Whisper courses: on-the-job microlearning with email

Ich bekomme seit Jahren jeden Tag „One Word A Day“, einen kleinen Vokabeltrainer von Paul Smith; oder seit einiger Zeit „Deine tägliche Dosis Politik“ der Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung via Telegram. Nun ist auch Google bei dem Prinzip „Microlearning“ hängengeblieben und versorgt Lernende mit täglichen „bite-sized lessons“ via E-Mail. Im vorgestellten Beispiel geht es um Manager und die Aufgabe „fostering a psychologically safe team culture“. Die kurzen Lessons enthalten praktische Tipps und können bewertet werden. Und sollen offensichtlich wirkliche Effekte zeigen. By the way, auf einen kurzen Guide, ein „DIY whisper course template“, wird auch noch verlinkt.
Debbie Newhouse und Regina Getz-Kikuchi, re:Work, 12. Dezember 2017

Bildquelle: Google ([re:Work] DIY Whisper course template)

Top 10 Benefits of Microlearning in Corporate Training

You may have read about a Microsoft study that pegs the human attention span at 8 seconds while the attention span of a goldfish is believed to be 9 seconds.

We may or may not agree with the results of the study but there is clearly a need to have learning strategies that can offset the challenge of dwindling attention spans. In this blog, I highlight how usage of Microlearning is helping learners and organisations offset the challenge of dwindling attention spans and why it makes business sense for you to adopt it.

What is Microlearning?

Microlearning in corporate training is not “eLearning-lite”. So, just splicing the existing 30 minutes eLearning course into 5 nuggets does not create Microlearning nuggets.

Microlearning is short, bite-sized learning (of 3-7 mins length or shorter) that was designed to meet a specific learning outcome.

You can use Microlearning in corporate training to help learners:

  1. Learn new aspects
  2. Go deeper into specific aspects
  3. Practice
  4. Solve a particular problem
  5. Equip them on how to handle something that has changed

What are the key aspects of Microlearning in Corporate Training?

Typically, designed to be available across all devices, its multi-device capability provides flexibility to take it on desktops, laptops, tablets or smartphones.

While its usage initially began for Informal learning (notably as Performance Support or just-in-time learning aids to support or reinforce primary training), today it is being used for all aspects of corporate training including:

  1. Formal training: As a series of nuggets connected through a learning path
  2. Performance Support Tools
  3. Pre- or Post-workshop support for Instructor Led Training (ILT)
  • Microlearning in corporate training features usage of high impact, rich media formats (like animated videos, interactive videos, mobile apps and so on) to create highly engaging and immersive learning experience.
  • Coupled with advantages of short-run length and its design to meet a specific learning need, it comes as no surprise why it has gained tremendous popularity in the last two years.

What are the top 10 benefits of adopting Microlearning?

Microlearning in corporate training offers gains to both learners and to business. Here is my list of top 10 benefits that clearly illustrate why you should adopt Microlearning.

Benefits for Learners

  1. Less Time Consuming: Microlearning is ideal to mitigate the challenges of attention spans.
  2. Learner-Centric: All of us live in a world of distractions and anything that is short, easy to assimilate is certainly welcome. Nearly 80% of L&D professionals confirm that Microlearning is the preferred approach for their learners.
  3. Better Learning Experience: Use of high impact, rich media formats creates a higher engagement quotient as well as sticky learning experiences.
  4. Just-in-Time Availability: Microlearning nuggets are available to learners exactly at the moment of their need and more specifically, within their workflow. Both these factors lead to a “pull” of these assets by learners (in contrast to the “push” of traditional eLearning by L&D teams).
  5. Accessible and Flexible: Microlearning assets are designed for multi-device delivery offering learners the accessibility of the training on the device of their choice. This offers tremendous flexibility to the learners.

Benefits for Business

  1. Microlearning can be used to meet most of the corporate training needs (and for both formal and informal learning).
  2. Given shorter run lengths as compared to traditional eLearning, the Microlearning nuggets are more cost-effective.
  3. As a logical extension, Microlearning nuggets have a shorter development cycle.
  4. Microlearning is also easier to update and re-deploy.
  5. Create higher impact: Studies indicate that Microlearning based training creates 50% more engagement and leads to better completion rates and more sticky learning. When designed as Performance Support (learning aids), it improves the application of the learning on the job.

I hope this blog provides you with compelling reasons on why you should adopt Microlearning for corporate training in your organisation. If you have any queries, do contact me at apandey@eidesign.net.

 

 

5 Examples of How To Use Mobile Learning In Retail To Maximize Your Training Impact

Ways To Use Mobile Learning In Retail Industry And Face Challenges In Employees Skill Development

Skill development in retail industry is challenging. The key challenge is the rapidly changing product offerings and a pressing need to offer “just-in-time” training to the employees. There is the challenge of high employee turn-over and the need for new employees to be trained very quickly to meet the targets.

Employees often work under pressure of stiff targets and deadlines. They need learning solutions that are easily accessible and available precisely at the moment of their need.

While certain training needs can be met through classroom or Instructor-Led trainings, mLearning (or mobile learning) is the most efficient and effective way to mitigate these challenges.

What Is mLearning (Or Mobile Learning) And What Is Pushing Its Adoption?

Just look at the way mobile devices are an integral part of our life today, and it comes as no surprise that learning on these devices is a natural extension.

mLearning is an extension of the traditional eLearning and features training that is available to the learners on devices of their choice (read: tablets and smartphones). These solutions are designed for multi-device support and run seamlessly on desktops, laptops, and mobile devices.

The push for mobile learning is coming from the learners, primarily on account of the following aspects:

  • Change in learner profiles.
    Globally, the workforce has an increasing number of Millennials. As digital natives, this generation is addicted to using mobile devices.
  • Learners’ view on how they want to learn.
    The training deployment is no more limited by the way L&D teams want learners to go through it. Instead, learners ask for learning at their moment of need. The push for “just-in-time” learning aids that are available on learners’ mobile devices is very high.
  • Learning device of learner’s choice.
    Rather than be told how to consume training, today’s learners want the flexibility to learn on the device of their choice.

Not convinced? Take a look at these statistics (and plenty more that aren’t stated here) which clearly indicate the need to integrate mobile learning in your learning strategy:

  • Come 2018, 7 out of 10 professionals would be working on the go, using their personal smartphones.
  • A whopping 60% of employees feel mobile devices are their “most critical work device”.
  • Almost all the workers surveyed admitted to completing the training in mobile format.
  • Close to 47% organizations across the world have already adopted mobile learning solutions to train their workforce.

How Can mLearning (Or Mobile Learning) Help Increase The Impact Of Workforce Training In Retail?

Mobile learning is an effective approach in achieving the training goals with quality and efficiency.

Furthermore, mLearning delivered in microlearning format is probably the ideal approach to adopt, as it provides learning available to the employees on the floor, in short, bite-sized format that are easy to review, internalize, and apply.

How Can You Use mLearning (Or Mobile Learning) To Design Training Programs That Map To Retail Industry Dynamics?

mLearning is primarily known for the flexibility it offers to learners, in being able to access the training on the go, at the precise time when they need it. In addition, presenting information in a format that learners can easily understand, internalize, and apply on the job is crucial to further enhancing the value of training to both, the learners as well as the organization. Employee performance improvement is directly connected to:

  1. Easy access to the training (at the time of need).
  2. Presenting the training in an engaging format that is easy to relate to, learn, and apply in these 2 ways:
  • Using strategies that increase the learnability (or learning effectiveness) of the training.
  • Using strategies that reinforce primary training and help learners apply the learning on the job.

Once all these aspects are in place, the learning would not be acquired quickly but would be internalized for effective on-the-job application. It would be highly beneficial for the learners and will bring the required impact the business seeks.

If we look at retail industry dynamics, the need for flexibility in learning and being able to learn on the move (including within work premises) are critical factors that make mobile learning the ideal training delivery format.

You can use mLearning or mobile learning to train employees in retail industry through the following 3 approaches:

  1. For formal training.
    Do not limit your approach to traditional, structured training delivery formats. Take a step further and offer the learners flexibility through learning paths. Instead of holding discrete sessions, foster a culture that promotes learning as a continuum. This would encourage the learners to invest on learning over an extended period of time, be abreast of the latest updates, and apply the learning to attain a demonstrable gain. You can also evaluate learning portals that integrate microlearning, mobile apps, gamification, and social learning elements to double the impact of formal training.
  2. As Performance Support Tools (PSTs).
    Offering job aids (or just-in-time learning aids) for learners’ access within their workflow is a great way to trigger the desired behavioral change. You can also use PSTs to engage the learners post the formal training and facilitate reinforcement of learning.
  3. To digitize ILT.
    Blending mLearning components with the traditional ILT training format is another effective means to achieving the impact you seek. This can include pre-workshop collaterals, and/or simulations, exercises, and role-plays in the workshop, and workshop assessments. This approach lets you establish and maintain strong relations between the learners as well as between learners and instructors to provide learning nuggets post the workshop. The combination of all these elements is bound to have a direct and lasting impact on learning and application and will help you bring about the desired behavioral change in learners.

At EI Design, we have been crafting mobile learning solutions for the retail industry for over 4 years now. Let me showcase a few examples on how we have used mobile learning for formal training and as Performance Support Tools.

Our retail training solutions have been designed for the following learner profiles:

  • Store management team.
  • Store staff, including sales representatives.
  • Customer care team.
  • Sales team.

The range of our solutions cover:

  1. Induction and onboarding.
  2. Compliance training.
  3. Sales training.
  4. Specific training programs to promote key campaigns.

Here are examples that demonstrate how you can use mobile learning to mitigate training challenges in retail and create high-impact training programs that meet the training mandates.

Example 1: Induction cum Compliance Program For Apparel Retail Employees, Integrating Gamification Elements And Supplemented By Performance Support Tools (PSTs)

The course was a learning journey through 6 interactive eLearning courses, supplemented with Performance Support Tools (PSTs) in the form of interactive PDFs that promoted deep, exploratory learning in all (new and existing) employees.

For immersive learning, each module contained interactive content and a key challenge the learners must complete before moving to the next module. It also included gamification elements like points, challenges, and levels for an engaging experience and for motivating the leaners to learn effectively.

EI Design - Induction cum Compliance program for Apparel Retail employees

Example 2: Gamified Product Training For Cosmetics Retail Employees

This standard product training was converted into a highly interactive, gamified solution to make the learning sticky and experiential. Featuring multi-device compatibility, the complete learning journey was divided into two sections – learn and practice. Learners were given store-like experiences to learn the key aspects of the products and then put in customer situations to handle queries.

To make the course motivating and challenging, the exercises and activities were time based and offered bonus points for finishing the course in lesser time. Upon completing each topic, learners would earn a star, which let them advance to the next level (topic) and finally become a star salesman.

EI Design - Gamified Product Training for Cosmetics Retail employees

Example 3: Induction Program For An eCommerce Fashion Company – Designed Using Millennial-Centric Strategies

This course was designed to train new joiners within an eCommerce fashion company to get them acquainted about the company, its business drivers, and leadership competencies. Since the audience was predominantly Millennials, we used a colorful and responsive user experience, with a fashion theme to match the organization’s primary mission – to “democratize fashion”.

The course comprised three modules that could be taken independently, though they were tied together by a visual menu that depicted a journey through a gallery, a retail space, and an office. At the end of each module, learners were given a fun game that let them check their understanding of the topics covered.

EI Design - Induction program for an eCommerce Fashion company

Example 4: Retailer Engagement Platform For Product Training – Featuring Gamification And Social Learning Elements

This course was designed as a retailer engagement platform that engaged trade partners. It was a meaningful learning journey on products and categories to engage and motivate retailers to come back to it and even share it with peers.

The content of the course was transformed into a gamified learning journey across various product facilities worldwide, and it was called the “Open Tour”. It included real stories from existing content delivered through animations and videos and through stories built and shared by users. Gamification and social learning elements were embedded to promote active collaboration with peers in social media and to impart a sense of social recognition as users earned rewards and feedbacks for activities they performed.

EI Design - Retailer engagement platform for Product Training

Example 5: Interactive Food Safety Compliance Course For Food Retail Employees

This course was designed to spread awareness of the best practices in food safety for a large food retail entity. It used rich, vibrant visuals, interactivities wherever relevant, and animations for processes related to food safety and compliance procedures, to make the training lively and engaging. Questions and activities were used at strategic intervals to test the learners’ understanding of the key processes and best practices.

EI Design - Interactive Food Safety Compliance course for Food Retail

I hope this article gives you insights on how to use mobile learning (with microlearning, social learning, and gamification elements) to create highly effective training programs for employees in the retail industry. If you have further queries or need any specific support, do contact me at apandey@eidesign.net.

Source: https://www.eidesign.net/5-examples-use-mobile-learning-retail-maximize-training-impact/

What are the 3 big HR technology disruptions for 2018?

Auf Josh Bersin habe ich erst kürzlich verlinkt („HR Technology Disruptions for 2018“). Dieser Artikel enthält noch einmal so etwas wie Essenz seines Ausblicks. Er rückt hier vor allem die Bedeutung von Künstlicher Intelligenz für das Personalmanagement und seine Systeme noch einmal stärker in den Vordergrund. Er schreibt: „Nearly every HR technology vendor is now offering “machine learning,” “AI,” or some form of chatbot in their products.“

Es folgen einige Beispiele. Sie wirken zum Teil skurril, zum Teil sehr weit entfernt. Aber vielleicht werden wir uns irgendwann einmal wehmütig an diese Vorboten erinnern:

„Another vendor has an AI tool that can read documentation, identify the “learning” and “micro-learning” embedded in the language, and build a small quiz automatically. Imagine running this software against all your documentation, policy manuals, and safety procedures! It’s an instant “micro-learning” development system.“

Josh Bersin, Inside HR, 6. November 2017

Bildquelle: Markus Spiske (Unsplash)

How To Use Microlearning To Promote Informal Learning At The Workplace

Informal Learning At The Workplace: How To Foster It Using Microlearning

As we know, formal learning is structured, training developed, and deployed by Learning and Development (L&D) teams. It features:

  • Fully online training (eLearning or mLearning).
  • Facilitated training, that is, Instructor-Led Training (ILT) or Virtual Instructor-Led Training (VILT).
  • Blended training (featuring a combination of both, online training as well as facilitated training).

Typically, the control in these rollouts is with L&D teams on how they will be made available to the learners, and over what period of time they should be consumed. L&D teams also determine how learner performance should be tracked.

In contrast, informal learning is driven by the learner’s passion and motivation to learn and grow.

What Is Informal Learning?

Informal learning is learner-centric, triggered by the learner’s motivation. It provides control to the learners to choose the learning content (from various sources), based on their interest, preferences, and relevance. These can be consumed at the learner’s pace.

It is worthwhile to note here that successful use of informal learning rests on the learners. Typically, a learner who invests in informal learning is an individual who is goal-oriented, and is always on the lookout to explore, experiment, and learn.

  • Unlike formal learning, informal learning does not follow any set methodology.
  • Informal learning not only happens from structured content or programs, but also during the day as leaners interact with colleagues and seniors at (or even outside) work.
  • As mentioned earlier, informal learning is typically spontaneous, and is triggered whenever the learner encounters something that tickles their curiosity and is relevant to their personal or professional interests.
  • Informal learning rewards the learners with a sense of satisfaction by addressing and acknowledging their curiosity, subsequently expanding their knowledge base, helping them learn a new technique, or sharpen a set of skills they currently possess.

What Is The 70:20:10 Model For Learning And Development, And Where Does Informal Learning Fit In This Model?

The 70:20:10 model for Learning and Development is a commonly used approach to enhance the effectiveness of training. It is used globally to create successful learning ecosystems that boost employee performance and help create more value for business.

As per this model:

  1. 70% of the learning is experiential and happens on the job.
  2. 20% is through social or collaborative learning, that is, learning with or from others.
  3. The remaining 10% learning is delivered through formal training programs.

Undoubtedly,

  • Informal learning constitutes to the major chunk of learning that happens through the first two ways.
  • Furthermore, since informal learning is self-driven, it can be used to support formal learning, in particular, eLearning.

How Can Informal Learning Find Its Place In And Benefit Your eLearning Programs?

You can promote informal learning at your workplace by blending components of informal learning with eLearning. In this exercise, you are leveraging learner motivation to enhance the impact of your formal training (that is, eLearning, facilitated or blended training).

Here are some ways to meet this mandate:

  1. Use informal learning to prep the learners for the formal online training or ILT sessions.
  2. Use it post the formal training to help reconnect and reinforce the learning.
  3. Organize and conduct group discussions (peer-to-peer or peers-to-seniors), as part of the formal training schedule.
  4. Conduct design thinking workshops to encourage on-the-job-application.
  5. Include coaching, mentoring, or incidental support as part of your formal training.
  6. Promote collaborative and social learning using the collaboration features of your LMS and facilitating online discussions, and content curation.

This way, you can use informal learning to support your online training, or ILT sessions, as well. This will work to boost learner engagement and motivation levels, and thereby double the impact of your formal training.

How Can You Use Microlearning To Promote Informal Learning At Workplace?

If you look at the possible ways you can leverage on informal learning for eLearning programs, the first 2 aspects map to using microlearning.

Essentially, microlearning nuggets can be used to supplement and add value to both, online training or facilitated sessions, as follows:

  • For pre-learning or prepping for online training or ILT sessions.
  • For reconnecting and reinforcing learning (post online training or ILT sessions).

I have selected 6 different microlearning formats that you can use to enhance learning.

All these formats:

  • Are short and aligned to meet a specific learning outcome.
  • Feature multi-device support (work seamlessly on desktops, laptops, tablets, and smartphones).
  • Can be used to support ILT/online training.
  • Can be used to prep or reinforce formal training.

My selection includes the following 6 formats to deliver microlearning-based support for informal learning at workplace:

  1. Interactive PDFs.
  2. eBooks.
  3. Explainer videos.
  4. Whiteboard animations.
  5. Kinetic text animations.
  6. Branching scenario-based simulations.

Let’s look at each option, and see how to use microlearning to promote informal learning at your workplace.

Option 1: Pre-ILT Workshop/Prep For The Online Training

Format 1 – Interactive PDFs

You can structure reams of data into a well-structured interactive PDF format that enables the learner to quickly browse through lengthy information in seconds.

  • These formats offer interactions and layering of information that is similar to eLearning or mLearning courses.
  • They can be developed quickly, updated easily, and can pack a lot of data in a single document.
  • You can also embed audio/video links to make the learning experience more interesting and engaging.

Interactive PDF Sample 1 - EI Design

Interactive PDF Sample 2 - EI Design

Format 2 – eBooks

Like Interactive PDFs, eBook formats also enable you to share lengthy information in bite-sized chunks. However, eBooks don’t offer interactivities and have a linear flow and structure. eBooks are designed to be print-friendly, and can be offered as a job aid that can be made available within the learner’s workflow.

eBook Sample 1 - EI Design

eBook Sample 2 - EI Design

Option 2: Post The Online Training Or ILT Sessions

Format 1 – Explainer videos

Using explainer videos is a great way to recap the primary learning. In a bite-sized format, you can visually showcase highlights of the formal training. More significantly, this can be used as effectively as a job aid that can be made available to the learners within their workflow, on the device of their choice. This flexibility will ensure that learners browse through this, and can use it to reinforce their learning.

Explainer Video Sample 1 - EI Design

Explainer Video Sample 2 - EI Design

Format 2 – Whiteboard animations

Often, complex concepts can be taught through very simple design techniques. Whiteboard animations that feature hand-drawn imagery, can demystify complex learning concepts. Available in short bites, these can be used to recap and reinforce primary learning.

Whiteboard Animation Sample 1 - EI Design

Whiteboard Animation Sample 2 - EI Design

Format 3 – Kinetic text animations

Sometimes, the content of primary training is not amenable to be converted to visual-based concepts. For instance, when we want to highlight a process, checklist, or best practices, using kinetic text-based animations is the right answer. Through text animation accompanied by minor special effects, you can create bite-sized learning nuggets that can be used to recap and reinforce the primary learning.

Kinetic Animation Sample 1 - EI Design

Kinetic Animation Sample 2 - EI Design

Format 4 – Branching scenario-based simulations

When you want to check if the learner can apply the learning of the formal training, you can use this technique to help them practice what they have learned in a safe environment.

This technique can handle simple scenarios to very complex decision-making situations featuring a series of situations.

Branching scenario-based simulation sample 1-EI Design

Branching scenario-based simulation sample 2-EI Design

 

Take a look at this explainer video we have created to summarize the key points (including the 6 examples) covered in this article.

 

I hope this article provides the required perspective on how to use microlearning to promote informal learning at your workplace. If you have any queries, do contact me at apandey@eidesign.net.

Source: https://www.eidesign.net/use-microlearning-to-promote-informal-learning-at-workplace/

HR Technology For 2018: Ten Disruptions Ahead

Auch dieses Jahr soll der Ausblick des Analysten nicht fehlen. Josh Bersin hat wieder das Spielfeld der HR-Plattformen, Systeme und Tools vermessen und auf 10 „big changes“ heruntergebrochen. Natürlich gilt auch für 2017: „… things are changing faster than ever“. Und natürlich ist fast jeder Trend „most important“ und „the next big thing“. Das gehört zum Klappern des Analysten. Aber was zählt Josh Bersin nun auf?

1. A Massive Shift From „Automation“ To „Productivity“. Weg von der ausschließlichen Suche nach Effizienz. Alle wollen produktiver, kreativer, agiler werden. Kann HR (Software) hier unterstützen?
2. Acceleration Of HRMS And HCM Cloud Solutions, But Not The Center Of Everything. Die Cloud kommt, aber es dauert etwas. Weil es die gesamte Architektur betrifft.
3. Continuous Performance Management Is Here: And You Should Get With It
4. Feedback, Engagement, And Analytics Tools Reign. Hier (zwischen 3 und 4) habe ich fließende Übergänge gesehen. Die Richtung: Das Ende des jährlichen Mitarbeitergesprächs und der Zielvereinbarung. Hin zu Live-Daten und Dashboards. „… but this is still a new world“.

5. Reinvention Of Corporate Learning Is Here (im letzten Jahr hieß es „The Continuing Explosion and Evolution of the Learning Market“, aber das nur am Rande)

“ … a new breed of corporate learning tools has finally arrived, and companies are snapping them up quickly.

These include the „experience platforms,“ a new breed of „micro-learning platforms,“ modernized LMS systems, and new AI-based systems to recommend learning, find learning, and deliver learning. Virtual Reality-based learning is now alive and well, and I expect to see smarter and smarter technologies to help us find „just what we need“ along the lines of performance support. And you can now buy systems that let employees publish and share content without any major effort on your part.“

6. The Recruiting Market Is Thriving With Innovation. Der „war for talent“ ist wieder da. Hier spielt die Musik!
7. The Wellbeing Market Is Exploding. Health, Burnout, jetzt Human Performance. „The next big thing.“ Wenn nicht Privatsphäre und Datenschutz wären. Aber die bringt der amerikanische Analyst erst beim nächsten Punkt ins Spiel.
8. People Analytics Matures And Grows. Jetzt kommen Big Data und AI zu ihrem Recht. Doch: Mehr Daten als Fragen.
9. Intelligent Self-Service Tools. Wieder AI. Und die Frage, wer Ordnung in das Ganze bringt. Aber Josh Bersin sucht noch den richtigen Begriff für diesen Markt …
10. Innovation Within HR Itself. HR als Treiber und „disruptor“. Klingt etwas nach Wunschdenken.

Josh Bersin, Forbes, 2. November 2017

Instructional Design Tips to Create eLearning to Train Corporate Millennial Workforce

Millennial-Employees_Swift-Elearning

“Modern Instructional Design can address the millennial learning needs and help you create an effective eLearning.” In this blog, we will discuss the modern digital learning needs along with the corresponding instructional design tips to create learner-centered corporate eLearning.

But What is the Need?

Retaining talents is one of the biggest challenges in the corporate world. Despite every effort, corporates now have a hard time to retain employees and achieve their strategic business goals.

In the current business landscape, Millennial generation also known as Gen Y represents a major proportion of the workforce. Typically, they keep on switching their jobs throughout their career. One of the major reasons for this could be the ineffective learning and development initiatives. And traditional training approaches may not address their learning needs and preferences. Therefore, it essential to assess, review and modify the learning and development practices to effectively develop Millennial talent. The best solution would be to devise online training based on modern instructional design.

But Who Are Millennials?

Millennials, are the most diverse, tech-savvy, confident generation who tend to be little impatient at times. And surveys suggest that the good work-life balance and appropriate learning and development opportunities could create an ideal job environment for them.

Characteristics of Millennials

Tech Savvy Conventional Ambitious Team-oriented
Highly Optimistic Multitaskers Gadget Lovers Self-directed
Open-minded Competitive Self-centered Impatient
Collaborative More Diverse Flexible Skeptical

How to Design Training for Millennial Employees?

As an instructional designer, it is imperative to understand the learning preferences of millennials and design the learning that better aligns with them. So, before we move further, let’s meet Mr. Jack, a young professional. Lets understand his learning preferences better along with the top four instructional design tips to create effective eLearning.

Are you ready?

Meet Jack, Gen Y, to Know His Learning Preferences

Learning-Preferences_Swift-Elearning

I love relevancy: Well, I am driven by a strong sense of purpose. I feel disconnected when the training is no more relevant to me. I always wanted to know what am I doing and why am I doing it. So make the learning more meaningful, contextualized and personalized for me.

Bite-sized learning interests me: Though I am a quick learner, my attention span is considered to be short – less than gold fish. Bite-sized learning or microlearning strategy would be ideal for me because I can digest the short, sweet, succinct learning nuggets easily. So please do not dump the text-heavy content and increase my cognitive load. Video-based eLearning can as well be effective for me to retain the information.

Encourage me during the training: Appreciations and rewards give me a sense of accomplishment during learning and this certainly motivates me to do better. I also need immediate feedback and direction to proceed. You can provide me virtual rewards such as badges, points and currencies throughout the course. Gamification can be the best strategy to completely engage me.

Traditional learning methodologies are boring: As an experiential and exploratory learner, I prefer active learning methods that incorporate more multimedia, gamification and collaboration. In one word, the learning should be interactive and provide me with immediate and continuous feedback.

Embrace digital learning technologies such as mobile learning, learning analytics, gamification, augmented reality and virtual reality to get the best out of online training.

Conclusion

So let’s adapt the modern instructional strategies as part of on-going training to meet the needs of ever growing digital millennial workforce. Hope this post would help you focus on the areas in creating an effective and engaging eLearning courses.

Please do share what other instructional design strategies do you adopt to bring the desired learning outcomes in the corporate online training.

Source linkhttp://www.swiftelearningservices.com/instructional-design-tips-to-create-elearning-to-train-corporate-millennial-workforce/

Instructional Design Tips to Create eLearning to Train Corporate Millennial Workforce

Millennial-Employees_Swift-Elearning

“Modern Instructional Design can address the millennial learning needs and help you create an effective eLearning.” In this blog, we will discuss the modern digital learning needs along with the corresponding instructional design tips to create learner-centered corporate eLearning.

But What is the Need?

Retaining talents is one of the biggest challenges in the corporate world. Despite every effort, corporates now have a hard time to retain employees and achieve their strategic business goals.

In the current business landscape, Millennial generation also known as Gen Y represents a major proportion of the workforce. Typically, they keep on switching their jobs throughout their career. One of the major reasons for this could be the ineffective learning and development initiatives. And traditional training approaches may not address their learning needs and preferences. Therefore, it essential to assess, review and modify the learning and development practices to effectively develop Millennial talent. The best solution would be to devise online training based on modern instructional design.

But Who Are Millennials?

Millennials, are the most diverse, tech-savvy, confident generation who tend to be little impatient at times. And surveys suggest that the good work-life balance and appropriate learning and development opportunities could create an ideal job environment for them.

Characteristics of Millennials

Tech Savvy Conventional Ambitious Team-oriented
Highly Optimistic Multitaskers Gadget Lovers Self-directed
Open-minded Competitive Self-centered Impatient
Collaborative More Diverse Flexible Skeptical

How to Design Training for Millennial Employees?

As an instructional designer, it is imperative to understand the learning preferences of millennials and design the learning that better aligns with them. So, before we move further, let’s meet Mr. Jack, a young professional. Lets understand his learning preferences better along with the top four instructional design tips to create effective eLearning.

Are you ready?

Meet Jack, Gen Y, to Know His Learning Preferences

Learning-Preferences_Swift-Elearning

I love relevancy: Well, I am driven by a strong sense of purpose. I feel disconnected when the training is no more relevant to me. I always wanted to know what am I doing and why am I doing it. So make the learning more meaningful, contextualized and personalized for me.

Bite-sized learning interests me: Though I am a quick learner, my attention span is considered to be short – less than gold fish. Bite-sized learning or microlearning strategy would be ideal for me because I can digest the short, sweet, succinct learning nuggets easily. So please do not dump the text-heavy content and increase my cognitive load. Video-based eLearning can as well be effective for me to retain the information.

Encourage me during the training: Appreciations and rewards give me a sense of accomplishment during learning and this certainly motivates me to do better. I also need immediate feedback and direction to proceed. You can provide me virtual rewards such as badges, points and currencies throughout the course. Gamification can be the best strategy to completely engage me.

Traditional learning methodologies are boring: As an experiential and exploratory learner, I prefer active learning methods that incorporate more multimedia, gamification and collaboration. In one word, the learning should be interactive and provide me with immediate and continuous feedback.

Embrace digital learning technologies such as mobile learning, learning analytics, gamification, augmented reality and virtual reality to get the best out of online training.

Conclusion

So let’s adapt the modern instructional strategies as part of on-going training to meet the needs of ever growing digital millennial workforce. Hope this post would help you focus on the areas in creating an effective and engaging eLearning courses.

Please do share what other instructional design strategies do you adopt to bring the desired learning outcomes in the corporate online training.

Source linkhttp://www.swiftelearningservices.com/instructional-design-tips-to-create-elearning-to-train-corporate-millennial-workforce/

A Case Study on Microlearning as Performance Support to Reinforce Existing Training

Microlearning Case Study_Swift Elearning

Microlearning, one of the hottest eLearning trends, is catching attention amongst eLearning fraternity like never before. Our recent discussion on a LinkedIn group received a stream of thoughts and perspectives on microlearning. In this blog, we will discuss the microlearning case study that illustrates how we’ve developed and delivered microlearning course/application as performance support to reinforce existing training.

Before we could explore the case study, let’s first understand what microlearning actually means. “Microlearning is not just bite-sized eLearning content that is chunked to deliver short bursts of information, but it is more than that…”

Then What is Microlearning?

Microlearning is a modern instructional design strategy that:

  • Aligns with the modern, tech-savvy workforce with shorter attention spans
  • Focusses on one specific learning outcome
  • Provides just-in-time performance support to reinforce learning and improves retention
  • Enables learners to choose when and what they need to learn at the moment of need
  • Is most cost-effective way to develop and deliver online training

Microlearning Case Study Overview:

  • Instructional Design Strategy: Microlearning Solution as performance support
  • Industry: Agriculture – Livestock Industry
  • Target Audience: Veterinary Paraprofessionals
  • Technology: HTML5 & Adobe Captivate and Android

About Client

Our client, a reputed Veterinary Research agency, is responsible to control and prevent the spread of livestock diseases. As part of their mission, they hired young veterinary professionals and trained them on:

  • preventive measures,
  • recognition of clinical signs and
  • veterinary best practices to minimize the diseases and improve animal health.

What was the Challenge?

The paraprofessionals will go through the online training which will be 2 hours seat, attempt the final quiz and get certified. On the field it was difficult for the paraprofessionals to remember every bit they learned in the training. And when they are on field they cannot access the course and look for the symptoms.

As a result, they couldn’t translate their learning on the field. Most of them would call the agency or their peers to identify clinical signs and other issues instead of resolving themselves.

Our client realized these shortcomings and approached Swift for a better learning solution that could be developed cost-effectively in a shorter timeframe.

How Did We Help?

The long training sessions and lengthy eLearning courses loaded with lots of information, but everything cannot be remembered all the time. We then proposed bite-sized microlearning approach to provide just-in-time information to supplement primary eLearning or ILT programs.

Our Microlearning Strategy Was Simple…

We ensured that the microlearning content is:

  • Well organized and easily accessible – Allowing learners to search and sort the required learning content needed at that point of time
  • Concise and contextual with bite-sized learning nuggets of 5-7 minutes focused towards one specific learning objective
  • Interactive and visually appealing with simple interface to drive learner engagement through mobile learning
  • Cross-device compatible, delivered through mobile platform – multi-device learning
  • Embedded with short videos highlighting the best practices
  • Mobile friendly and responsive – published in HTML5 via Adobe Captivate

What Was the Impact?

The quick and cost-effective Microlearning strategy yielded better results. Learners could pick and choose the relevant lessons at the point of need. There was a drastic improvement in their performance.

Short and specific learning nuggets along with reduced cognitive overload and reinforced what has been learnt. This just-in-time solution resulted in active learning.

Though microlearning is a good strategy, it is not a silver bullet for every learning solution. We must be wise enough to choose the appropriate learning strategies before we could actually design it.

Source Link: http://www.swiftelearningservices.com/microlearning-case-study/

Mein Wochenausklang: Brauchen wir „Microlearning“?

In diesen Wochen erreicht mich wieder eine Fülle an Webinar-Angeboten. Ab und zu melde ich mich für eines an, und ab und zu raffe ich mich dann tatsächlich auf, auch einmal reinzuhören. Diese Woche ging es um „Micro-Learning and Gamification“. Ich bin dann doch zur Halbzeit aus dem Angebot ausgestiegen, weil es eher an Einsteiger adressiert war. Aber über den Begriff Microlearning habe ich noch eine Weile nachgedacht.

Ich weiß noch, dass es 2005 eine Microlearning-Konferenz in Innsbruck gab. Auf dieser (oder der nächsten, 2006?) bin ich gewesen. Damals führte der Begriff Microlearning noch beide Welten zusammen: die Internet-Avantgarde, die von Hypertext, RSS und „small pieces, loosely joined“ schwärmte; und die EdTech-Vertreter, die schon an neue Anwendungen für das mobile Lernen glaubten. Mit dem iPhone und YouTube haben dann die letzteren das Feld und den Begriff übernommen.

Was aber den Umgang mit Microlearning nicht leichter gemacht hat. Zwar ist man sich heute einig, dass mit Blick auf Nutzungsroutinen, Aufmerksamkeitsspannen und Vergessenskurven kein Weg an kurzen Lerneinheiten vorbeiführt. Aber hat man damit schon ein pädagogisches Konzept? Wenn ich den Begriff zum Beispiel in der „Mediendidaktik“ von Michael Kerres nachschlage, so werde ich zum Kapitel „Behaviorismus“ geführt. Dort wird Microlearning mit dem mobilen Lernen zusammengebracht, aber auch mit der Warnung, dass sich in kurzen Zeitfenstern nur begrenzte Lerninhalte, sprich: Faktenwissen, sinnvoll bearbeiten lassen. Es liest sich eher wie eine Verlegenheitslösung.

Im eingangs erwähnten Webinar gab es ein Schaubild mit einer Gegenüberstellung von Microlearning und Macrolearning (der Begriff war mir, das nur am Rande, neu). Microlearning, so heißt es da unter anderem, kommt ins Spiel, wenn ich sofort eine Antwort benötige („I need help now“), Macrolearning dagegen antwortet auf „I want to learn something new“. Das eine ist getrieben durch meine Fragen, beim anderen werde ich von Experten geführt. Aber auch diese Unterscheidung wirft Fragen auf, und ich bin nicht sicher, ob sie es in die Neuauflage der „Mediendidaktik“ schaffen wird.

Vielleicht, so mein heutiges Fazit, erweitert Microlearning vor allem den Blick: darauf, dass Lernen ein kontinuierlicher Prozess ist, in dem „große Lernblöcke“ durch kleine Impulse eingeleitet oder durch kurze Refresher fortgeführt werden können; darauf, dass Lernen formal und informell stattfindet und an vielen Stellen, oft hinter unserem Rücken, fest in unseren Alltag eingebettet ist. „Alte“ Newsletter-Dienste versuchen auch, solche Impulse zu setzen. Heute kommen sie als Messenger-Dienste via WhatsApp oder Telegram daher, wie die „tägliche Dosis Politik“ der Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung. Auch eine Form von Microlearning!?