Learning Thursday #3: Use Virtual Reality (VR) to Try on Makeup

Learning Thursday typically focuses on L&D articles and research. But this week, I’m featuring a fun virtual reality activity to ease us into the new year.  (If you need to satisfy your academic reading fix, the last Learning Thursday is here.)

Virtual reality (VR) has been a hot topic in many industries. As you may know, the makeup industry is beginning to use VR to sell products. Maybelline is a prime example. Check out their Virtual Try On tool, which shows you how different products will look on your face. The tool allows you to upload a photo of yourself, take a photo using your device camera, or try out looks on a model.

If you want to know what you’re getting into before you try the tool, here is what it did with a photo of me.

The first photo is me with minimal makeup:

And this is me after using Maybelline’s tool to apply eyeliner, eyeshadow, blush, and lipstick:

Not my usual style, but it’s pretty realistic!  A few questions for discussion…

  1. Do you think this tool would motivate you (or someone you know who wears makeup) to purchase more products?
  2. Is it less intimidating to try out looks like this, versus in a store?
  3. Is it less realistic to try out looks like this, versus in a store?

If virtual reality is interesting to you, check out Adobe Captivate 2019, which helps you build immersive VR learning experiences.

The post Learning Thursday #3: Use Virtual Reality (VR) to Try on Makeup appeared first on eLearning.

Long road to ruin

I’ve borrowed the title for this post from Messers Grohl, Mendel, Smear, Hawkins and Shiflett … more commonly known as Foo Fighters.

Why? Well, over the 2018 festive break I’ve read more than a few reflective pieces from those in my extended network about the direction and increasingly intrusive nature of technology in our lives, and this song title leapt to mind. The ‘long road to ruin’ here is how we are ‘letting’ tech companies access and control our lives.

This control may not be actual control, however the trend for app-enabled and ‘smart’ devices like watches, fitness trackers, toothbrushes, weighing scales, light bulbs, door locks, etc. certainly is trending towards this. Whilst we are paying for the devices, sometimes with contactless payment, we are handing over the data of what we do with these devices (personal, location, health, etc.) to an organisation we know nothing about. Nor do we know what they’ll do with that data. Or who they’ll share/sell it to?

From the data we create and hand over one of these purchased devices to the data we create on free services like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, etc, we have the illusion that we are in control, using features such as how private we keep our account, opting in or out of different settings, yet we don’t have the control we think we have. Amazon is using our browsing and purchasing habits to tailor itself to what it’s algorithms think we’ll want next. Not to mention what we ask Alexa or what we watch or listen to through your Prime membership. Whilst you can link accounts between these services, and the cross-analytics you generate there, you think you’re being clever by not doing it and preventing that kind of access/data control over you, it turns out it doesn’t matter anyway, these organisations are sharing your data/control anyway.

I now have too many devices in the home that have the ability to listen. With only one device actively set up to do this (Amazon Echo) the others all have microphones that could, if hacked or otherwise taken control of, listen without me wanting or knowing it. I hear you cry ‘if you’re that paranoid, don’t have them!’ which I’ll agree with, but I’m also a sucker for making my life easier, or access to information or family or news or games or a good deal on Lego easier. I have chosen to enable these devices and have chosen to bring them into my life. But what they do, that’s the device itself and the organisation that ends up collecting the data I create, with that data still troubles me.

Apart from these devices that collect data on what I do, where I do it, who I’m with, there are also devices and organisations that know more about me than probably I do. Devices with fingerprint or facial recognition. Companies that use voice recognition or voice-stress analysis in an attempt to root out hacking in an attempt to keep us safe, even from ourselves.

So, why a ‘long road to ruin’? Unless we have a full and very frank understanding of this data we create and precisely what is being done with it, by and with whom, then I believe we are all in for a very hard lesson to learn when it comes to light exactly what we’ve allowed to happen in the name of simplifying our lives – “we are entering the post-privacy age.”

Image source: Alan Levine (CC BY 2.0)

Gamification and Virtual Reality Being a Trend Setter in eLearning

When you feel like nothing is important more than learning, then you can think out of the box and add new dimensions to your ideas. In this context, Gamification has evolved by bringing online learning as a game to immerse the learners in life-like scenarios by virtual walkthroughs smearing virtual reality with it. Virtual reality…

Adobe Captivate 2019 Virtual Reality Project – A Developer’s Review

Adobe Captivate is one of the leading authoring tools to develop rapid e-learning courses with its unique features. In its recent update, Adobe Captivate 2019, it has created an exceptional achievement in its arena. In this blog, we are going to review Virtual Reality feature in Adobe Captivate 2019. Virtual Reality in Adobe Captivate 2019…

What is VR, AR and 360° Video? What Makes Differ From One Another?

Gone were the days, where learner used to sit in a closed room with a book in his/ her hand and an instructor with the teaching aids. Over the last two decades, the change in the technology is unpredictable. A radical behavior in the minds of the learners paved a way to discover the new…

What is VR, AR and 360° Video? What Makes Differ From One Another?

Gone were the days, where learner used to sit in a closed room with a book in his/ her hand and an instructor with the teaching aids. Over the last two decades, the change in the technology is unpredictable. A radical behavior in the minds of the learners paved a way to discover the new…

Themenschwerpunkt: Virtual Reality und Augmented Reality in der Bildung

Vielleicht ist „Themenschwerpunkt“ zu hoch gegriffen: Drei kurze Artikel versuchen, etwas Ordnung in die Diskussion um Virtual und Augmented Reality zu bringen. Einer widmet sich ganz dem Stichwort „Augmented“. Hier heißt es:

„Lehrende aller Bildungsstufen sollten sich also überlegen, wie AR didaktisch sinnvoll zu neuen Lehr- und Lernarrangements führen kann. Moser und Zumbach (2012) schlagen vor, AR für exploratives und problemorientiertes Lernen einzusetzen. Lernenden werden dabei zu Akteurinnen und Akteuren der vorbereiteten Lernumgebung und können mit den AR-Elementen interagieren. … Wird Lernen mit AR weitAR gedacht, sollten Lernenden in den Herstellungsprozess von AR-Elementen eingebunden werden.“

Mit zahlreichen Literaturhinweisen und Links.
FNMA Magazin, 03/2018 (pdf)

Trivantis’ CenarioVR: 360 Degree Virtual Walkthrough eLearning Courses

Virtual Reality will be the next biggest thing in the arena of eLearning. Organizations are gearing up to catch the current trend to create innovative and immersive eLearning courses. Well, there are many eLearning authoring tools and software applications to develop 360 degree virtual tours. But our recent observations in creating virtual reality courses shown…

Immersive Learning News

Torsten Fell tourt derzeit durch die Lande. Auch für die Zukunft Personal hatten wir ihn ja mit einem Beitrag über Virtual Reality gewinnen können (den er gleich zum Anlass nahm, um auf die Diskrepanz zwischen den Werbebotschaften der Messe und den dortigen Angeboten zum Thema VR/AR hinzuweisen). Jetzt hat er noch ein „kuratiertes Online Magazine für Immersive Learning“ ins Leben gerufen. Wer sich also für die Themen Virtual/ Augmented/ Mixed Reality interessiert, findet hier eine neue Anlaufstelle.
Torsten Fell, September 2018