10 Essential Elements Of Effective eCommerce Website Design

Companies are making sure that they give high-quality eCommerce website solutions to their customers. They are focusing on making eCommerce engaging, giving it a more user-friendly interface, and offering regular feedback. This article is all about those elements which can help you bring in more sales. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Here’s How I Built This 3D Pop-Out in PowerPoint

PowerPoint graphics

In a recent post, I showed how I use PowerPoint to build the graphics for my Rise courses. I had a few questions on how to create the person sticking out of the circle image (apparently that is popular).  So today’s post shows how to do this. It’s pretty easy.

How to Create a 3D Pop-Out Graphic in PowerPoint

PowerPoint graphics Content Library

  • Insert a character and crop it until it is square.
  • Insert a circle.
  • The circle and image should be a similar size.
  • Crop the image to a circle shape.
  • Position the character over the circle.
  • Scale it up to suit your need for the overhanging image.
  • Duplicate the character.
  • Crop the first image to fit in the circle.
  • Crop the second image and place on top of the first image to cover.
  • Group together so you don’t accidentally nudge them out of place.

PowerPoint graphic steps

As you can see, it’s relatively simple to do. Then whatever you build in PowerPoint can be saved as an image. Either right-click it and save as .PNG or save the slide itself as .PNG.

Watch the tutorial below to get more of the specific detail. And here’s a bonus tutorial on how I created the 3D pop-out header image above.

Click here to view the YouTube tutorial.


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Publishing Your Online Course, Part 2: How To Make Your eCourses Attractive And Sound

Publishing your online school just for the sake of doing so won’t work. If you want to be more effective, you will need to pay attention to its visual appearance and how attractive can you make it so that it looks as professional as possible. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

A Simple Way to Build PowerPoint Graphics for Mobile Learning

PowerPoint graphics

In a previous post, I shared how I built an interactive scenario in Rise. I’ve gotten lots of emails asking how I built the graphics like the headers and the flashcard interactions for the interactive scenario. So in today’s post, I’m going to show you a simple way to build graphics for your Rise e-learning courses.

PowerPoint graphics headers for Rise blocks

PowerPoint graphics flashcard interaction

Understanding the Image Blocks in Rise

Rise offers a number of blocks that support inserted images (such as image, gallery, and some of the interactions). Most them work perfectly in one of two aspect ratios:

  • 1:1 (square)
  • 16:9 (rectangle)

There are a few blocks that have text overlay where the image is scaled. Those are mostly decorative images so we won’t worry about them.

Understanding PowerPoint Slides

PowerPoint is easy-to-use screen and with some practice, you can build almost any type of visual. Because of this, I build my simple graphics in PowerPoint and save the slides as images.

In PowerPoint, we need to do two things: set slide size and then whatever we build we export as an image.

  • Go to Design>Slide Size and modify the slide size.
  • To save the slide as an image, go to Save As and choose an image format. You can save a single slide or all slides. I usually save in PNG format.

Create PowerPoint Graphics to Use in Rise

Since there are two aspect ratios, I create two PowerPoint files for my Rise graphics. One is 1:1 and the other is 16:9. You can see the PowerPoint files I created for the scenario demo.

PowerPoint graphics example of file

PowerPoint is a freeform slide. I can build virtually anything I need quickly. In the interactive scenario, I created 1:1 images for the flashcards. One side of the flashcard has the question text and the other has the feedback.

I used the various image editing features in PowerPoint to colorize the graphics. I also used the emjoi features to create some simple feedback graphics. While it’s easy enough to build these graphics with other tools I just find PowerPoint to be easy and fast. However you’re not confined to PowerPoint, you can use the tool of your choice.

PowerPoint graphics flashcard questions

PowerPoint graphics flashcard answers

The images above are relatively simple. The images below required a bit more work. I had to build it so the character extends out of the frame. You can see that I created a couple of versions. I opted for the lighter version because it made the Rise screen seem more open with more white space.

PowerPoint graphics header image

When you’re all done building your slides, save the slides as images rather than a .pptx file. Then you’ll have a folder of images that work with your Rise courses.

Bonus PowerPoint Graphics Tip

With Articulate 360, you get Studio 360 that includes Presenter and works with PowerPoint. That means you have access to all of the Content Library characters and templates. So if you want the same Content Library characters in Rise, use PowerPoint slides to build the graphics like I did above.

Here’s another example I mocked up for the blog post using the same techniques.

PowerPoint graphics interactive scenario 2

So there you have it. In the first, post we looked at how to build the interactive scenario in Rise. And in this one, we reviewed how to use PowerPoint to quickly build the graphics you need.


Download the fully revised, free 63-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

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2018
 

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

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5 Ways to Use PowerPoint as an Image Editor

Use PowerPoint to edit images

Over the years, I’ve posted hundreds of tutorials using PowerPoint. Some of them to be updated. Today I am going to cover five ways to use PowerPoint as an image editor. This is great for quick image editing or for those who don’t have other image editors on hand.

Save PowerPoint Content as an Image

Since we’re talking about PowerPoint as an image editor, the first tip is that whatever you create in PowerPoint can be saved as an image.

I usually group the objects so it’s one group. And then I right-click and save as picture. I like to save as a .PNG so that the transparent areas of the image are still transparent. If you save as .JPEG, the transparent areas will become white.

In the image below, I used PowerPoint to create the sandwich stack and then right-clicked to save as picture.

PowerPoint as illustrator

Create Custom-Sized PowerPoint Slides

You can make a PowerPoint slide any size you want. By default, they’re 16:9. That and 4:3 are the most common aspect ratios. However, by going to the Design Tab you can set the slides to any size. That means they can be tall and skinny or short and wide.

PowerPoint as illustrator slide size

Why would someone want to do that? Check out the tip below.

Export PowerPoint Slides as Images

PowerPoint slides can be saved as images. That means you can add whatever you want to a slide, layer content, etc and then save that slide as an image. I do this quite a bit when I need to quickly build graphics for my e-learning courses.

For example, the flashcard interaction in Rise is a 1:1 aspect ratio. So I make a PowerPoint slide that is 1:1 and add my content to the slide. It’s a great way to add titles and images to the flashcards to make them visually richer.

Once I’ve completed the slide, I save the PowerPoint slides as images and insert them into the Rise interaction.

PowerPoint as illustrator

The images above were all created in PowerPoint as slides and inserted into the Rise course. You can see an example of the PowerPoint slide images in this demo course.

Using PowerPoint slides to create images is easy and it gives me more control over the images I use in my e-learning courses.

How to Extend a Photo’s Background

Sometimes you have images where the object is centered which makes it challenging to place other content on the screen. An easy way to fix this is to cut a slice from the image and stretch it. This lets you move the main object over and get some empty space for text or other content.

PowerPoint as illustrator to extend images

I also use this technique to quickly build slide layouts which I showed in this previous blog post on how to create a template from a single image.

Create PowerPoint or e-learning template from image

How to Remove the Backgrounds of Images in PowerPoint

Since PowerPoint 2010, you can use PowerPoint to remove backgrounds from your images. For the most part, it works well. Select your image and the remove background. You can select areas to keep and areas to remove. Once you’ve removed the background, you can play around with softening the edges to get rid of any obvious jaggedness.

How to remove background in PowerPoint

As you can see, PowerPoint is a great tool for building simple illustrations or using it for quick graphics editing.


Download the fully revised, free 63-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

Upcoming E-Learning Events

2018
 

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

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How to Edit SVG Graphics in PowerPoint

edit SVG in PowerPoint

The good news is that now you can edit SVG images in PowerPoint. And that’s a big deal because we’re starting to see more SVG images every day.

In fact, one of the sites where I buy images has the option to download SVG images. This is great because they can be edited and customized. However, to edit them requires knowing how to do so with an illustration program. Unless of course, you know how to use PowerPoint.

Insert & Edit SVG Image in PowerPoint

This first step is really easy. Insert a picture by using Insert>Pictures on the toolbar. Locate your SVG image and insert it. Voila! I will add, that I’ve had a few SVG files that didn’t work, but for the most part it’s been smooth sailing.

SVG PowerPoint

The next step is also very easy. What you’ll do is convert the SVG image into an object that can be edited in PowerPoint. The newest version of PowerPoint has a “Convert to Shape” feature. If you don’t see it in your version of PowerPoint, you’ll need to upgrade to the Office 365 version.

  • Select the image
  • In the format toolbar (or via right-click) select Convert to Shape. It will ask if you want to convert it.
  • Once it’s converted, you need to ungroup the image. Right-click, and select Ungroup.
  • Now the image is broken into multiple shapes where you can edit them as you wish.

convert and edit SVG in PowerPoint

Once the image is ungrouped you can edit it. For example, I removed the background content and just isolated the guy on the computer. now I can insert it anywhere I want. You can regroup the object and right-click to save as an image. I like to save as a PNG file so that the transparent part of the image remains transparent.

edit SVG in PowerPoint computer man

How to Edit SVG in PowerPoint Video Tutorial

Here’s a video tutorial where I show how to convert and edit an SVG in PowerPoint.

Click here to watch the YouTube tutorial.

As you can see, it’s super easy to edit SVG files in PowerPoint. That should open the doors to all sorts of possibilities as you find free SVG files at those various sites that offer free stock images.


Download the fully revised, free 63-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

Upcoming E-Learning Events

2018
 

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

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3 Ways to Insert Emojis Into Your E-Learning Courses

insert emoji e-learning

In a previous post, we looked at when to use emojis in e-learning courses. There some good tips and comments in the post. Emojis add clever visual cues, but it is important to use them in a way that enhances the learning experience and doesn’t confuse it. So that’s always something to keep in mind.

The next question is how does one actually find and insert emojis. Today, I’ll show you three simple ways to add emojis to your e-learning courses.

Insert Emojis Using Keyboard Shortcuts

insert emoji keyboard e-learning

In Windows, you can add emojis using the keyboard shortcut [Windows Key + .]. And with a Mac, it’s [CTRL + CMD + Space]. I’m not sure what it is for Linux, but odds are you’re just sitting in a basement not communicating with people, so it’s probably not as critical.

I find that it can be a bit of a challenge when adding emojis via the Windows keyboard because I have to first activate the emoji screen and then start typing. But if nothing comes up while I type, I have to search; and it’s easy to accidentally add text and an emoji to what you’re typing on the screen.

Insert Emojis Using the Onscreen Windows Keyboard

insert emoji onscreen keyboard e-learning

I believe the Windows shortcut above was added in a recent version of Windows 10. If it doesn’t work for you, try accessing the touch keyboard. That’s been part of Windows for a while now.You can add it to the taskbar and then just click the icon to open the onscreen keyboard.

insert emoji with keyboard

Insert Emojis Using a Browser Extension

Each browser is going to work different (and have different options) so you’ll need to learn how to do this in a browser other than Chrome which is what I use. I added the “Emoji for Google Chrome” extension to my browser. Whenever I want to insert an emoji, I just have to click on the icon and search. I then select the emoji which gets added to the holding cell and from there I just copy and paste it.

insert emoji with Chrome browser extension e-learning

One thing to keep in mind is that the emojis will look different on different devices. For example, what you see in your browser may be different than what you see on a mobile device, which will look different than what you see in your document. They’ll still be emojis, but may not be as dynamic as the ones you inserted.

insert emojis look different

Do you have a different way of inserting emojis?


Download the fully revised, free 63-page ebook: The Insider's Guide to Becoming a Rapid E-Learning Pro

Upcoming E-Learning Events

2018
 

Free E-Learning Resources

Want to learn more? Check out these articles and free resources in the community.

Here’s a great job board for elearning, instructional design, and training jobs

Participate in the weekly elearning challenges to sharpen your skills

Get your free PowerPoint templates and free graphics & stock images.

Lots of cool elearning examples to check out and find inspiration.

Getting Started? This elearning 101 series and the free e-books will help.

When to Use Emojis for E-Learning

emoji e-learning

Emojis are the today’s hieroglyphics. I can imagine thousands of years from now as archaeologists try to reconstruct our culture. They’ll spend years collecting emoji messages and then additional years to decipher them. And after all of that time, they’ll come to learn that we worshiped the goddesses known as Kardashians.

It’s a frightening thought indeed, but one we can counteract in how we use emojis in our training programs.

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