Adobe Learning Summit is in Las Vegas on October 3!

Las Vegas.  Great sessions for learning professionals.  Really really good food.

Where can you get all of these things for free?  The Adobe Learning Summit.  It’s happening on October 3, and the Captivate Specialist Program will be available on October 2.  Register now or check out the session listings.

I’ll be doing part of the opening session on October 3, and presenting an overview of Adobe’s learning management system at 2:45PM.  Check out the session description below.  Hope to see you there!

Adobe Captivate Prime 101: Deliver Blended & Social Learning Experiences with Adobe’s LMS

Want to know what’s new and unique in Adobe Captivate Prime? This session will take you on a tour of the entire learning management system, including Prime’s fluidic course player and new social learning features.

Join Katrina Marie Baker to learn how the new features can support your blended learning program. We will cover:

• A general overview of the platform from the user and administrator perspectives
• How Adobe Captivate Prime allows learners to share web-based and user generated content on topic-specific discussion boards
• Ways learners can create their own videos, audio, and screenshots directly in Captivate Prime
• The new social learning browser add-in that allows learners to share web content easily
• How the fluidic course player helps you deliver a variety of content on mobile devices and web pages outside of the learning management system

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Why should you use Online Assignments tool via Learning Management System?

Assignments usually deals with the assigning tasks to people as part of their project. It has proven to be an excellent tool in tracking and measuring of learner metrics via the Learning Management System (LMS). The assessments in an online course on eLearning platform involves written assignments and practical tests. Let’s look at some of…

What Is A Blended Learning LMS? 7 Features That Set Blended Systems Apart From Traditional Platforms

Blended learning can be a challenging concept to explain, especially in a software set-up. What are the specific elements that distinguish it from conventional training?

This post was first published on eLearning Industry.

Let The Learner Lead: How Learning Technology Can Support Skills, Competencies, & Constructivism (Includes Webinar Recording & Slides)

A big thanks to everyone who attended yesterday – a wonderful chatty group as always.  And thank you to eLearning Industry for hosting our discussion of learning technology and theory!

You can watch the recording or take a look at the slides:

The slide deck suggests some books that relate to the topics of skills and competencies.  I also mentioned articles on various topics, so here are those additional links:

Here’s the full session description:

How do you encourage a person to learn without telling them what to believe? How do you assess skills without asking learners to memorize facts? It’s all in the learning environment.

Many learning professionals incorporate constructivism into their instructional design approach. Constructivism seeks to actively involve the learner in a process of meaning and knowledge construction. Learners are exposed to an environment and framework that allows them to derive meaning as opposed to passively receiving information.

Katrina Marie Baker, Senior Learning Evangelist at Adobe, will provide food for thought on the following points:

  • Definitions of constructivism and some related terms, such as project-based, experiential, and inquiry-based learning
  • Benefits and limitations of constructivism
  • How constructivism can be applied to a training course or program
  • How to create an effective learning environment using technology
  • Suggested reading and additional resources

Connect with the author on Twitter or LinkedIn, and follow me on Adobe’s eLearning blog.

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[Free Webinar!] Let The Learner Lead: How Learning Technology Can Support Skills, Competencies, & Constructivism

So the last webinar was a little crazy in a very good way.  We had hundreds of people attend live or watch the recording to learn about how to spice up a training program with no budget, and persuade leadership to provide a larger budget next year.

Let’s talk about next week!  I’m doing a fun “learning theory” oriented topic for eLearning Industry.  We’re talking about skills, competencies, and constructivism – specifically how to use learning technology to support these elements within a learning environment.  You can register here for free or read the description below.

I love to talk about different learning theories like constructivism, and really enjoy when class participants bring their own ideas of why and how constructivism and other learning approaches should be employed.  I do not believe that constructivism is “the answer” or the correct approach in all situations.  That would be awfully boring, wouldn’t it?  We as instructional designers should pick the right approach for each situation.  Let’s talk about some of our options during class.  Please bring your ideas – we always have a chatty, involved audience.

Let The Learner Lead: How Learning Technology Can Support Skills, Competencies, & Constructivism

How do you encourage a person to learn without telling them what to believe? How do you assess skills without asking learners to memorize facts? It’s all in the learning environment.

Many learning professionals incorporate constructivism into their instructional design approach. Constructivism seeks to actively involve the learner in a process of meaning and knowledge construction. Learners are exposed to an environment and framework that allows them to derive meaning as opposed to passively receiving information.

Katrina Marie Baker, Senior Learning Evangelist at Adobe, will provide food for thought on the following points:

  • Definitions of constructivism and some related terms, such as project-based, experiential, and inquiry-based learning
  • Benefits and limitations of constructivism
  • How constructivism can be applied to a training course or program
  • How to create an effective learning environment using technology
  • Suggested reading and additional resources

Group discussion will take place throughout the session.

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Memes & Scavenger Hunts: Ten Ways to Improve Your L&D Program on a Budget (Includes Webinar Recording & Slides)

Yesterday’s webinar discussed memes, scavenger hunts, and other cost effective ways to spice up a training program. The session was one of the most popular yet – over 1,300 registrations and hundreds of people who have attended live or watched the recording so far.  A lot of awesome ideas were shared by the audience.

You can watch the recording or take a look at the slides:

The slides include links to additional resources.  Here they are:

Here’s the full session description:

Is your learning and development budget missing some zeros? This session is for you. Sadly, Oprah isn’t going to attend and give everyone a new bank account. But you will get boatloads of budget-stretching ideas from your colleagues during this interactive session. You can still provide a great learning environment, even if you’re running short on funds!

Katrina Marie Baker, Senior Learning Evangelist at Adobe, will provide some practical tips on how to:

  • Engage learners in the classroom or virtual classroom without spending money
  • Get help from departments outside of L&D (yes, you can make this happen!)
  • Use learning technology to make your L&D team more efficient
  • Persuade leadership to give you more funding next year

Connect with the author on Twitter or LinkedIn, and follow me on Adobe’s eLearning blog.

The post Memes & Scavenger Hunts: Ten Ways to Improve Your L&D Program on a Budget (Includes Webinar Recording & Slides) appeared first on eLearning.

Build a Participatory Culture to Engage Learners (Learning Thursday #16)

Check out the last Learning Thursday article on connected learning here.

In a participatory culture, individuals take an objective into their own hands with the intention of achieving a collective goal.  In the classroom, instructors can create a participatory culture that drives their learning process forward, with the intention of building knowledge. Interactions within the learning community lead to group knowledge greater than the sum of the individuals.  Educational technology provides the practical structure individuals need to collaborate and pass on knowledge.

In a participatory learning culture, each subject matter expert is also a learner.  Different mediums and topics are offered for public consumption, and contributors often don’t care whether they make money off of what they’ve created.  They just want to share their passions.  To me, participatory learning cultures are an example of education being driven by love.

The Harry Potter Alliance is an example of a collective effort intended to create change in a number of social and cultural issues.  The 100,000+ students who are part of the alliance incite major social changes. They pursue new legislation and are capable of gathering massive charitable contributions.  These accomplishments are possible because a number of individuals chose to be motivated by their unified passions.

How can the concept of collaboration be applied to classroom experiences, and how can we enable teachers to deliver such experiences?  In considering my own work for Adobe, I think about the Adobe eLearning community.  Community members are spread across the world, and they interact through a combination of Adobe conferences and smaller events, on-site classes, virtual classes, and an online community.  Adobe also participates in outside events and communities, such as the Association for Talent Development’s conferences, and web sites like Training Magazine Network.

Adobe’s community members create projects, share what they’ve done, and troubleshoot each other’s issues. The community’s collective imagination is applied to a topic, problem, or project. This makes everyone’s projects better, and over time, it helps Adobe enhance products by listening to customer feedback.

A similar knowledge building process occurs in wikis.  There’s a certain amount of chaos – one person generates the idea for an article, others begin contributing, some information is correct, some is not, revisions occur, sometimes facts are debated to determine validity… and this cycle goes on for as long as necessary in order to finally reach a relatively finished product.

The founder of Wikipedia, Jimmy Wales, discussed how contributors on Wikipedia are essentially building and revising an encyclopedia collectively.  While anyone can submit revisions, there are 600-700 “core contributors” who work together, build the majority of articles, and critique each other’s work.  Often one person will start an article and others will get excited and begin helping to build it.  Every article reflects diversity of thought, which is a key benefit of the wiki format.  Having multiple individuals contribute leads to a more neutral and balanced viewpoint.

One key aspect of the participatory culture is that learning and teaching can occur at the same time, in a complex real world environment.  Individuals could be analyzing content, and reflecting on how their own knowledge and experiences tie in, while at the same time contemplating what they can add to enhance what already exists.

If you’re interested in creating a participatory culture for your corporate training program, check out Adobe Captivate Prime.  You can create discussion boards for your learners, and Prime’s built-in editing tool allows them to create and share videos, audio, and much more.  Here’s a demo of Prime’s social learning features.  And here’s a recent webinar I presented on ways to engage learners without breaking the bank.

Connect with the author on Twitter or LinkedIn, and follow me on Adobe’s eLearning blog.

 

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13 Helpful Moodle Plugins To Make The Most Of Moodle

Moodle plugins absolutely pave the way to tailor-make the Moodle LMS as per your organization's Learning and Development (L&D) needs. Here is a list of 13 helpful Moodle plugins that you can incorporate into your LMS. Some of them may not be famous, but they do an incredible job! This post was first published on eLearning Industry.