Augmented Reality – A New Dawn of Possibilities in Online Training / eLearning

Augmented Reality – A New Dawn of Possibilities in Online Training eLearning

Augmented Reality – sounds like high-tech si-fi phenomenon. Isn’t it?

Every new invention takes its place in our daily lives giving us a similar experience. In the beginning, it astonishes and makes us a passive observant. But as time passes, we start sensing its obvious presence in our environment. Once we adapt to it, in no time we tend to grow curious to figure out its capabilities and take advantage of them in making our lives better and easier. Augmented Reality is one of the finest examples of such inventions. In this blog, we will discuss the possibilities of Augmented Reality in digital learning – eLearning Industry as well as Learning and Development field.

The concept of augmenting the real world by virtual data has started in late 1970s. In 1990, Augmented Reality (AR) was coined by Tom Caudell. Since then, Augmented Reality has been adopted by few large corporations for visualization and training purposes. Thanks to the phenomenal computing capabilities today’s smartphones and computers possess, opening new doors for augmented reality to enrich our daily lives.

Areas where introduction of Augmented Reality made a difference in digital learning/online training:

Augmented reality in Education AR in Vocational Training AR in Logistic Handling Augmented reality in Marketing Augmented reality in Product Demo
Education Vocational Training Logistic
Handling
Marketing Product Demonstrations

What is Augmented Reality?

Augmented reality is one of the major inventions which is changing the way we experience the world. It allows us to interact and explore virtual information/content/objects in real physical environment. Augmented reality is not about a device or better computing, it is about changing our way or approach to experience, explore and learn. It is usually a 2D image, like something that is printed on a poster. As the augmented reality app perceive its target through the camera it processes the image and augments it with pictures, sound and animations. For instance, we may see a static 2D image on a paper comes to life and speaks or responds to our actions. Provided, we look at the image through the augmented Reality (AR) application.

Augmented Reality in Education

Augmented Reality (AR) technology has dramatically shifted the location and timing of learning and training.

Johnson, et. al. (2010) stated, “AR has strong potential to provide both powerful contextual, on-site learning experiences and serendipitous exploration and discovery of the connected nature of information in the real world.”

Shelton, B. E. (2002) estimated that AR has not been much adopted into academic settings due to little financial support from the government and lack of the awareness of needs for AR in academic settings.

With the current stage of advancement in AR technology; cost has not remained a critical concern. Several different forms of AR technological applications have been developed. For example, the concept of Interactive Books could be a cost effective alternative compared to Object Modeling for industries.

Areas of AR applications in learning and development or eLearning or Online Training

The current ongoing research has identified, the following five areas of AR applications:

  • Discovery Learning – In museums, learners can access AR mobile applications and discover historical events by exploring various sections and arsenals. The AR mobile application helps learners to access relevant videos, maps or audio content. Learners can hold up their phone against a statue and information would appear on screen.
  • Objects Modeling – Learners love to use their hands and brain in their learning process. Using AR technology, medical students can explore model of human anatomy to study different parts and their features individually separated from each other. AR enables learner to interact with the model by rotating it in any direction and have a full 3600 They can even have exploded view of the object to observe its sub-parts. As there is no use of monitor, learner can enlarge the model to any size. Simultaneously, two learners can study the same model wearing Microsoft HoloLense.
  • Interactive Books – Augmented reality books are like any other books except some digital content is embedded into them. When the pages are placed in front of mobile device camera, 3D elements, animations, audio comes to life through the device.
  • Skills Training – Technicians need training to acquire assembly and maintenance skills important for their respective industry machine. Using AR technology, digital content can be linked to machine parts. Using camera-enabled handheld devices, technicians can learn through explainer animations and other graphic content.

To Conclude…
Augmented Reality combined with mobile learning is going to provide awesome and engaging learning experience with its wide spectrum of possible applications in the eLearning world. We must be curious and contrive new possibilities to improve online learning / eLearning outcomes.

We recommend you to checkout our upcoming posts on different aspects of Augmented Reality in Education specific to eLearning.

Source Link: http://www.swiftelearningservices.com/augmented-reality-a-new-dawn-of-possibilities-in-online-training-elearning/

Instructional Design Tips to Create eLearning to Train Corporate Millennial Workforce

Millennial-Employees_Swift-Elearning

“Modern Instructional Design can address the millennial learning needs and help you create an effective eLearning.” In this blog, we will discuss the modern digital learning needs along with the corresponding instructional design tips to create learner-centered corporate eLearning.

But What is the Need?

Retaining talents is one of the biggest challenges in the corporate world. Despite every effort, corporates now have a hard time to retain employees and achieve their strategic business goals.

In the current business landscape, Millennial generation also known as Gen Y represents a major proportion of the workforce. Typically, they keep on switching their jobs throughout their career. One of the major reasons for this could be the ineffective learning and development initiatives. And traditional training approaches may not address their learning needs and preferences. Therefore, it essential to assess, review and modify the learning and development practices to effectively develop Millennial talent. The best solution would be to devise online training based on modern instructional design.

But Who Are Millennials?

Millennials, are the most diverse, tech-savvy, confident generation who tend to be little impatient at times. And surveys suggest that the good work-life balance and appropriate learning and development opportunities could create an ideal job environment for them.

Characteristics of Millennials

Tech Savvy Conventional Ambitious Team-oriented
Highly Optimistic Multitaskers Gadget Lovers Self-directed
Open-minded Competitive Self-centered Impatient
Collaborative More Diverse Flexible Skeptical

How to Design Training for Millennial Employees?

As an instructional designer, it is imperative to understand the learning preferences of millennials and design the learning that better aligns with them. So, before we move further, let’s meet Mr. Jack, a young professional. Lets understand his learning preferences better along with the top four instructional design tips to create effective eLearning.

Are you ready?

Meet Jack, Gen Y, to Know His Learning Preferences

Learning-Preferences_Swift-Elearning

I love relevancy: Well, I am driven by a strong sense of purpose. I feel disconnected when the training is no more relevant to me. I always wanted to know what am I doing and why am I doing it. So make the learning more meaningful, contextualized and personalized for me.

Bite-sized learning interests me: Though I am a quick learner, my attention span is considered to be short – less than gold fish. Bite-sized learning or microlearning strategy would be ideal for me because I can digest the short, sweet, succinct learning nuggets easily. So please do not dump the text-heavy content and increase my cognitive load. Video-based eLearning can as well be effective for me to retain the information.

Encourage me during the training: Appreciations and rewards give me a sense of accomplishment during learning and this certainly motivates me to do better. I also need immediate feedback and direction to proceed. You can provide me virtual rewards such as badges, points and currencies throughout the course. Gamification can be the best strategy to completely engage me.

Traditional learning methodologies are boring: As an experiential and exploratory learner, I prefer active learning methods that incorporate more multimedia, gamification and collaboration. In one word, the learning should be interactive and provide me with immediate and continuous feedback.

Embrace digital learning technologies such as mobile learning, learning analytics, gamification, augmented reality and virtual reality to get the best out of online training.

Conclusion

So let’s adapt the modern instructional strategies as part of on-going training to meet the needs of ever growing digital millennial workforce. Hope this post would help you focus on the areas in creating an effective and engaging eLearning courses.

Please do share what other instructional design strategies do you adopt to bring the desired learning outcomes in the corporate online training.

Source linkhttp://www.swiftelearningservices.com/instructional-design-tips-to-create-elearning-to-train-corporate-millennial-workforce/

Instructional Design Tips to Create eLearning to Train Corporate Millennial Workforce

Millennial-Employees_Swift-Elearning

“Modern Instructional Design can address the millennial learning needs and help you create an effective eLearning.” In this blog, we will discuss the modern digital learning needs along with the corresponding instructional design tips to create learner-centered corporate eLearning.

But What is the Need?

Retaining talents is one of the biggest challenges in the corporate world. Despite every effort, corporates now have a hard time to retain employees and achieve their strategic business goals.

In the current business landscape, Millennial generation also known as Gen Y represents a major proportion of the workforce. Typically, they keep on switching their jobs throughout their career. One of the major reasons for this could be the ineffective learning and development initiatives. And traditional training approaches may not address their learning needs and preferences. Therefore, it essential to assess, review and modify the learning and development practices to effectively develop Millennial talent. The best solution would be to devise online training based on modern instructional design.

But Who Are Millennials?

Millennials, are the most diverse, tech-savvy, confident generation who tend to be little impatient at times. And surveys suggest that the good work-life balance and appropriate learning and development opportunities could create an ideal job environment for them.

Characteristics of Millennials

Tech Savvy Conventional Ambitious Team-oriented
Highly Optimistic Multitaskers Gadget Lovers Self-directed
Open-minded Competitive Self-centered Impatient
Collaborative More Diverse Flexible Skeptical

How to Design Training for Millennial Employees?

As an instructional designer, it is imperative to understand the learning preferences of millennials and design the learning that better aligns with them. So, before we move further, let’s meet Mr. Jack, a young professional. Lets understand his learning preferences better along with the top four instructional design tips to create effective eLearning.

Are you ready?

Meet Jack, Gen Y, to Know His Learning Preferences

Learning-Preferences_Swift-Elearning

I love relevancy: Well, I am driven by a strong sense of purpose. I feel disconnected when the training is no more relevant to me. I always wanted to know what am I doing and why am I doing it. So make the learning more meaningful, contextualized and personalized for me.

Bite-sized learning interests me: Though I am a quick learner, my attention span is considered to be short – less than gold fish. Bite-sized learning or microlearning strategy would be ideal for me because I can digest the short, sweet, succinct learning nuggets easily. So please do not dump the text-heavy content and increase my cognitive load. Video-based eLearning can as well be effective for me to retain the information.

Encourage me during the training: Appreciations and rewards give me a sense of accomplishment during learning and this certainly motivates me to do better. I also need immediate feedback and direction to proceed. You can provide me virtual rewards such as badges, points and currencies throughout the course. Gamification can be the best strategy to completely engage me.

Traditional learning methodologies are boring: As an experiential and exploratory learner, I prefer active learning methods that incorporate more multimedia, gamification and collaboration. In one word, the learning should be interactive and provide me with immediate and continuous feedback.

Embrace digital learning technologies such as mobile learning, learning analytics, gamification, augmented reality and virtual reality to get the best out of online training.

Conclusion

So let’s adapt the modern instructional strategies as part of on-going training to meet the needs of ever growing digital millennial workforce. Hope this post would help you focus on the areas in creating an effective and engaging eLearning courses.

Please do share what other instructional design strategies do you adopt to bring the desired learning outcomes in the corporate online training.

Source linkhttp://www.swiftelearningservices.com/instructional-design-tips-to-create-elearning-to-train-corporate-millennial-workforce/

Weighing The Benefits Of Print Learning Against eLearning

There are still naysayers perpetuating a “digital divide” of sorts between eLearning and print learning, especially in higher education. Is this digital divide justified? Is it possible that there is still merit in print learning over eLearning, and other digital solutions to pedagogy?

This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

What’s a NGDLE?

I think we’re all interested in what our VLE or LMS will look like, or indeed what it should already look like. Whilst much has been talked and written about it, perhaps this visualisation from Bryan Mathers is the best view of it yet – the “Next- Generation Digital Learning Environment (NGDLE)”. And it incorporates Lego so well – the Lego base is the overall requirement with each building ‘block’ being added as and when they’re required – personalisation, collaboration, accessibility, etc.

According to the Educause report, the emerging needs of a NGDLE are these:
“Its principal functional domains are interoperability; personalization; analytics, advising, and learning assessment; collaboration; and accessibility and universal design. Since no single application can deliver in all those domains, we recommend a “Lego” approach to realizing the NGDLE, where NGDLE-conforming components are built that allow individuals and institutions the opportunity to construct learning environments tailored to their requirements and goals.”

So what will a NGDLE look like?

So what will a NGDLE look like? by @bryanMMathers is licensed under CC-BY-ND

When PowerPoint goes bad

What are your pet peeves about using PowerPoint? Is it the tool itself or how people use it?

I use PowerPoint, and think it is a good way to engage students and staff, and can be used as a way to spur enjoyment, engagement and interest in your subject. But that’s more about how the tool is used rather than the tool itself. So, here are some observations I’ve made over the years about PowerPoint, and how people use it ‘badly’:

  • Font – Inconsistent use of fonts across the slide deck, or even on the same slide. Using fonts that really don’t work on screen (like Times New Roman), or using Comic Sans. Please. Don’t.
  • Images – So you found Google images or another such image search. You’ve copied the image to your slide and it looks good. It doesn’t. That small image might look OK on your screen, but test it in a classroom or lecture theatre, you’ve stretched it so much it’s pixelated so much it’s almost unrecognisable.
  • Words – Writing your whole lesson in PowerPoint and spending half the lesson with your back to the class so you can read from the projector screen. Same goes if you stand behind the lectern PC and read of that screen instead.
  • Bullet points – PowerPoint makes it too easy to use them, but that doesn’t mean you should (yes, I can see the irony as I’m using them here too).
  • Colour / Templates – Just because you can lots of colour or standard PowerPoint templates doesn’t mean you should. Keep it simple so your key message shines through – the more colour / mess on the slide will only detract or hide your content.
  • Charts / Tables – Do you really need that chart or table that shows 50 different points of information.
  • Animation – I’ve never found animated stars or arrows to help the presentation. If the slide is structured properly you shouldn’t need them.
  • Clipart – Please. Don’t.
  • Volume – You may feel that your one hour presentation needs 100 slides. I’m pretty sure your audience/class doesn’t. 

If in doubt about any aspect of your use of PowerPoint, the best time to find out how you’re doing is now, while you’ve time to go and check it all out and not half way through the most important presentation of your career. Would you rather a slightly awkward conversation in private now or suddenly realise the conference venue has emptied for lunch 45 minutes early, just after you start your 16th of 135 slides?

Go find your friendly learning technologist (yes, we are friendly!), ask us to look over it and tell you what we think. We will be honest but we’ll be critical and, most importantly, constructive. We will offer support and suggestions, we will give your pointers on how to cut the information on the slides (and how to deliver it too, if you want) and we will be there to help you feel comfortable creating slide decks in future and deliver them. Every learning technologist I’ve ever met will do this, without question and without judgement; we’re just happy we can offer our expertise and make your job easier (and more successful).

There are plenty of online tutorials and help websites if you want to find out yourself about using PowerPoint ‘well’. Try sites like this and this and this.

If in doubt this video – Life after death by PowerPoint – will help you see the error of your ways.

Image source: EU PVSEC (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)