How to turn the staff training to contribute in the goals of an organization?

 

Every business will have their own goals to achieve and they make every possible effort to accomplish these goals effectively and efficiently. A very common goal that we find in most of the product/ service based companies is, providing an effective on-job training to up skill the staff. The best approach to meet the training goal is to establish direct connection between business goals and training.

In this blog we will discuss how we can connect business goals with training outcomes i.e. learning objectives?

Organizations should adopt a Top-down approach to reap maximum benefits out of their training efforts. The business goals should guide to define the skill sets and knowledge it requires in workforce.

But this transition is not simple as it appears to be. Generally, the business goals are defined in broader perspective and in different parameters – something which are defined in terms of monetary, market-share, technological advancements. These are quite different than an individual’s achievements as training outcomes.

This means,

“The broader organizational goals should be converted into learnable as well as measurable individual achievements – in terms of specific knowledge and skill sets that enable an individual (a human resource) to achieve broader goals of an organization”

Turn Business Goals into Learning Objectives

Learning and Development (L & D) professionals or Instructional Designers are responsible to align aims of learning with business needs.

Step 1 – Analysis: Analyze the business needs and workforce current capabilities

The business goals may not be described in measurable terms, but they must be put-in using plain and specific terminology that describes those best.

Sample business goal areas are as follows:

  • Increasing market share to ____% in 6 months
  • Lowering production cost to ___% in 12 months
  • Increase marketing team to ____ numbers in 3 months
  • Improve customer service with not more than 10% of tolerance in failing to fix complaints on-time

Against to these business goals, check the current capabilities of the corresponding workforce. This is to identify the gap between what is the current competency and what is required to meet these goals. List down all the gaps in accordance with their priority to meet respective business goals.

Step 2 – Define: Break broader business goals into specific and measurable learning objectives

Define all the gaps using specific and measurable terms such as Bloom’s verbs. Each gap may require multiple skills and knowledge areas, so list down the learning objectives as many as required to achieve business goals fully and effectively.

For example,

Business Goal: Improve customer service with not more than 10% of tolerance in failing to fix complaints on-time

Identified Gaps:

  • Customer care executives are not completely aware of the product features that company sells.
  • Customer care executives are not able to describe product features as mentioned in product manuals.

Learning Objectives:

  • List the product features as they are in the user manual supplied with the product.
  • Explain features using the terminology used in corresponding product technical manuals.

Conclusion

In step 2, you must have noticed how the business goal is transformed into learning objectives. The effectiveness of these transformation lies on the ability of L & D professional. After we develop learning objectives, we need to evaluate them; and the best approach is to develop sample content for each objective and check whether it is relevant in achieving the corresponding business goals.

Swift eLearning Services Pvt. Ltd. is one of the best eLearning companies in India helping organizations achieve their business endeavors using our custom eLearning solutions for workforce training.

Source link: http://www.swiftelearningservices.com/how-to-turn-the-staff-training-to-contribute-in-the-goals-of-an-organization/

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5 Reasons Outcome-Based Learning Outweighs Design-First Learning

Every successful journey starts with carefully plotting the eLearning course and knowing the destination. The same rule applies to personal and professional development. In this article, I'll share the top 5 reasons why outcome-based learning is better than design-first learning and 3 tips on how to successfully develop an outcome-based learning strategy. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

5 Reasons Outcome-Based Learning Outweighs Design-First Learning

Every successful journey starts with carefully plotting the eLearning course and knowing the destination. The same rule applies to personal and professional development. In this article, I'll share the top 5 reasons why outcome-based learning is better than design-first learning and 3 tips on how to successfully develop an outcome-based learning strategy. This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

The Most Desired Qualities of an Instructional Designer

Instructional Designer Qualities Required in eLearning

Instructional Designers are indispensable in an eLearning courseware development process. They are involved since the identification of the learning need to the learning solution implementation phase. They understand the problem, develop corresponding solution and devise a plan for its effective implementation.

Qualities-of-an-Instructional-Designer

Let’s discuss what qualities an Instructional Designer should possess to deliver these responsibilities.

An instructional designer should be a…
Quick Learner

As a professional courseware developer, Instructional Designers are ought to develop learning solutions on any concept under the sun. To do this, they must be quick learner with minimal assistances from SMEs.

Creative Explainer

An instructional designer should possess ‘Teacher’s Instinct’. Considering the Content, Learner and the Learning Outcomes; an instructional designer should adopt simple and intuitive explainer models at both, macro level (curriculum designs) and micro level (instructional strategies) of a learning solution.

Expository Writer

Writing has different styles to express your thoughts; but an instructional designer should possess an expository style of writing or developing the learning content. The content must be plain and easy to comprehend in simple efforts. Each piece of content should be put in a pattern that it construct one concept after the other.

Instructional Content Visualizer

Instructional Content incudes text, images, illustrations, videos etc. An instructional designer should represent these elements in an appropriate flow and graphic design sense. It includes the use of colors, symmetrical shapes, arrangement patterns and animation sequence.

Keen Reviewer

An instructional designer should have an eye for detail focus and correct every feature of an effective courseware development. High precision reviewing capability is vital to identify mistakes and loop-holes in content as well as other cosmetic designs. Even a minute element of the course should serve its intended purpose.

Innovator

Every learning need is unique with respect to the desired outcome behavior, learner and the content. An instructional designer must be an innovator to blend different instructional strategies and develop a unique learning solution for the problem. It requires an instructional designer to be well-versed in various instructional models, approaches and technologies.

Researcher

Developing a course requires lot of material to review. Quite often, clients supply content if it is related to organizational policies, specific products and services or in-house developed content (if any) etc. In normal course of work, an instructional designer define and get approve the learning objectives in specific behavioral terms and then develop content through their own research on Internet, Books, Videos etc. They ensure, the final content should help the leaner achieve the desired objectives.

Tech Savvy Developer

Every piece of courseware such as content, visuals, courseware development tools, learner interactive strategies etc. conveys some-meaning to learner; an instructional designer tries to have control on these and ensure learner receives the intended meaning. This require instructional designers to be conversant in learning science as well as in learning technologies such as eLearning authoring tools, sound editing software, image editing software etc.

Conclusion

An ideal instructional designer should possess capabilities to develop an effective eLearning courseware.

Source: http://www.swiftelearningservices.com/the-most-desired-qualities-of-an-instructional-designer/

Free eBook: 10 Steps To Developing Goals And Metrics For Your Employee Training Program

Employee training programs are the most common and usually effective way to enable employees to develop or improve skills. However, the success of an employee training program is not a standalone factor and comprises a plethora of elements. In this article, I’ll present what BizLibrary's free eBook 10 Steps To Developing Goals And Metrics For Your Employee Training Program contributes to the subject at hand.

This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Task-Oriented Course Example

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Task-Oriented Screen

In my blog article last week entitled “The Death of the (e)Learning Course Objectives Screen,” I showed some screenshots of a task-oriented course I produced which immediately engages the learners and brings them into the course.  While I incorporated screenshots in the course, I realize there’s nothing better than seeing the real thing.  So if you’d like, check it out for yourself. Watch how the “supervisor” avatar gives the assignment then actually leaves and heads off to a meeting, leaving you – the learner – there to figure out what to do next.  After you complete the task, the supervisor returns to comment on your progress. Click the image to launch the course.

Enjoy,

CHUCK