CSV import – localisation

Intro

Some time before the release of CP2017 I published a blog post, where I explained how I use the GIFT import for localising projects. Time to check if a similar solution is possible with the new CSV import. I used the provided template file, an Excel spreadsheet with macros. ‘CSVQuestionsCreationMacro.xlsm’. You find this worksheet in the GalleryQuiz. That may be a problem for users who don’t have administrator rights, because the installation folder is not always accessible for them. That is one of the reasons that a lot of folders are duplicated in the Public documents (Windows) or Shared documents.

Example movie

You can watch this movie, which I’ll also be using to explain the Branch aware functionality in a future post. After the title slide, you have a choice slide: you can opt to take the quiz in one of three languages. Or, if you are trilingual, why not choose the option ‘ALL’?

Play

Workflow CSV import

English questions

I used the provided Excel worksheet to create these questions. I first double checked the Quiz Preferences for the Default labels, and the master slides. I took out the option to show the Progress. Reason: contrary to all other labels, when you change the Preferences to have another language, the labeling of the Progress will not remain on the existing slides. That is an annoying small bug. The progress text will always be converted to the last used language.

After importing the questions some manual work has to be done, because not everything can be set up in the CSV file:

  • The positive score for each question is imported, but if you want a penalty, you will have to add it manually. Refer to the Advanced Interaction panel shown below
  • For the MCQ slide with multiple correct answers, you need to set up the individual scores manually for each of the answers. With GIFT import it is possible to insert already the positive partial scores, not with CSV for what I detected.

It is very easy to set up the Matching slides, the Help documentation is not updated: you do not have to insert the pipe sympbol, there is a matching field. Nicely done!

Dutch and French questions

The third sheet of the Excel worksheet has the fields for the to be exported CSV file. However you are not allowed to edit those fields. You don’t have access to the questions as they were defined in the second sheet, so that is not a workaround.

My workflow was to use the exported CSV file with the English questions, and open it in Excel as a copy. That file can be translated to any language. You can save it as a CSV file from Excel and import in Captivate.

Before importing such a translated file, I set the Quiz Preferences to the correct language. Especially the Default labels need to be translated. For that purpose I have always a Preferences file ready that can be imported. Only newly created quiz slides will take on those new labels (also for the buttons), with the exception of the Progress mentioned above: it will also override the progress on existing quiz slides.

Conclusion

At this moment, I still have a slight preference to use GIFT files for import, especially if I need to translate questions for the same project or for other projects. Translating a GIFT file, that is already set up correctly is a quicker workflow. Being able to define partial score in that file is another plus.

In a next blog post, I will explain the ins and outs, and the setup of the Branch aware feature which has been used in the example file.

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Adobe Captivate 2019 release

Fluid Boxes – Adobe is Listening!

When Fluid Boxes were launched in Captivate 2017 Release, I was pleased with this approach to responsive design. However, I felt like some aspects needed improvement. For me, the main thing was resizing of Fluid Boxes. Resizing Fluid Boxes was done by using the blue selection handles and dragging your mouse. Even using Rulers and Guides this was a difficult task of precisely setting up Fluid Boxes of an exact size. I’m pleased to report that with Captivate 2019 you can select the Fluid Boxes to resize them to a precise number of pixels or percentage by selecting the Fluid Box and navigating over to your Position panel. From there you can type in a percentage or pixel count, and you’re done. This is useful when you have a Fluid Box that serves the same purpose on many different slides in your project. For example, a Fluid Box dedicated to slide titles or navigation controls.

Another improvement that we’ve been asking for is the ability to correct for misaligned or improperly distributed objects within a fluid box, or for that matter wrongly distributed fluid boxes within a parent fluid box. Adobe has provided a simple button to distribute these object equally. This works well when I’ve resized something by accident.

I think my favourite improvement to fluid boxes in Captivate 2019 is the ability to align Static Fluid Boxes. Regular Fluid Boxes are great when your content is side by side. However, if you need your content to overlap, or require additional state objects, you need a Static Fluid Box. As we now know, Static Fluid Boxes have to maintain their aspect ratio. This means that as you shrink from one screen size to another, the content in a Static Fluid Box always shrinks with it. In Captivate 2017 the Static Fluid Box would always remain centered within the area for that Fluid Box. It wasn’t always what I had in mind with my design. Fortunately, with Captivate 2019 you can now choose a custom alignment for Static fluid boxes. You can align the Static Fluid Box any number of ways both horizontally and vertically.

This next improvement isn’t an improvement to fluid boxes, but I sure could have used it earlier this year when designing a series of modules for a client whose target device was iPads. This organisation doesn’t use computers, but each location has several iPads for a variety of purposes including training. No problem for me because I have an iPad. There was just one problem. Every time I wanted to test a version of one of the modules, I needed to publish it for HTML5, upload the published course to my web server, email myself the URL so I could pick it up on my iPad and then launch the course. With all the iterations of each module and a total of about two dozen modules, this was time-consuming. Thankfully now I will have access to Live Preview on Devices, a new preview method in Captivate 2019 that displays a QR code on your computer screen. With a mobile device on the same Wi-Fi network as your computer, you point your camera at your screen, and the course magically launches on your device.

I know that some eLearning designer-developers downplay the importance of responsive design, but look around at some of the remote workers and see what equipment they are using. In the early 2000s when the price of laptops came down, we started seeing remote workers using laptops. For example, you might see appliance repair persons, telecom installers and various others using laptops for managing what was traditionally done with pen, paper and clipboards. I’ve been observing these workers using a variety of different tablets and in some cases even larger smartphones. I’ve also seen a restaurant using tablets for the servers to take guest orders. This tells me that responsive design will be the way we all design some day. I predict that if in 5 years time if you’re not designing responsive elearning, you will not have a competitive edge. When you look at the improvements to fluid boxes in Captivate 2019, it is clear that Adobe is preparing for that eventuality.

New Features for Experiential Learning

As you start to work with the new features in Adobe Captivate 2019, you start to see a theme with many of the features. For me, that theme is experiential learning. Of course, some of you would argue that you cannot have experiential eLearning. eLearning isn’t close enough to real life. While we may not be able to immerse learners entirely in reality, this version of Captivate takes a few big steps toward that direction.

For a few years, I’ve been listening to other Captivate developers talk about virtual reality and the dream to design 3D eLearning. That dream is now a reality with Captivate 2019. You can now create a virtual reality eLearning project that learners can view on their computer screen, mobile device and even using a VR headset. Learners can turn in all directions and view whatever environment you wish to display to them. You can make it truly interactive by adding hotspots to perform a variety of different actions. You can play additional audio, display additional images, show the learner a text passage and much more. I’m very interested in seeing how other developers use this feature. If eLearning was a video game, we’ve just gone from Donkey Kong to World of Warcraft.

VR is cool, and everything but I predict that the breakthrough feature of Adobe Captivate 2019 will be the new Interactive Video feature. An interactive video gives you the ability to design video-based learning interactions for your learners that are truly engaging and immersive.  You can insert bookmarks on the video timeline and jump to those bookmarks from anywhere in your eLearning project. You can also add overlay slides that will hover over the paused video for learners to gain additional information. You can also add question slides as overlays. You can have the outcome of the question determine where you navigate your learners to depending on how they answer. So for example, if the learner gets a question wrong you can navigate to a portion of the video where the video instructor provides remediation to the learner, or alternatively offer praise to the learner for getting the answer correct.

I’m really excited to not only see what other developers will use these features for, but I’m excited to start telling my clients about what we can now do in eLearning that we couldn’t do today. I’d love to hear what your ideas are. Feel free to put your own suggestions in the comments below and please share this article with your fellow eLearning designer-developers.

Virtual Reality Projects

In this video tutorial, I show you the new Virtual Reality Projects in Adobe Captivate 2019.

Interactive Video

In this video tutorial, I show you what I predict will be the standout feature of Adobe Captivate 2019, Interactive Video. I will show you how to add overlay slides to your videos, and interactive items like knowledge check questions. In addition, you will be able to easily add really cool remediation to your interactive videos.

YouTube Streaming

In this video tutorial, I will show you the changes in the Insert Video window in Captivate 2019. You will also learn about the new way to insert YouTube videos into your eLearning project and how to make YouTube videos interactive.

Live Preview on Devices

Before Captivate 2019, if I wanted to preview my designs on a mobile device, I had to publish the whole project, upload it to my web server, email myself a hyperlink and then launch the course from my mobile device. In this video tutorial, I show you how easy it is to do the same thing just by using a simple QR Code reader in iOS or Android devices. No web server required.

Webcam Video Demo

In this video tutorial, I show you how you can record and insert clips from your webcam into your video demo tutorials recorded in Adobe Captivate 2018 Release.

Enhanced Fluid Boxes

In this video tutorial, I show you how fluid boxes have been enhanced and improved in Adobe Captivate 2019 Release

CSV Import for Questions

In this video tutorial, I’ll show you how easy it is to import a variety of question types into your Adobe Captivate project using CSV files that you can edit or create using spreadsheet software such as Microsoft Excel or Apple Numbers.

PowerPoint in Responsive Projects

In this video tutorial, I show you the new ability to import PowerPoint slides into your Adobe Captivate 2019 responsive design project. I probably won’t use this feature, but I see the value in having this feature available to new Captivate users.

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Congratulations! – Prerelease Experience

Today the Adobe team has a well-deserved celebration day: Captivate version 2019 (11) has been released! Congratulations to all of you from your most stubborn tester.

Since 10 years I have participated in every prerelease of Captivate, my favourite eLearning tool. Lot of memories and emotions! I have seen many people from the Adobe team, come and go.   Captivate has grown  in all these years from an application mainly meant to create (good) software simulations to an all-round tool suitable for all possible eLearning assets. Look at this release: easy workflow for Interactive Video, stepping into the VR world, integration of the cool features of Video Xpress in  Video Demo, CSV import as alternative to GIFT import….

My first memory of a very warm welcome from the Adobe team in my first prelease experience, has never been deceived!  Captivate developers are very open-minded, they welcome any positive criticism which can lead to a better product or user experience. Due to my experiences with other prelease groups, I want to testify that this is outstanding! It was  and is always a great pleasure to meet some of you ‘in real life’ on Adobe events.  We both experienced the same big problem: is this name linked to a woman or to a man? You had issues with my Flemish name, I have problems with your names, but …. found a workaround 

Congratulations for CP2019, and thanks to you all!

After exploring the final release version, more in depth, will post an overview of the new features in a future blog.

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Getting Started with Adobe Captivate Prime – Uploading your Learners

You may well have heard about Adobe’s new Learning Management System (LMS) – Adobe Captivate Prime. Prime is incredibly simple to use, and it’s fun to sign up for a free trial and easy to add courses, even get started sharing your courses with learners. In a live demo of Captivate Prime this week, I […]