5 Killer Examples Of Interactive Videos For Corporate Training

Interactive videos can be used to create high-impact corporate training (for both formal training as well as for performance support). In this article, I showcase 5 killer examples of interactive videos for corporate training.

This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Interactive Video – Key Tools For an Immersive Learning Experience

E-Learning industry has clearly moved to HTML5, owing to the advantage of its support for multiple devices like tablets and smartphones. HTML5 offers great scope for creating better experience, including rich and app-like user experience on mobile browsers, richer images, and location-awareness to browsers. Videos have emerged as the most consumed media on smartphones and […]

How Can You Improve Your Corporate Training ROI Through Interactive Videos – Featuring 3 Examples

Interactive video is being considered the next big thing for mLearning or mobile learning solutions. It appeals to a wider audience (Millennials as well as other learner profiles) and is more engaging compared to videos. This article features 3 interactive video examples that showcase how you can improve your corporate training ROI.

This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Free eBook: Learning@Videos – Charting The Evolution, Success, And Growing Popularity Of Video-Based Learning

Most experts from the learning industry would agree that videos are a strong and impactful tool for learning. Videos can engage the learners and make lasting impressions on their mind. This is particularly useful in the area of corporate training, as the learners need to recall and apply the learning in their area of work. The eBook Learning@Videos traces the beginning of video-based learning and highlights its many benefits in the modern perspective of continual workplace training.

This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Pausing Timeline: Interactive Video Buttons

Intro

When I posted the article about Pausing the Timeline (part of the sequence of articles about that most important panel), I promised to add some use cases to illustrate using pause and pausing points. Let us start with a  simple use case, based on a recent forum question in this thread: Interactive Video Buttons

Use Case – description

It is clear that the user is not aware of the difference between pausing the timeline by an interactive object (pausing point) and by the command Pause. The idea is that the learner, while a video is playing, can launch a popup that has some static content (text, images…). While that popup is opened, the video should pause. On closing the popup the video should resume playing. The user proposed to have a close button for that purpose, which is the easiest solution (Scenario 1 below).   hyperlink instead of the close button as I described in this article: More is in a hyperlink – Close button
It could also be done with defining the open button as a toggle button Scenario 2).
For both scenarios it is necessary to insert the video as a multi-slide synchronized video to be able to control the video with Captivate functionality. If you insert the video as event video it will play totally independent from Captivate.

Scenario 1

In this scenario the popup will appear with one button, and be hidden by another button or hyperlink.
This makes it possible to have two actions, simplifies the setup: no need for a variable, no need for a conditional action. You can use two standard actions. If you want multiple buttons and popups, or expect to be using this work flow in other projects, I strongly recommend to create shared actions instead of advanced actions. This article will describe only the advanced standard actions.
Have a look at the setup of the slide. Look at the Timeline panel. It has only 3 objects (from bottom to top: video, shape button, popup). In the screenshot the shape button SB_Info is selected. It will open the popup ‘Info’. Look at the Timing properties of the button. The option to pause is unchecked (which is not the default situation), the shape button is timed for the rest of the slide. The result is that the button will be active for the whole slide, there is no inactive part.
The popup in this example is a shape used as text container, labeled ‘Info‘. That popup has to be invisible in output (eye icon in the Properties panel). If you expect that the slide can be revisited,  a better approach is to use the On Enter event of the slide to hide this popup ‘Info’. To close the popup I preferred using a hyperlink over a close button.  The popup is ta single object. If you prefer to have a ‘real’ close button, you’ll end up with two objects (text +  button). In that case you can group them, to reduce the number of commands for showing and hiding.

Standard Advanced Action ShowContent

This action is triggered by the Success event of the button SB_Info as you see in this screenshot:
After showing the popup (only one text container, can also be a group), I choose to disable the button SB_Info. If you want it to more user friendly, you can add a custom state ‘Inactive’ to that button and change to that state. This will avoid confusion for the user, some may expect that button to be a toggle, which is not the case in this first scenario. The last command will pause the timeline unconditionally, resulting in both video and audio to be paused.

Standard Advanced Action CloseContent

to be triggered by the hyperlink over the big X character:
if you prefer a Close button, this same action will be triggered by the Success event of that button; you can use exactly the same action
It is a similar advanced action (use the duplicate feature), with three commands which are the opposite of those in ShowContent: Hide (was Show), Enable (was Disable), and Continue which will release the Playhead, both video and audio will resume.

Scenario 2

In this scenario a Toggle button is used both for opening and closing the popup.

In that case you can use an approach similar to what I explained in: 1 action = 5 toggle buttons
It is a little bit more complicated because:
  • You need an extra custom state for the popup button which indicates that it changes to a close button after having opened a popup:
  • You’ll need a variable to track the status: I will use v_visib, a Boolean, with value = 0 when the popup is not visible,
    and value = 1 when the popup is visible; since I used a shared action from an external library, that variable is created automatically.
  • You’ll need a conditional advanced action to be triggered by the Success action of the button; this is the advanced action version created based on the shared action:

More Possibilities

An interactive video will often be spread over multiple slides, to offer navigation buttons to different parts of the video. It is not a problem to have the scenarios available on all slides: time both the button and the popup groups for the rest of the project, always on top.

I mentioned the possibility to group a close button with text, but groups with more objects are possible as well: image, shape, animations. Group all together, hide the group On Enter for the slide, and you only have to replace the single object in the scenarios above by the group.

Turn the actions into shared actions, and keep them in a separate project. You can open the Library of that project as an external Library in future projects. Especially the toggle action, it will save time because you don’t have to create the user variable.

Future use case, example of Pausing the timeline, will be about audio. It is more complicated because there are several ways to use audio in Captivate, perhaps I will need more than one post.

Popularity Of Videos As Learning Solutions

Use of videos for learning has always been a favourite option. These days, many organizations prefer video nuggets over lengthy learning programs. This article explores the reasons behind their popularity and the variety of videos that are used as learning solutions.

This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Free eBook: How To Use Interactive Videos For Learner Engagement And Supercharge Your Online Training

This free eBook How To Use Interactive Videos For Learner Engagement And Supercharge Your Online Training provides pointers on how you can use interactive videos to step up your learner engagement quotient.

This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Learning Insights 2017

kineo_201701c.jpgDie Karawane zieht weiter: von der LEARNTEC in Karlsruhe nach London zur Learning Technologies (1./2. Februar) Dort kann man sicher auch die Experten von Kineo treffen und mit ihnen über ihren neuesten Report diskutieren. Wieder haben sie Learning Professionals interviewt, um aktuellen Entwicklungen auf die Spur zu kommen. In der Einführung gestehen sie aber schon die “same themes, challenges and concerns”. So sind es vor allem bekannte Stichworte, die der Report aufnimmt: “speed”, “from courses to resources”, “social learning”, “content curation”. Neue Technologien? “Two types of tech stood out here - interactive video and virtual reality”.

Der Report ist gut geschrieben und gestaltet, bleibt aber an vielen Stellen an der Oberfläche. So lautet eine Empfehlung beim Stichwort “content curation”: “Check out tools that create an automated curation on specified subjects, to save you time hunting.” Und jetzt weiß der L&D Experte oder E-Learning-Spezialist im Unternehmen, was zu tun ist?
Kineo, 31. Januar 2017 (Regisrierung erforderlich)

7 Ways To Build Interactive Video Learning

For a truly engaging training experience, audio, quizzes, games, at-your-desk assignments, and other forms of learner engagement will make your training fully immersive and memorable. Here are 7 keys to building an effective interactive video learning experience.

This post was first published on eLearning Industry.