How to Upload & Publish Adobe Captivate Course on WordPress Website?

It’s been almost a week since i’m hanging out in this E-Learning Community. Following what other members are posting (Question & Blog), i found a very interesting question coming up again n again. The question is: How to Upload & Publish Adobe Captivate Course on WordPress website? To answer this question, i’m writing a proper step by step guide which is going to help you publishing your course on WordPress website.

Here are some threads:
https://elearning.adobe.com/discussion/2612869/
https://elearning.adobe.com/discussion/2212856/
https://elearning.adobe.com/discussion/967803/
https://elearning.adobe.com/discussion/1694974/

Note: It is assumed you have you exported Adobe Captivate course .zip file. I’m not going to show you how to export your files.

Requirements:

To upload your course on WordPress website, you need a Plugin. Let me tell you, there are no free plugin for this task. You have to buy any, but i’m using GrassBlade xAPI Companion WordPress plugin. The developers of this plugin are in this field from last 8 years, this is the trust factor i have with them. Support is good and it is easy to use also this plugin is way more cheaper than others.

Note: I’m not promoting it here, but according to me this the ultimate choice, if you want to do this task. Also this plugin Works with xAPI Tracking only, no SCORM.

Step 1:

Login to your WordPress dashboard.

Step 2:

Install and Activate Plugin.

Step 3:

After activation, you get 2 new option on the left sidebar. xAPI Content (Uploading and Content Management) and GrassBlade (Settings and LRS Configuration).

Step 4:

Go to xAPI Content and Click Add New.

Step 5:

Scroll Down and go to xAPI Content Details.

Step 7:

Now Select your zip file and click update button.

You’re done !! it will upload and publish your course on WordPress site. If you have a big file you can use dropbox option. Connect Dropbox with this plugin and directly import your big files. There is bulk import option also in xAPI content.

Step 8:

Click preview button in Content Detail Section, to view this course. You can use shortcode to show this course on any page. Also you can select, show this course on this page option to use that same page.

Note: If you’re uploading course with xAPI Tracking feature, you must connect this plugin with Learning Record Store (LRS). You can use their GrassBlade LRS or some other, it will work perfectly.

I hope this article will solve problem of many Adobe Captivate and WordPress users. You guys can ask question in comment section, i will try to answer you all.

Thanks for reading follow me for more latest tips and tricks, see you some other day.

The post How to Upload & Publish Adobe Captivate Course on WordPress Website? appeared first on eLearning.

Learning Interactions and Audio

Why?

A question posted recently is at the base of this short post: “a way to stop the main slide audio when a tab on the interaction is clicked”. I pointed to an older blog where you can find some tips for using learning interactions, about their limitations etc. I want to explain why there is no simple solution for this question at all. The audio referred to in the question was slide audio, the used Learning interaction was Tabs. What I explain is also valid for Accordion and Timeline. As I explained in the mentioned blog post, the term ‘Learning Interactions’ was introduced to distinguish the widgets compatible with HTML5 output from the older ‘widgets’ which were created for SWF output. Both have however the same extension ‘wdgt’ and are sometimes both indicated as widget. Terminology can be confusing

Static and Interactive

It seems logical that Learning Interactions are interactive, because they allow the learner to click and interact, and they are listed under the Interactions big button. All have some  of interactions inside. However not all are also ‘Interactive object’ in  Capativate’s timeline. A Captivate interactive object means:

  • It has an Actions tab
  • Under the Actions tab you find up to two events (Success, Last Attempt)
  • A pausing point is automatically inserted at 1.5secs.

You all know the usual interactive objects: button, shape converted to button, Text Entry Box, click box. For those objects you’ll see the pausing point immediately on the slide timeline. Moreover the object timeline, when not selected will be green. Look at this screenshot, where I kept the original generic names to clarify the type of objects.

Learning Interactions are internally interactive but as objects in Captivate they also come in two flavors: static and interactive. You can recognize them also by the presence of the Actions tab, with the possibility of scoring and reporting. However the score in the game interactions have nothing to do with the results of the game (see article link in the Intro).

Interactive interactions can also be identified, based on the generic name in the Timeline panel. In this screenshot I have inserted two interactions: Tabs (static) and Jigsaw Puzzle (interactive). Look at the generic names:

However, if you look carefully you see that both interactions also have a colored timeline, but exactly the opposite of what you expect. Please, support me by logging this bug. You may also wonder about the presence of a pausing point? No pausing point for the interactions? The static interaction has indeed no pausing point, you need to add an interactive object like a button, to keep the slide paused and allow the learner to explore that static interaction. However the Interactive Interaction has a pausing point which is not showing in the Timeline panel, but you’ll find it in the Timing properties.

Audio Problem

The question was about avoiding having slide audio still playing when the user clicks one of the buttons in the Tabs interaction. That interaction allows  to add audio to a button, which is object audio.  Only object audio allows simultaneously playing of multiple audio clips, either from object audio or, in this case, slide audio. Pausing the slide audio, when a button is clicked in the Interaction would need access to the source code of the widget, which is not available. I can only propose two possible solution to avoid hearing two audio clips at the same time.  I will only explain the first solution in this article. The second solution, with a custom interaction will be explained in a later article.

Interaction available after Slide Audio

This is the easiest workflow. The learner would not be able to use the Interaction while the slide audio is playing. With a normal interactive object that would be easy: disable it for a certain time with and On Enter action for the slide and enable after a certain time corresponding with the audio length. However, even an Interactive Interaction cannot be disabled! You need a workaround.

Steps:

  1. Create a static image of the interaction, either using Captivate or another screen capture app like Snagit. Quality should be good to excellent.
  2. Resize that image to the exact size of the Interaction.
  3. Insert the image on the Timeline and time it for the duration of the slide audio.
  4. Move the learning interaction to appear just after the image.
  5. For a static interaction (like Tabs, Accordion….) you need to insert a button or click box to pause the slide. That is not necessary for an interactive Interaction.

Have a look at this screenshot of the Timeline, which illustrates the described steps:

The timelines from bottop to top:

  • Slide audio, about 3,5secs long
  • Tabs Interaction, starts at 3,4 seconds, extends till end of the slide
  • Image of the Tabs interaction, same location and size, starts from the first frame and ends at 3,8secs; overlap with the Interaction is meant to avoid seeing the transition
  • Click box – duration of the slide –  to pause the slide at its end; it could be a Next button as well.

Custom Interaction

Using shared actions, multistate objects, it is perfectly possible to recreate this interaction on a slide. At that moment you have full control over all objects. To avoid multiple audio clips playing at once, the easiest way is to use only audio started with ‘Play Audio’ command.  If you start a second audio with that command, the first one will be stopped automatically. For this example:

  1. Use Play Audio with the On Enter event to replace the slide audio.  That is possible if you don’t need Closed Captioning.
  2. Use Play Audio in the actions triggered by the Tabs buttons. Clicking the button will automatically stop the previous audio, whether it is the audio started On Enter, or the Audio started with another Tabs button. Object audio would also be possible, if you use the command ‘Stop Triggered Audio’ to stop the first audio clip started On Enter.

Do you want to see the setup for such a custom interaction? Let me know.

The post Learning Interactions and Audio appeared first on eLearning.

Interactivity in Software Tutorials?

Intro

Whenever a comparison of eLearning authoring tools is published, Captivate still is considered to be the best tool for creation of software tutorials. That has been indeed the primary goal when Captivate was released many years ago. I have been choosing it many years ago (with version 1) for that feature as well. Too bad that most authors seem to forget that meanwhile it has become to most versatile authoring tool, and is probably more used for its other features (compliance training, scenario training to mention only a few).  It is much easier just to edit an old text than to explore all new features in depth. Sorry for my cynical attitude, had many discussions with authors over that type of articles. F

My first idea was to post this as a discussion, but in the past discussions didn’t have any success at all. Maybe a blog, explaining why I am wondering about the use of Captivate for the creation of software tutorials, explaining the three possible workflows with growing level of interactivity can lead to some feedback anyway.

Workflow 1:  Passive video with Video Demo

Creating a Video Demo leads to passive video output (mp4). The only control of the learner is using the control panel (play, pause…) , or eventually some added functionality (some provide bookmarking) by the platform it is deployed on. There are many alternatives to Captivate’s Video Demo. Presenter Video Xpress is an alternative, but I find the editor much too limited. The Video Demo editor allows a lot more, and you can also use it without webcam, which is impossible with Video Xpress. Camtasia (probably the best tool for this goal) and Snagit are also alternatives, but there are a lot more available.

Use case: perfect for quick demonstrations, which you can use to remember a workflow.

PLUS

  • It doesn’t take too much time to create, especially if you capture narration and video in one workflow and do not bother about much editing.
  • It can easily be published to a  platform like YouTube or Vimeo, reaching a wide public (for free); is also a disadvantage however because of the lack of curation which makes it difficult to find valuable videos in the ‘crowd’. As with most social media there is more ‘fake’ around than valuable stuff.
  • Integration in a website is very easy.
  • It can be used as standalone asset;  the viewer only needs a mp4 player which is available on each system.

MINUS

  • As mentioned above, how will you prove the value on platforms without curation?
  • It is a purely passive tutorial.
  • Viewers expect short videos.  For that reason, normally only one workflow will be presented without any alternatives, nor explanation of the reasons of the used steps. That makes it difficult for the learner to use it in similar but slightly different situations since there is no real ‘foundation’.

Examples

Here is a Video Demo, which will also be included as Interactive Video under Workflow 2

An old example (for versions before 9), one of my first Video Demo’s where I tried to give some in-depth explanation by intensive use of the Video Demo editor can be found on YouTube:

Simple/Standard action

Workflow 2: Interactive Video

This workflow uses the published result of a Video Demo as start for an Interactive Video. That allows you to add overlay content slides, KC slides and can also be combined in a cptx project with other content slides. I think about merging with 360 slides, real quiz slides, adding links to other assets etc. You publish to HMTL5 and have to upload the result to a webserver or LMS. It is a normal cptx project. You can use an embedded video file or refer to a published MP4 file on YouTube (and probably in next version also possible with Vimeo files). For the interactive video slides it is possible to create a menu for easy navigation. You can add branching to KC slides as remediation, either to parts of the video or to content slides outside of the video slide. Here is the link to an example file, which is created from the Video Demo file you have seen under Workflow 1:

Editing Characters with Photoshop

Use case: if you want to offer more in-depth explanation to the video tutorial, more control to the learner including KC checks with remediation.

PLUS

  • Less passive, since the learner can use bookmarks to review part of the slide, KC slides can lead to remediation etc.
  • With content overlay sides (and KC overlay slides) it is possible to offer in-depth information, possible alternatives, explanation why some steps in the video were done in that explicit way, etc
  • Since the result is the same output as from any cptx file, you can combine the interactive video slides with other content slides and/or quiz slides. Navigation between bookmarks in the interactive video and other content slides is very easy to set up.

MINUS

  • There is no platform like YouTube/Vimeo for interactive videos. Difficult to spread quickly to a wide public.
  • Embedding in a website takes more time. You cannot have a standalone version easy to distribute as is the case for pure video files.
  • Creation takes more time than for workflow 1

Workflow 3: Software simulations

I am only pointing to sims in Training or Assessment mode. I would never recommend to use the Demo mode to be published later on to MP4 because Video Demo offers much better quality. Although it is possible to publish to mp4, for those two modes this is not a real option since all interactivity would be lost.

Strangely this is the oldest workflow in Captivate, exists since I started to use it (Captivate 1) and even before when it was still labeled RoboDemo. Contrary to the video demo, this recording process leads to a slide-based cptx-file, which makes management and editing a lot easier. Replacing a draft audio file in a Video Demo can be a pain, but for software sims it is much easier to split the recording of the video part and the recording of the slide audio clips.

Software sims (Training/Assessment) use interactive objects to increase the level of interactivity: the learner has to perform actions, will not just ‘watch’ them done. Interactive objects can always be scored, and reported to a LMS. To my amazement, software sims with that scoring feature were largely appreciated by my former college students as self-assessments. They still didn’t like the real exams of course.

At this moment the biggest problem with software simulations are the slides which cannot be interactive because they show mouse movements/scrolling/dragging. At that moment FMR-slides (Full Motion Recording) are created. Those are SWF-based but will be converted to MP4 when publishing to HTML5. However that process is not working very well, and quality is not satisfactory. I tend to replace those FMR slides by  Video Demo slides. That makes the smooth recording workflow a lot more time consuming.

Use Case: most interactive tutorial, engages the learner better than the other workflows. Almost no limitations for remediation since all types of actions can be used.

PLUS

  • Still highest level of interactivity, both for Training and assessment mode.
  • All features of cptx-files are available.
  • Automatic adding of feedback messages, scoring possible, reporting to LMS with or without more quiz slides or scored objects
  • Easier management and editing due to slide-based approach
  • Audio clips can be added and synchronized later on, need not to be done during the ‘video’ part of the capture.

MINUS

  • Can be more time consuming although with good preparation lot is already automatic.
  • Similar to Workflow 2: need to use a webserver or a LMS, no distribution on platforms like YouTube/Vimeo
  • Standalone version (exe): not sure what the future will be when Flash Player has died
  • Cumbersome workflow if replacing FMR slides by Video Demo slides.

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The First Ten Learning Thursday Articles!

Last December, I began publishing Learning Thursday articles every other week. The series covers both learning technology and general training topics. Past articles are listed below.

Please comment if you have topic ideas, and follow me if you’d like to be notified of future posts.

  1. Mobile Technologies in Education
  2. Project-Based Learning
  3. Use Virtual Reality (VR) to Try on Makeup
  4. Is Constructivism an Effective Approach to Instructional Design?
  5. Overcome Your Blended Learning Phobia
  6. Track Classroom Attendance Using a Scan Gun
  7. How Do You Encourage Innovation in Your L&D Team?
  8. Plan a Consistent Training Program
  9. Immersive Learning Experiences in Real Life
  10. The Many Acronyms of Learning Technology

Connect with the author on Twitter or LinkedIn.

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Custom made Zoom-in Interaction for Better Training Performance

Zoom-in interaction is one of the best customized elearning interactions in Articulate Storyline 360. This type of interaction can be majorly used for learning and training purpose where learner can be immersed with real time interactions so that to retain the knowledge for a longer period. Instead of a simple text and image presentation you…

Learning Thursday #10 – The Many Acronyms of Learning Technology

Learning Thursday is a blog series that features a new L&D article every other week along with discussion points.  Read and then share your own ideas by commenting below!  Check out the last Learning Thursday here.

Have you ever noticed how many acronyms there are in the learning and development industry?

You’d think we were NASA.  Every instructional design model, every teaching method, and every new flavor of learning technology has an acronym.  Why?

In two words: Marketing strategy.

Take learning technology vendors for example.  Many acronyms are used to delineate different types of learning systems, when in fact the functionality across the categories is similar.  For reference, here are some of the more prominent learning system categories.  Feel free to comment other types below this article:

It’s not easy to define which system features or traits belong in which category.  It can be difficult to tell whether a specific platform is principally a learning management system (LMS), or a learning content management system (LCMS), or something else entirely.  An LMS can easily have learning record store (LRS) features, and vice versa.  Adobe Captivate Prime is an example of “hybrid” learning technology that straddles more than one category.

Here’s a video where I discuss similarities and differences between an LMS, LCMS, and LRS:

You might ask, if there’s so much overlap between system types, why don’t we just let go of these acronyms and refer to everything as a learning technology platform?  Because there’s the need for vendors to market their platforms.  And part of marketing is differentiation – making one product seem in some way better, more innovative, or more learner centric.  Making one type of learning technology seem more desirable than another.

I was talking recently with McLean & Company, contributing to their annual learning technology report that will come out this summer.  One of their questions was, “Are learning management systems going away?”  My response was that, in time, the term learning management system may indeed be replaced with something else.  But the inherent functionality we associate with an LMS – the course catalog, reporting capabilities, and much more – are necessary for many organizations and will continue to exist.

The fact of the matter is, it doesn’t matter which type of system a vendor provides, or what they call it.  What matters is whether their platform does what your organization needs, whether it’s user friendly, and whether the future of the platform is aligned to your organization’s goals.

If you are in the process of selecting a learning technology platform, look past the marketing verbiage and evaluate each platform for what it truly is.

Feel free to comment and share your opinions.

Try Adobe’s learning management system, Captivate Prime, for free.  Connect with the author on Twitter or LinkedIn, and follow me on Adobe’s eLearning blog.

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Importance of social learning in empowering collaborative learning at workplace

Social learning has been the eLearning buzzword for the couple of years where collaboration, engagement, personalization, efficiency is the reason for smooth and successful continuation. Learning can be achieved from-and-with anything, via on-job experience by collaborating with employees, interaction with peers or colleagues or from formal training itself. Here, this Article outlines- What is Social…

Learning Thursday #7: How Do You Encourage Innovation in Your L&D Team?

Learning Thursday is a blog series that features a new L&D article every other week along with discussion points.  Read and then share your own ideas by commenting below!  Check out the last Learning Thursday here.

How does your learning and development team approach new projects and courses?  Does your process encourage new ideas and teamwork?

This week’s video is an oldie but goodie.  ABC Nightline documented IDEO’s process of developing a new product.  The product team formulates new ideas, refines them, prototypes, and then continues to form their original ideas into a creative but practical final solution.  I’ve always enjoyed this video because it demonstrates the power of what the narrator refers to as constructive chaos.

  1. What specific practices in the video encourage new thinking and ideas?
  2. What specific practices ensure that creative ideas are eventually formed into practical solutions?
  3. How does your L&D team work together to develop innovative products?

 

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Attending the Adobe eLearning Conference on March 13?

It’s free! And there are lots of awesome speakers joining us in Washington DC!

There are two tracks on e-learning development and three more tracks on enterprise learning, multimedia training and virtual learning. You can check out the full session catalog here. My 2:30PM session is about increasing engagement through social learning, user generated content, and LMS gamification.

You can register for free. You can also register for the Adobe Captivate Specialist program on March 12 for a fee.

P.S. In addition to the learning sessions, the food is really good. I’m serious. 			</div><!-- .entry-content -->
	    
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