwide: help for solving small and big issues you are bumping on, offering practical tips, explaining and clarifying workflows.  It is always a pleasure to meet users in person!

Welcome to everyone. It is possible you don’t know me, in that case have a look at the blogs I posted on this portal, and at my personal blog: http://blog.lilybiri.com.  You will see that I have some favourite topics:

  • Shared and Advanced actions: since they appeared with Captivate 4 I have explored them in depth, helped many developers solving use cases (also as consultant and trainer). A fan recently indicated me as ‘True empress of Advanced and Shared Actions’, a promotion over the title ‘Queen of Advanced Actions’ which I got long time ago.
    Example: Shared Actions
  • Stumbling Blocks:  most users struggle with the Timeline,  which is the most important panel in Captivate. The sequence of articles and movies I published about the timeline, and their popularity proves my statement. Second main problem is understanding the design of the Quiz in Captivate: how is it set up, which tweaks are possible. Third problem, linked with design, is setting up a custom Theme. This can save so many hours while developing, and its power is often misunderstood.
    Example: Pausing Captivate’s Timeline
  • Workarounds: Captivate is to me the most flexible and multifeatured eLearning authoring tool. Because of that multitude of features, not every feature has all the functionality some users wish to have. Explore my blog posts, for many of those lacking functionality I have posted a workaround.
    Example: Navigation button for InteractiveVideo

When/Where?

I will be available in the hotel of the conference (Hard Rock) on 2 October (afternoon), 3 and 4 October.  If you want to meet, send me a note using any channel you want: Twitter (@Lilybiri), comment on this article, mail at info@lilybiri.com,  If I am able to have a US phone number, will post it here as well.  Or you may just hail me when you see me walking around (will assist in all classes for the certificate on 3 October).

Looking forward to meeting!

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Short answer question or Scrolling Text for Survey?

Intro

Once in a while a question like in this thread pops up:

“….students will need to answer short answer questions.  They will not be right or wrong, they will be their thoughts.  Is there a way to have all their answers compile into a final screen at the end?”

It seems logical to use short answer quiz slides, in Survey mode, for this use case. However I prefer to use one of the Learning Interactions, ‘Scolling Text’ for reasons I want to explain in this article, by describing both workflows with their specificities. It is up to you to decide which you’ll use. In both workflows variables will be important, hope you are familiar with them.

Short Answer quiz slides, Survey mode

Setup quiz slides

No right/wrong answer means that scoring has no sense, change the stqtus of the quiz slide to ‘Survey’. Nevertheless a score slide will be inserted but you can hide it easily.

Answers to quiz slides are stored in a reusable variable, cpQuizInfoAnswerChoice. After a short answer question the variable will contain the text typed in by the learner in the short answer field. Reusable means that the value will change after each short answer slide. Since we need to store each answer safely (for reusing on the slide at the end), you will need:

  • to create a user variable for each short answer question; I will label them v_First, v_Second, v_Third for the example you’ll see in the demo movie;
  • the default answer area is pretty small (one line), if you expect longer answers, make sure to increase the height of the answer area. It is not possible to edit the used master slide because it applies to multiple types of quiz slides;
  • the content of the system variable cpQuizInfoAnswerChoice is updated when the Submit button is clicked; it has to be transferred to the appropriate user variable, using the After Survey event; for that purpose I created a shared action with two commands:
    Assign v_First with cpQuizInfoAnswerChoice
    Go to Next Slide
    only parameter is the user variable (here v_First)
  • apply this shared action to each of the question slides, with the appropriate parameter.

Setup Answer Review slide

In the example movie I created one text container (shape or caption) and inserted the three user variables in it. Be careful to increase the number of characters to be shown when inserting the variables. You’ll also have to leave enough space for each variable. Of course you could create multiple text containers and/or have the answers distributed over multiple slides.

Using Scrolling Text interactions

A limitation of Short Answer quiz slide is that you can have only one answer per slide. When using a Scrolling Text interaction you can have several question on a slide as you can see in the example movie.

Setup interaction

Setup of the first answer box can be seen in this screenshot:

Two important items are indicated  in the screenshot:

  1. You have to type in the name of the variable to be used. There is no way to use a dropdown list. Beware: you have to create the variable, it is not created uatomatically.
  2. To allow text to be typed in by the user, the checkbox ‘ReadOnly’ has to be unchecked. By default it is checked.

It would have been possible to enter the question in the interaction, instead of having it in a separate text container. I preferred not to do it. Reason: if the user adds the answer, instead of overwriting the question, the variable will contain html tags, like <br>.

The Submit button, which you’ll see on the slide, triggers  the (default) action ‘Go to Next Slide’.

Since I reused the three user variables in this part of the example, I have created an advanced action triggered on Enter to empty the user variables with the technique described in this article.:

Setup Answer Review slide

Very easy: duplicate the slide with the interactions, and take out the On Enter action to reset the variables. The interactions are now populated with the given answers. Moreover the learner can still edit those answers, because of the option ‘ReadOnly’ being unchecked. If you don’t want it, check the option ‘ReadOnly’ on this duplicate slide.

It is also possible to use a similar slide for the first workflow with short answer quiz slides. That will be useful if you want indeed to allow editing the answers.

Example movie

Play

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Unusual Use of Shared Actions

Intro

It is not a secret that I am a big fan of Shared Actions. It is very rare that a project I’m working on is not using at least one shared action. From what I hear and read, lot of you don’t realize how much time you can save with them. This short article will offer some ideas where Shared Actions are used for (maybe) a totally different situation than you expect.

1. Creation of Variables

If you are reading this post, it is very likely that you use system variables as well as user variables. Do you create user variables in each project, and include a proper description and eventually default values?  I have a list of variables which I use very often in projects, here are some examples:

  • v_null: an empty variable used to check if Text Entry Boxes remained empty after a learner clicked its Submit button, or to reset the variable associated with a TEB.
  • v_counter: as the name tells to track a number of clicks, attempts….
  • v_visit: for situations where the content of a slide has to be different on a later visit, you want to track if the slide has been visited
  • v_one, v_two, v_three….: number of variables that can be used for different use cases, like tracking clicks on hotspots, finishing chapters…

Knowledge fact: when you import a shared action in another project, variables not defined as parameters, will be created including the description and default value.

I have a shared action with a list of Assign commands, one for each of those often used variables. It doesn’t matter what you assign at all. I drag that shared action from my external Library with shared actions to each new project. Variables are ready for use, even as parameters in other shared actions.

2. Shared Action without Parameters

Sounds very strange, because the reusability of a shared action is based on parameters? I already gave a first example of such a parameter-less SA under 1.  It is much safer and easier to transfer a shared action to another project than an advanced action. You use the shared action directly or convert it to an advanced action if you prefer (maybe for more editing). Here is an example:

I use this action to calculate the reference time in seconds (to be used later in calculations) of a frame, mostly the first or last frame of a slide. Defined as a shared action, it needs no parameters. Once dropped into the project Library, I can use it for any frames where I want a reference time.

3. Shared Action as Template

You can copy an object or a slide, which has advanced actions attached to a new project. But that is not always working great. If you have navigation in the advanced action ‘Jump to Slide’, that command will often be reset to ‘Continue’ if that slide is not found. Same for objects, variables etc.

Less known is that any shared action can be used as a template to create an advanced action. In the top left of the Advanced Actions dialog box, you are used to see ‘Blank’ which is the default template for an action. Open the dropdown list, and you’ll find all shared actions in the project as extra templates:

Choose one of them, you’ll have to fill in the parameters, add a name, edit the commands (delete, add as you want) and save as an advanced action.

Feedback?

Do you use shared actions? Did you like these tips? Do you want to have some training about advanced/shared actions? Personalised training is the best way to get to grip with them.

I love seeing comments on my posts, and promised: you will always get an answer!

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Advanced Actions, Shared Actions, or JavaScript – Which one is right for you?

When you build your eLearning project with Adobe Captivate you have several options for customizing the way the elements or components of your project work. You can control almost every aspect of your project with Advanced Actions, Shared Actions, or JavaScript but how do you know which approach is right for your project?

When I first started working with Adobe Captivate I used Advanced Actions almost exclusively. Part of this was because they worked and part of it was because I was intimidated by Shared Actions and JavaScript. Two things I took away from building a few eLearning projects using only Advanced Actions are 1) it’s a perfectly acceptable approach, 2) it will likely result in the size of your project increasing. I found that the biggest advantage to using Advanced Actions, at least for me, is the ease of troubleshooting and making changes. It’s easy to tweak an Advanced Action when you want to change how something works and, if something isn’t working properly, it’s easy to pinpoint the mistake in an Advanced Action because you can “see” all of the commands in the action and what they are assigned to. The biggest drawback that I have witnessed to Advanced Actions is that the need to build many Advanced Actions can quickly lead to unnecessary bloat in your project. I often found myself writing the same action over and over because I needed to apply it to different buttons or different slides and before I knew what was happening I had 15 Advanced Actions that all did the same thing.

When I overcame my intimidation with Shared Actions I was able to turn those 15 Advanced Actions that did the same thing into 1 Shared Action and apply it in all 15 places that I had used the Advanced Actions and tis, I believe, is the greatest strength of a Shared Action. If you plan ahead, you can build a handful of Shared Action that you can use over and over; getting the same results you would with Advanced Actions without the project size and without the wasted time building additional actions. Another big advantage of Shared Actions is the ability to “share” actions between projects. If you have an action that is common across many of your projects you can export the action from the original project, save it on your computer, and then import it into another project when you need it. Shared Actions may be a step up from Advanced Actions but they aren’t without their drawbacks. You can’t directly edit a Shared Action once it’s been created, instead you will need to use the Shared Action as a template or model for building a new Shared Action. Another potential drawback is troubleshooting, because you can’t “see” what’s inside a Shared Action you are dependent on the names you, or the person who built the Shared Action, provided for the Shared Action’s parameters. This drawback can be mostly avoided with good authoring practices.

A word (or two) about JavaScript. There are very few things I have done using JavaScript that could not be accomplished with either Advanced Actions or Shared Actions. What I have found is that I can often increase my build speed (sometimes dramatically) by using JavaScript and, honestly, there are things I need to do in some of my more advanced projects that I can’t do with either Advanced or Shared Actions.

So, what do I use when I build a project? I usually use mostly Shared Actions with a few Advanced Actions and some JavaScript thrown in. It isn’t unusual for me to build a short Shared Action with some JavaScript attached to it. For example, I might have an Shared Action that allows the author to set the value of a variable and then execute some JavaScript I have attached that performs different functions based on the value of the variable. Could I have done this without the JavaScript? Yes, but if the Shared Action gets over complex and requires the author to input a bunch of parameters each time the Shared Action is used the using JavaScript for that part of the process can be a big time saver in the authoring process.

One final thing, I expect some of you may be thinking, “I don’t know JavaScript, should I learn it?” Should you learn it, it certainly wouldn’t hurt but it isn’t necessary either. Learn Captivate first. Learn what you can do with Advanced Actions and Shared Actions and  then worry about whether or not you should learn JavaScript.

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Using Simple Shared Actions to Simplify Your Captivate Projects

Adobe Captivate projects can quickly grow complex with duplicate actions being applied across the project. Instead of building multiple Advanced Actions to perform the same functions on different slides, buttons, and objects you can use Shared Actions to reduce simplify your project and save time building the project. In this video, I demonstrate a simple Shared Action to take the place of the Advanced Actions controlling the toggles in my sample project.

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