How To Use eLearning For Educational Video Marketing On Social Media

Video marketing on social media is one of the most excellent means of reaching out to your ‎target audience and educating them about your niche. Integrating eLearning methods into ‎your video marketing strategies can greatly help you establish an online brand identity.‎

This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Old Tweets (04) / #100DaysToOffload

That moment when you get a notification on Twitter about the activity on your tweets, and then you realise that you’ve just had a RT or a like from an old tweet. Like, a really old tweet!

From 2018. Or from 2013!!

How does it make you feel?

Remember this … your twitter history is still available and can still be useful, to you or someone else. Or damaging, depending on your use of Twitter!! ;-)

Book Review: Social Media in Higher Education

I was aware of Chris Rowell’s call to action over a year ago, asking for interest in contributions to an idea he had, an academic text highlighting the benefits, techniques, results, and possible pitfalls on using ‘social media’ as part of online or classroom-based instruction.

At the time I didn’t have the time to submit a contribution myself, although the will was definitely there, I was active in sharing Chris’s progress as he worked with the contributors and navigating the world of self-publishing. I am really happy to say Chris has completed the project and has just sent me a copy as a ‘thank you’ and for a review.

“How does social media affect working life in Higher Education? The diverse and expert contributors analyse the many ways social media can be used to enhance teaching and learning, research, professional practice, leadership, networking and career development. The impact of social media is evaluated critically, with an eye both to the benefits and the problems of using these new forms of digital communication.” Chris Rowell

From the start of the book you feel right at home and comfortable. Chris has opened the book with a great narrative and explanation on why this book, and why now. Despite the changing nature of social media and the global setting of how it is and can be used (since publication, a global pandemic has forced many facets of education into a fully-online delivery) the chapters and themes they are categorised in work well and support each other.

Some of the contributory authors I’m familiar with, some I know well and have had the honour of working with. Some of the contributory authors are new to me and have given me a new insight into aspects of HE and SoMe, how these platforms can (and should?) be used together to successfully integrate the digital and networked student (‘always on‘) into the modern, digital and socially-connected university.

Split into six broad themes, Chris has laid the chapters out to maximise the ability of the reader to use this for reference, dipping in for what you need and have more besides when you want it. From themes of leadership to innovation or building networks, from professional practice to teaching & learning and reflections on a personal journey, the chapters are written for the casual reader (blogger) and the more advanced researcher.

One further key theme of the book is using and incorporating the student voice/body as a co-creator and collaborator in their learning. Let’s also not forget that staff and colleagues can be the ‘student’ in some of these cases, that those we work with are also learning, from learning about new techniques or tools, or new approaches to how we use the existing tools. We’ve allowed social media to ingratiate themselves in many areas of our lives, for some including them as part of their work is a new and possibly uncomfortable experience.

I can’t begin to pretend I’ve read the whole book in the short time since I received it, but I have dipped into the topics and areas of social media that interest me most at the moment. There is much more here than one can digest in just one reading, this is one of those books that you’ll keep coming back to – it will stand the test of time (until the 2nd edition!) and can be enhanced as our understanding of the benefits of social media in higher education grows, as with the growth of platforms and their accessibility (and trustworthiness?) for student-faculty interaction.

Social Media and Higher Education is essential reading for any professional working in higher education, including lecturers teaching education courses. It is also significant for researchers looking at more recent developments in the field and what it means to work in a modern higher education environment.” Chris Rowell

And finally, the plug … get your copy here: ‘Social Media in Higher Education: Case Studies, Reflections and Analysis‘ (OpenBook Publishers) – all formats considered and available, incl. paperback, hardback, eBook, PUB, PDF, MOBI, XML.

Image source: David Hopkins (CC BY-NC 4.0)

How To Use Social Media For Successful Learning And Development

The modern workforce in any organization today mostly consists of individuals who have been using social media for at least a decade or so, and as a result, their daily habits, communication style, as well as interests have been affected by it.

This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

How To Use Social Media For Successful Learning And Development

The modern workforce in any organization today mostly consists of individuals who have been using social media for at least a decade or so, and as a result, their daily habits, communication style, as well as interests have been affected by it.

This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

How To Use Social Media For Successful Learning And Development

The modern workforce in any organization today mostly consists of individuals who have been using social media for at least a decade or so, and as a result, their daily habits, communication style, as well as interests have been affected by it.

This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Digital Marketing Strategies For eLearning Service Providers

Any industry or corporate cannot survive without a meticulously designed marketing strategy. eLearning companies are no different when it comes to marketing.

This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Jane’s Personal Top 10 Tools for Learning in 2020

Ich glaube, Jane Hart’s jährliche Zusammenstellung der „Top Tools for Learning“ muss ich an dieser Stelle nicht mehr vorstellen. Jedenfalls läuft der Countdown: Bis zum 21. August kann man sich noch beteiligen und abstimmen. Jane Hart selbst geht mit gutem Beispiel voran und stellt ihre aktuellen Favoriten vor: 1. Twitter, 2. Tweetdeck, 3. Feedly, 4. Google Alerts, 5. WordPress, 6. Yammer, 7. WhatsApp, 8. Word, 9. PowerPoint, 10. Excel.

Meine persönlichen Top Ten sind da sehr nah dran: Ich würde noch Zoom, LinkedIn und Diigo hinzufügen und dafür Yammer, Word und Excel streichen. Und ob es beide, Twitter und Tweetdeck, auf einer Liste braucht? Dann wäre noch ein Platz frei, und hier konkurrieren bei mir Telegram, Slack und der Newsletter (als Kategorie).

Ansonsten bin ich gespannt, wie sich Corona dieses Jahr in den Rückmeldungen widerspiegelt. Ich bin sicher, dass sich Webinar-Tools, allen voran Zoom, weit oben in den Top Ten befinden werden. Genauso MS Teams. Am 1. September werden wir es erfahren.
Jane Hart, Modern Workplace Learning 2020 [Magazine], 11. August 2020

Bildquelle: geralt (pixabay)