Updating a video published as HTML5 on a server

I just changed a few words in the cptx file, and I don’t want to have to update all of the folders and files associated with the video if I don’t have to . Can you tell me which file(s) needs to be updated on the server when  you just change text in the CPTX file?

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How to Make Animated Gifs from Video

how to create animated gif

Some people asked how I created the animated .gifs similar to the ones I gave away for free in this recent blog post. So today I’ll share a simple way to create them.

Start with Animated .Gif Software

There are a number of tools to create animated .gifs. I’m going to focus on just one for this post.

Screen2Gif is free and you don’t need to install it. Just run the .EXE file. It’s a great product and I use it all the time for quick demos or some of the animations I use in the blog.

I’m not going to do an exhaustive overview, so I recommend downloading the app and playing with it a bit. It’s intuitive and easy to figure out. As a side note, if you do use it, I encourage supporting the developer.

Understanding the Cover Image .Gifs

Cover images are mostly decorative. And because of the responsive nature of the Rise courses, the cover image gets cropped based on the screen’s aspect ratio. That means what you see in portrait won’t look the same in landscape.

animated .gif responsive design

The key is keep the cover images simple. Animated .gifs can become very large files. The more visual information on the screen, the larger the file size. And if the file is too large, it’ll take too long to download and ruin the effect and experience.

Stick with fewer colors. Solid backgrounds are good because you don’t get that blocky color striping that you get with pictures.

We’ll look at two ways to create the cover image animated .gifs. One way is by recording something onscreen and the other is to import a video.

Record Screen to Create Animated .Gif

The easiest thing it to play a video and record the screen. Then do some basic editing. Since the animated .gif is decorative, you just need something simple. The key is not to have a massive file. The more you record, the larger the file.

View the animated .gif tutorial on Youtube

Once you have a recording, figure out what you want and where to cut it. Again, I look for something simple that looks good looping. Subtle movements or repeating animations (like a spinning gear) work perfectly.

It does take some messing around. I usually do a basic edit and then save the file to see how large it is. Then I play around with more edits and image size to find the right balance between quality and file size.

You’ll have a lot more luck recording vector images that are solid versus photos. The less the screen has to change from one frame to the next, the better quality you’ll get and smaller file size.

For the .gifs where the quality doesn’t look as good, I set the cover images’s overlay color darker. This way the text really pops off the screen and the animation quality isn’t as much of an issue. That’s what I did in this example where there were so many colors it just didn’t look as good as I wanted.

Import a Video to Create Animated .Gif

Screen2Gif makes it really easy to import a video. It breaks down all the frames and from there it’s just a matter of editing it to what you want.

Just like above, play around with different settings to see what gives you the right balance between file size and quality. And keep in mind, they’re header images so subtle movement is fine. For this overhead desk video, I just focused on the pencil moving and cut out hundreds of frames.

View the animated .gif tutorial on Youtube

Bonus tips:

  • You won’t get crisp images because the file size needs to be manageable. I try not to go over 1.5 MB. That’s why you have to play around with settings that strike the right balance.
  • You need to test different dimensions, but I generally keep the images somewhere between a 16:9 and 2:1 aspect ratio. There’s no golden rule. It’s mostly based on what you are showing. The image is going to crop based on the screen, anyway. I make different versions and modify the image size to see what I get for file size and quality.

animated gifs from vector videos

  • Solid and/or fewer colors is best. There are a lot of free or inexpensive ways to create simple vector-based animation videos. That’s what I did to create these two headers above which you can see in these two examples: Call Center and Team Meeting. I inserted some animated characters and published a video. Then I made the .gif from the video. Because I’m not building a big animated explainer video, this only took a few minutes to do and looks decent.

Animated .gifs add some flavor and visual novelty to your courses. And as you can see, they’re easy to create.


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Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

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Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

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How to Create Videos in PowerPoint

create videos in PowerPoint

One of my favorite features in PowerPoint is saving the PowerPoint slideshow as a video. That means anything you put on the PowerPoint slides (from animations to slide transitions) is output as video. With some creativity, you can pull together some pretty slick explainer-type presentations with a tool most of us already have.

Today, I want to show something simple that may give you some ideas for your own training videos.

Create Videos in PowerPoint: Examples

Before we get started, here’s a cool example from Duarte that Microsoft included in the PowerPoint 2010 template pack. The Duarte team created a great presentation that showed off what could be done with the new features back in PowerPoint 2010. And as you can see below, their presentation translates to video, as well.

Create Videos in PowerPoint: Slide or Slideshow?

While the example above was an entire slideshow that included some cool animations and effective transitions, you don’t need to create whole presentations. You can publish single slides, too.

And the slide doesn’t need to be normal slide content. It could be a single video. And that video can be formatted using the PowerPoint features.

That means you can insert video into a PowerPoint slide, make some simple edits, and then output that slide as a video. Pretty slick when you think about the possibilities.

And that’s the trick I want to share.

Customize Framed Videos in PowerPoint

Why do videos need to be rectangular? Why can’t they have frames or display as shapes? That’s all possible in PowerPoint.

Here are the basic steps to create framed videos in PowerPoint.

  • Insert a video on the slide.
  • Add whatever effect you want for the video.
  • Size the video to fit the slide.
  • Save the video as MP4.

Here’s a demo of some of the videos in a Rise.

Click here to view Rise demo.

As you can see, there are some neat things you can do, especially considering that you are doing all of this in PowerPoint and not required to use a more sophisticated video application.

Now it’s your turn.


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Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

 

Interactive Video Captivate 2019 Already a Gamechanger

Adobe Captivate 2019 is a game changer for those of us who do a lot of video in our elearning courses. I have been using video extensively since 2011 for role play, content presentation and questions based on video content presented.

The simplified interactive video work flow using overlay slides and bookmarks, gives you the ability to enhance the video presented with additional content and question slides.

With the new approach to interactive video in Captivate 2019, how I work with video has changed dramatically.

Here’s how it used to work.

The original video workflow was to add object video and rely on the learner to use the video controls to start and stop the video content. There really was no way to stop video playback to introduce additional slide content or question slides. This was generally done after the video was viewed.

The workflow changed with slide video and the edit video timing tool. You could place a video on a slide and use the edit video timing tool to break the video content into clips on different slides. You could then add content slides and questions slides in between the video segment slides. On failure last attempt in question slides you could send the learner back to video segment slides for remediation using jump to slide or go back to a frame on a given slide with advanced actions. This was time consuming and required extensive knowledge of advanced actions and micro navigation based on frame count. And the actual video play back suffered because of the load time on each slide, with the loading spinner, breaking the continuity of the presentation.

Now with Captivate 2019.

The new work flow for interactive video in Captivate 2019 changes all that by placing a video on a single slide.
Using overlay markers along the slide timeline / video to display pop up content and question slides on top of the paused video. You can change the opacity of the slide to create an interesting visual effect. Remediation is much easier by using the failure – last attempt in a question slide to jump to a labelled bookmark on the slide / video timeline (reminds me of the frame label concept in Animate / Flash.)

The benefit to the learner — a much cleaner user experience and fluid presentation of the video with pop up content slides adding additional information and questions to engage the learner on the content presented.

If you have already tried interactive video, you may be getting the positive feedback that I have received with a new course just developed. This feature has had immediate impact on course presentation.

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Coaching first training Captivate 2019

Intro

Captivate 2019 (version 11) was released on the 22nd of August. I had agreed to coach a personalised training 27-28 of August, which was planned for CP2017. I got an urgent call: would it be possible to switch to CP2019? Since I like challenges, I accepted.  In this post I will talk about this experience, my view as trainer on this new version. Beware: do not consider this to be a full Review, that will be posted later. I didn’t coach about all the new features as you’ll read.

Personalised training?

Why do I label this training as ‘personalized’?  The client had asked for very specific topics, not for a standardised basic training, because the trainees would start with a very specific project. They needed to learn about quizzes, responsive projects with fluid boxes, branching, themes. I explained that is was also necessary before any other topic to understand the functionality of Captivate’s timeline because that is the real foundation of all functionality. I agreed to add 360 images with hotspots workflow. Due to the limited duration of the training (two days) I would demo interactive video, but not train about its workflow.

It was a small group of trainees, but with very different background. First example: one trainee had been working as freelance developer with Captivate 2017, but had never a real training and only created non-responsive projects.  Another trainee never used Captivate, but had an IT degree, well versed in programming languages and user of Premiere Pro. Another challenge: all trainees needed to be engaged in the training! From their end feedback (orally) this has been a success. I don’t remember everything, but was particularly impressed by one sentence ‘I learned so much in so little time.M oreover you really empowered me. I arrived, believing that Captivate was a simple application to create small videos but it is so much more !’

Captivate 2019 features

Fluid Boxes

It is much easier for a trainer to explain the idea of fluid boxes in this new version. The hierarchy is made very clear, in the properties panel (once a FB has been selected) and by the indicators in the top left corner of each fluid box/object.

Those indicators also show visually the flow of the fluid box, whether it is the selected one (center fluid box in the screenshot) or hovering over a fluid box (green indicator for bottom fluid box).

We did explore the fluid boxes in the default quizzing master slides. Since themes were a requested topic, we created a couple of content master slides. I showed not only the use of the new Position properties for sizing the fluid boxes, but also my (still favourite) workflow for using guides. It is a personal choice. One of the content master slides was used for a Drag&Drop question.

Due to lack of time, I didn’t use the CSV import, but the older GIFT import for the creation of the quiz slides. GIFT has the advantage of allowing to enter partial scoring, couldn’t find it in the CSV import (may have missed it?).

360 Slide

We created a 360 image, and added hotspots, trying out all the possible assets: text, image, audio and question slide. The workflow is so easy that the trainees didn’t really need training. I love it when trainees ask: can we find out ourselves, for any feature!  Here a static screenshot showing a hotspot with a question:

I explained how it is possible to edit the image in Photoshop CC, maybe to correct some exposure flaws.

Interactive video

As explained before I didn’t train, only showed an example of interactive video. Beware: this is really my favourite new feature, be sure you’ll see interactive videos posted here in a near future. It just didn’t fit in this training of two days.

The post Coaching first training Captivate 2019 appeared first on eLearning.

Adobe Captivate (2019 release) and Smart video recording – Webcam + Screen

Create studio-quality HD videos as you simultaneously record your webcam and on-screen content with just a few clicks. Adjust the talking-head video position and add persona to your training content. Easily edit the videos in Adobe Captivate and add interactivity to multi-screen video-based learning.

Steps:

In the Automatic chroma key effects page, we looked at how webcam video may be recorded, and the background removed. In this section we’ll build on that process. Once you have elected whether or not to include the webcam background removal, you are ready to begin recording both webcam and screen capture at the same time. Captivate will record everything on your computer in full motion, high definition video.

  1. Begin recording: Once you are satisfied, click the Record button to begin recording.
  2. Upon completion of the video, Captivate will display a preview of the video including both the screen you captured and the web cam video with a transparent background.
  3. You can publish directly to YouTube from the preview, or you can click the Edit button to make specific changes to the screen capture and web cam capture in Adobe Captivate.
  4. You can alter the scale of the videos, add images, text and animation and even add transitions.
  5. Try clicking and dragging on the webcam video to scale it larger, adjust it to fit the needs of your project.
  6. To publish the project, go to the Toolbar and click Publish > Publish to Computer.
  7. A dialog will appear on screen to help you configure the video publication.
  8. Most of the time you won’t need to do anything other than click the Publish You can use this dialog to name your file, and to select a destination location. You can also adjust the size of the video that you produce.
  9. The profile and encoding settings have been preselected to give you the best results, if you are trying to reduce file sizes or tackle complex bandwidth problems, those settings can be adjusted here. You may also adjust the frames per second and key frame interval.

The post Adobe Captivate (2019 release) and Smart video recording – Webcam + Screen appeared first on eLearning.

Engaging the Long Distance Learner: Part 1

I recently did a webinar called, “15 Ways to Market Your Training Program & Learning Tech.”  (Here is the recording and slide deck.) The session covers a lot in 60 minutes so I thought it would be good to do a complementary blog series.  The first few posts will focus on engaging the long distance learner.

Most organizations these days have at least some employees working remotely.  There are many benefits to working outside of the office, but it definitely adds a layer of complexity for those of us who teach.  Long distance employees have less of an opportunity to engage with colleagues and learn informally.  There are less chances for casual conversation that builds social bonds.  This can cause remote employees to feel they have no connection to their organization, and we know where that goes.  Less motivation, more attrition, and from an L&D standpoint, less engagement.  Why develop your job skills if you don’t know how long you’ll stay with your employer?

Learning and development can solve two issues experienced by the long distance learner.  We can deliver training and hopefully provide alternative ways to learn what informal learning normally provides.  We also support the overall culture of an organization and can give learners the opportunity to know their colleagues.

The trickiest part of teaching long distance learners is finding a way to communicate that is just as natural and meaningful as face to face interaction.  For a population that frequently feels cut off from their colleagues, videoconferencing is an important tool.  Whenever possible, teach virtual classes with your camera turned on.

Consider though that if you are teaching to a global audience, some audience members will encounter difficulty with bandwidth limitations if you leave your webcam on.  Try enabling it for your introduction or for short periods throughout the class.  If there is a registration page for the session, maybe place a photo of yourself there.  It makes it easier for us to hold onto information if we feel a sense of connection to the speaker.  (Personally… if I don’t know what the speaker looks like, I start imagining what they look like… so be prepared for me to imagine you wearing an outfit straight out of The Hunger Games.)

Character from the movie The Hunger Games

Pretty sure this is how you look…

What’s even better than one person on camera?  Everyone on camera.  I’ve frequently held team meetings with nine or more remote employees, and everyone had their webcam turned on, Hollywood Squares style.  When everyone is on video, it’s much easier to tell who is talking, or who wants to talk, or who really doesn’t like something but isn’t about to say anything.

Picture from the television show The Hollywood Squares

Team meetings just got way more fun.

It’s also a lot easier to get everyone to speak one at a time.  People can raise their hands.  When there’s too much chaos, I do interpretive dance until everyone is quiet with admiration of my dancing abilities.  (Or at least I think that’s what it is.)  Works just as well in small classes as it does in meetings.  People are much more likely to stay engaged when you can see them.  And there’s something kind of nice about slurping some noodles in LA while your colleague in New York munches on a sandwich.

Also fun… team meetings or classes where everyone wears an interesting accessory.  Show and tell.  One of my calculus professors made all of us wear party hats to exams – which he called Celebrations of Learning.  I hated calculus but the exams were definitely less painful thanks to his creativity.  You could interoffice everyone a party hat and some candy to celebrate a special occasion.

Back when I was on a Staff Diversity Committee, I tried to get my team to wear items to our virtual meeting that expressed their heritage.  Granted, it didn’t totally work… it was just me with my American Indian feathers and one team member in a Polish babushka.  But it was still an entertaining way to open our meeting.

A grandmother wearing a babushka

When you don’t want to do your hair, just wear your babushka.

Speaking of interesting ways to open a meeting, trying opening by having a different person each week teach the group something work related.  Just a five minute snippet of information before you start the agenda.  Again, this works in meetings or in cohort-style classes that meet on a recurring basis.  It helps the group get to know one another, and gives learners the chance to actively engage.

More musings coming soon.

– Katrina

The post Engaging the Long Distance Learner: Part 1 appeared first on eLearning.

Engaging the Long Distance Learner: Part 1

I recently did a webinar called, “15 Ways to Market Your Training Program & Learning Tech.”  (Here is the recording and slide deck.) The session covers a lot in 60 minutes so I thought it would be good to do a complementary blog series.  The first few posts will focus on engaging the long distance learner.

Most organizations these days have at least some employees working remotely.  There are many benefits to working outside of the office, but it definitely adds a layer of complexity for those of us who teach.  Long distance employees have less of an opportunity to engage with colleagues and learn informally.  There are less chances for casual conversation that builds social bonds.  This can cause remote employees to feel they have no connection to their organization, and we know where that goes.  Less motivation, more attrition, and from an L&D standpoint, less engagement.  Why develop your job skills if you don’t know how long you’ll stay with your employer?

Learning and development can solve two issues experienced by the long distance learner.  We can deliver training and hopefully provide alternative ways to learn what informal learning normally provides.  We also support the overall culture of an organization and can give learners the opportunity to know their colleagues.

The trickiest part of teaching long distance learners is finding a way to communicate that is just as natural and meaningful as face to face interaction.  For a population that frequently feels cut off from their colleagues, videoconferencing is an important tool.  Whenever possible, teach virtual classes with your camera turned on.

Consider though that if you are teaching to a global audience, some audience members will encounter difficulty with bandwidth limitations if you leave your webcam on.  Try enabling it for your introduction or for short periods throughout the class.  If there is a registration page for the session, maybe place a photo of yourself there.  It makes it easier for us to hold onto information if we feel a sense of connection to the speaker.  (Personally… if I don’t know what the speaker looks like, I start imagining what they look like… so be prepared for me to imagine you wearing an outfit straight out of The Hunger Games.)

Character from the movie The Hunger Games

Pretty sure this is how you look…

What’s even better than one person on camera?  Everyone on camera.  I’ve frequently held team meetings with nine or more remote employees, and everyone had their webcam turned on, Hollywood Squares style.  When everyone is on video, it’s much easier to tell who is talking, or who wants to talk, or who really doesn’t like something but isn’t about to say anything.

Picture from the television show The Hollywood Squares

Team meetings just got way more fun.

It’s also a lot easier to get everyone to speak one at a time.  People can raise their hands.  When there’s too much chaos, I do interpretive dance until everyone is quiet with admiration of my dancing abilities.  (Or at least I think that’s what it is.)  Works just as well in small classes as it does in meetings.  People are much more likely to stay engaged when you can see them.  And there’s something kind of nice about slurping some noodles in LA while your colleague in New York munches on a sandwich.

Also fun… team meetings or classes where everyone wears an interesting accessory.  Show and tell.  One of my calculus professors made all of us wear party hats to exams – which he called Celebrations of Learning.  I hated calculus but the exams were definitely less painful thanks to his creativity.  You could interoffice everyone a party hat and some candy to celebrate a special occasion.

Back when I was on a Staff Diversity Committee, I tried to get my team to wear items to our virtual meeting that expressed their heritage.  Granted, it didn’t totally work… it was just me with my American Indian feathers and one team member in a Polish babushka.  But it was still an entertaining way to open our meeting.

A grandmother wearing a babushka

When you don’t want to do your hair, just wear your babushka.

Speaking of interesting ways to open a meeting, trying opening by having a different person each week teach the group something work related.  Just a five minute snippet of information before you start the agenda.  Again, this works in meetings or in cohort-style classes that meet on a recurring basis.  It helps the group get to know one another, and gives learners the chance to actively engage.

More musings coming soon.

– Katrina

The post Engaging the Long Distance Learner: Part 1 appeared first on eLearning.

Videofeedback in der Lehre – Ilka Nagel im Videointerview

Ich habe gerade noch ein paar Hausarbeiten Studierender vor mir liegen, und vielleicht probiere ich es einmal aus. Es braucht sicher einige Vorüberlegungen, denn die Kommentierung und Bewertung von Dokumenten verläuft ja in der Regel nicht linear: Man wirft einen Blick auf das Inhaltsverzeichnis, springt zur Literatur am Ende der Arbeit, startet mit dem ersten Kapitel, blättert irgendwann zurück, wenn man Wiederholungen oder Brüche vermutet oder Fragen hat, die ein früheres Kapitel betreffen. Oder man unterbricht die Lektüre mehrmals. Ilka Nagel von der Østfold University (Norwegen) ist jedenfalls von den Vorteilen des Videofeedbacks überzeugt. Alles nur eine Frage der Routine, meint sie. „Feedback Out Loud“.
Florian Hanke und Till Rückwart, Interview mit Ilka Nagel, Hochschulforum Digitalisierung, 8. August 2018

Bildquelle: Hochschulforum Digitalisierung