Adobe Captivate – Card Flip Effect

In this video tutorial, I show you how you can use effects in Adobe Captivate to create the effect of a baseball card flip. For example, on one side of the card you have the image of the baseball player and on the back side, you have the player’s statistics. This could also be used to simulate what recipe cards might look like or used in credit card training that teaches employees to check for the signature of a client, and so on.

In this example, I used the baseball card for Bo Obama, President Barack Obama’s pet dog. Don’t ask me why they made a baseball card for the family pet, but like all government photography, it’s in the public domain so I’m free to use it for this example.

My Patreon subscribers can download the project file for this video.
https://patreon.com/paulwilsonlearning

Managing Advanced Actions

When managing Advanced Actions in Adobe Captivate, I recommend that you open the Advanced Actions window from the drop down menu rather than from the Actions tab in the Properties of a slide or object. This way you reduce the risk of accidentally selecting a new Advanced Action in place of what was there from the start. Click on the Project dropdown menu and select Advanced Actions. Alternatively, you can press SHIFT+F9 (which doesn’t always work for me) to open the Advanced Actions window. Once open you can scroll through all the Advanced Actions in your project using the Existing Actions selection drop-down shown below.

2018-01-27 1-26-32 PM

You should become familiar with the toolbar controls just above this drop-down selection box.

toolbar1The first icon is Preview Action. This makes Advanced Actions easier to read and share with others. Normally items like your Else statements are collapsed so using Preview Action will show the entire script in one list. If you want help troubleshooting Advanced Actions on the forum, using the script as it’s written here is helpful to the other users assisting you. Here is an example Conditional Action I have for one of my projects:

2018-01-27 1-20-57 PM

toolbar2The next icon is the plus symbol and allows you to start making a new blank Advanced Action.

toolbar3After that is the import icon which allows you to import Shared Actions. A well created Shared Action is completely reusable and can be shared across more than one project. It also can be used multiple times within the same project just by changing the parameters that reference various objects and variables used throughout your project. Here is a video tutorial I did some time ago on Shared Actions if you would like to learn more: https://youtu.be/uoTe03qcGNs

toolbar4The next icon is to export Shared Actions and will be greyed out if you don’t presently have any Shared Actions in your project. Captivate Shared Actions can be saved as a CPAA file format but they can reside as part of your Captivate Library if you don’t need them to be stored outside of a single project file.

toolbar5This is the delete action icon and its function is self explanatory. I use this when I’m feeling overwhelmed by all the extraneous Advanced Actions I might end up with in an eLearning project. This is mostly due to starting an Advanced Actions and then abandoning it and rewriting it and so on. The good news is that if you try to delete an Advanced Action that is in use somewhere in your project you will get a warning like the following:

2018-01-27 1-46-05 PM

Just be careful when deleting these advanced actions that you don’t delete something you actually need.

toolbar6Lastly is my favourite icon from this section and that’s the Duplicate Advanced Action icon. As the name suggests this icon will make a copy of the currently selected Advanced Action. You will find that there are many sets of advanced actions that are reused. The modern solution for cases where you need a similar version of an advanced action duplicated is to simply use Shared Actions. Duplicating actions and making a few small changes to them was the way things were done before Shared Actions were introduced in Adobe Captivate version 7. Also some people are just more comfortable making a new action from the old action. The duplicate action will be named “Duplicate_Of_” followed by the original name and then a number to make sure that duplicated actions are named something already in use.

Adobe Captivate – Advanced Answer Option Using Fluid Boxes

As some of you may know, The advanced answer option hasn’t proven to be all that compatible with the new fluid box responsive design features in Adobe Captivate 2017. Hopefully, this is something that Adobe will rectify in the not too distant future. In the meantime, please check out my workaround that uses a single shape that uses multi-state objects.

Adobe Captivate – Advanced Answer Option Using Fluid Boxes

As some of you may know, The advanced answer option hasn’t proven to be all that compatible with the new fluid box responsive design features in Adobe Captivate 2017. Hopefully, this is something that Adobe will rectify in the not too distant future. In the meantime, please check out my workaround that uses a single shape that uses multi-state objects.

Adobe Captivate – Custom Start for Mobile

Working with stakeholders can sometimes get challenging when you need to educate and set their expectations with regards to the norms that most of us take for granted. One example of this is the fact that mobile OS platforms don’t allow for the auto-playing of content on the web. Unfortunately, this includes eLearning. What this means to you and I is that when you publish an eLearning course for the web and access it via a mobile device, learners will need to click an extra play button to get started. In this Adobe Captivate Quick Tip, I show you how you can customise the start project screen when publishing for mobile devices to at least make this a little more interesting to view.

Adobe Captivate Alignment Toolbar

Adobe Captivate Alignment Toolbar

I’m always looking for shortcuts in online learning design. One of my favourites is the Adobe Captivate Alignment Toolbar. To use for each session you will need to check Enable custom workspaces/panel undocking in your Adobe Captivate Preferences. This option can be found in the General Settings Category.

Preferences Window

As the entry suggests you will need to restart Adobe Captivate for the changes to take effect, but the advantage is that you will be able to permanently turn various toolbars on or off as you see fit. Those changes will be persistent each time you start Captivate. You can then turn on the Adobe Captivate Alignment Toolbar by selecting it from the Window drop-down menu.

Once the Alignment Toolbar appears in your Captivate interface you can save time aligning, resizing, and ordering your on-slide objects with ease. Sure you can right click your objects and select the same settings, however, this requires two mouse clicks. Having the toolbar up on your screen saves you a mouse click for each of these alignment adjustments. Over the course of a lifetime of Captivate projects, the toolbar will save you time and many clicks.

Here is a simple and FREE job aid on what each icon from the toolbar can do for you. The link takes you to my website where you can download this job aid.

https://www.paulwilsonlearning.com/articles/alignment

 

Adobe Captivate – Different Feedback for Each Answer

In this Adobe Captivate video tutorial, I will share with you an almost hidden feature known as Advanced Answer Option. It’s related to multiple choice single answer quiz questions but the feature isn’t found in the Quiz Properties. Instead, you can find this feature in the Properties Panel for your multiple choice answers themselves. It’s useful if you want to create unique feedback captions for each answer, but you can also assign unique actions to each answer as well. You can use Advanced Answer Options to create branching scenarios or simply use them to provide remediation for your knowledge check or quiz question slides.