What Facebook knows about me (and you)

This week (March 2018) there has been a lot written about Facebook, the data it collects, the data it ‘sells’ and the data available to developers, marketers, advertisers, etc. I’ll not go into it here but you may want to read these posts to get the general idea, if you don’t already, why everyone is suddenly worried about their Facebook data – here and here and here and here. There are more. Many more. It won’t take long if you want to find more.

I’ve tried, very half-heartedly and without any success, to delete Facebook from my life before. I’ve gone as far as deleting the Facebook apps from all my devices and only use it through a browser interface now on one device. I know this was only a token gesture to take back control of the data I transmit to Facebook and ‘associates’. I try really hard to ignore the quiz and adverts, I pass over the standard ‘copy this to your wall if you …’ chain-statuses, I avoid commenting or ‘liking’ statuses when friends and family post updates saying ‘having a lovely time in …’ when I know it’s advertising their homes as empty for the next week or so.

I am careful what I do share, I don’t say when I’m away or post anything about where I am when I am away, I don’t check-in to places anymore (I used to enjoy Foursquare and Instagram, they’re both history to me now) and I don’t share anything personal. Even saying this, Facebook has algorithms that can take what I do post, and the data I’m transmitting without even knowing it, and build a profile of me based on this and past behaviour. The scary bit is it also knows a lot about all my other online behaviour through my devices and browser, even if I’m not on or been near Facebook for days. 


So, I’ve downloaded my Facebook data archive to see what they have. This will be interesting … I hope it won’t be embarrassing?
Click To Tweet


So, I’ve downloaded my Facebook data archive to see what they have. This will be interesting … I hope it won’t be as embarrassing as it was for Jon Porter? For the record, it’s 230mb of data from over 11 years on Facebook. While I look over the data I will have to remember that privacy and settings were different back then, and what I allowed Facebook to do has changed as I’ve grown up (and the platform itself has grown too).

First things first. Once you’ve download your archive you have to unzip it. Once unzipped you’ll have a main ‘index.html’ page and several folders. Open the file in a browser and, well, off you go.

Facebook archive

And here it all is … friends, deleted/un-friended friends, ignored friends, messages, status updates, photos, videos, ad history, which advertisers have my contact info, ad topics, apps, etc. I think it’s fair to say, on looking through this, that this is all based on the current settings (certainly for apps) as there is quite a bit that historically I know to be different. 

Scare #1

What is scary is actually nothing about me, it’t what it knows about you! Or rather, what it knows about me through someone else’s account that somehow I’ve interacted with or been linked to. It’s not even about friends or friends-of-friends. In my archive is mentions to other people who I’ve interacted with over time. I would love to see what this is like for someone who hasn’t locked down their profile and privacy settings as a lot of this looks like it would link elsewhere, to other profiles, etc. 

Scare #2

Even without knowing it, but on some level I guess I did, I was sharing my location. I turned all settings to private and no location sharing ages ago, but it can still take the geolocation data in a photo and use that to plot where I am. Under the ‘security’ page there are lots and lots of IP address from where I’ve logged in, including device, browser time, etc. Not a surprise really, knowing what I do about Facebook already, but still a bit of a shock to see it all listed like that!

If we link this (and this is my own interpretation here based on articles and developments elsewhere in the ‘internet’, to programmes, apps and algorithms) Facebook can take my photo and work out where it was taken, who is in it (even without tagging them) and make assumptions based on it. Lots of photos in the countryside … adverts for hiking, walking, outdoors equipment. Photos of London … adverts or ‘stories’ for London hotels or restaurants. I rarely tag people in my photos so Facebook wont be able to cross-pollenate it’s data that way, but who’s to say what they’re working on behind the scenes?

Scare #3

Data on each photo has the IP address it was loaded using as well as the metadata from the photo file itself .. including ISO speed, exposure, latitude and longitude. Everything there to identify where I am. Even the most careful of us can still be caught out like this is we’re not careful. What I can see is that, for some photos, where I’ve used an app like PhotoShop Express or Prisma, much of this data is stripped. This is good, but often the lat/long coordinates are still there as well as the IP Address. All pointing to where I was. Example below I’m happy to share as it was Barcelona airport on the way back from a work trip.

Scare #4

Messages I’ve sent or received are there in the download too. I can’t quite figure the order out as it doesn’t look to be all of them, certainly my most recent ones aren’t there. It was a surprise to read the one at the top of the list as I don’t remember ever seeing it before. It was from a friend of a friends trying to find each other again. 

Well …?

All in all this wasn’t the big massive scare I was maybe waiting for or been told to expect by the media, but it’s still an eye opener on the massive amount of data I’ve shared willingly over the years. In isolation this data isn’t really outstanding … but link my profile to the profiles of my friends you’ll get a bigger picture of me and my emotions (which advertisers would love to know about to target their ads to me in times of stress or need). Mix my data to that of others who like similar films or sports or go to the same events or watch the same films, you’ll get a different picture. You get the picture now? This is why 50 million profiles is a big deal!

The scare will probably come in the next few weeks or months when we get to hear more about what goes on with this data in the Facebook data centres. Processing, cross-checking and tagging, etc. through friend lists, photos, locations, likes, messages, adverts clicked, etc. This is where the likes of Cambridge Analytica make their mark, by taking the data and using it to profile an individual, a community, a nation, etc. This is where the power in the data lies, this is where we have been taken in recent years and where we ought to be very closely monitoring what is done with our data.

Will this stop me using Facebook? No. Not yet anyway. I’ve always been wary of anything free and what I share openly or privately. I have thought about deleting my profile and account for a few years and will probably continue to procrastinate a while longer. It might be different if I wasn’t already aware and careful of sharing too much online, if my privacy wasn’t already set quite high. 

Will this stop others using Facebook? No doubt about it, it seems many are shelving their accounts in droves, but will it affect the network in general? What kind of volume would Facebook consider enough to warrant worrying about? Many more millions than we think would be my guess. While there’s talk about ‘the end of facebook’ I think as a company and social platform it’ll continue onwards and will recover. Many of us, me included, will never trust them again, like we haven’t really up until now, and will be even more careful than before. But for many many many more they will carry on regardless or even in spite of the Cambridge Analytica expose.

As part of my previous work with students and their use of social media I used to ask them “when was the last time you Googled yourself?” Perhaps that’s too old now (but still relevant), perhaps we should be asking ourselves “when was the last time you reviewed you social posting history?”


'When was the last time you Googled yourself?' is old news. We should be asking 'when was the last time you reviewed you social posting history?'
Click To Tweet


Image source: Kārlis Dambrāns (CC BY 2.0)

Career path

Reflection can be good for the soul. It can also be a time-waster and detractor from doing something more productive instead. This reflection is the 17th entry in my ‘what is a learning technologist’ series.

How many of us, when we entered the realm of learning technology, had a career path mapped out? How many of us have since started thinking longer term and working towards a particular goal, be it research, further/higher study, academia, or senior and managerial roles? I certainly didn’t. However, and this is where reflection is good for the soul, it is something I started to think more clearly about and began to focus on more and more.

Yes, I began my CMALT journey in 2008 (ten years ago!) but it wasn’t until 2013 I gained the CMALT qualification. Last year (2017) I renewed my portfolio and submitted my new(er) CMALT portfolio and was re-accredited CMALT. In that time so much has changed personally and professionally. Not least I am less likely to on the coal face with loading learning materials and engaging with academic author (I still am) but I’m more likely to be having conversations on strategy, course (product) management, course purpose and audience (proposition), contractor discussions or platform and development meetings. This is the basis of my new role with EasyCareAcademy, ‘Manager, Product and Proposition’.

A few weeks ago I was invited to join a small but highly focused group (Maren Deepwell, John Kerr, Lorna Campbell, Susan Greig) to discuss CMALT, CPD and how we process and capture our own progress. From this has come a few blog posts but also the reflection on the above. For me the question is still about what do I need to capture to show CPD, rather than what. I consider everyday to be a series of CPD activities – thankfully, no day is the same so it’s always a learning curve – that are both given to me and that I go away and find. All in the name of keeping myself interested in my work, trying to do something new or different, and keeping momentum and motivation. Do I need to keep a log of everything I do (that could take a while)? Do I need to apply some kind of priority to it (that could be tricky as not everything shows it’s importance until some time after the event when links can be made to other people or work)? Hmm, this needs more work.

Learning technology is still my bread and butter but now it’s making sure the organisation is set up to receive both the product and proposition is key. So. Here’s the question .. where are you heading? Do you know,? Do you have a plan? Do you need one? 

Image source: Simon Clayson (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Relationships

Development of materials for online, distance, blended and campus-based courses can be a pleasurable experience. It can also be fraught with issues not least constraints in time, budgets, resources, personalities, egos, etc. How can we manage this? It’s quite easy really … keep the conversation and communications flowing.

The worst thing that can happen during the time set aside to design, develop and implement the materials is that there is a breakdown in the process or communications. Breakdowns will and do happen, it’s how you manage it that can determine how quickly you can get back on track. If the goal or deadline that you’re working to is a sensible and achievable one then I always see that as the starting point to work back from. You have three months? Excellent, drop a week or two off that for final checks and testing. You’ll need it.

From there work out any leave or national holidays between now and then. This might throw up further family leave or conference activity that will mean part of your team will be unavailable. Work out roles and responsibilities, assign these according to expertise or availability. Let everyone know who is doing what, when and why. I don’t like them but a Gantt chart will really help you here. Keep it updated, no matter how hard or late. Keep it stored centrally, with all your other files and resources, and let everyone know where it is and why it’s there. Refer to it regularly. Point everyone to it regularly and check you’re on schedule for each milestone. It’s better to find out early you’ll miss a milestone, you can work with that, than to find out the day after it was due. If that happens then there is something more serious happening here (see below), your team should be able and willing to give bad news as well as receive it. Milestones move, but identifying them early helps mitigate any serious delays.


Work out a communication structure early, stick to it, hold others to it, don't let it drop...
Click To Tweet


Work out a communication structure early, stick to it, hold others to it, don’t let it drop, encourage delays to be caught up, don’t sacrifice the end goal – once you do that it’ll become acceptable for those deadlines to be ‘flexible’ and sometimes ignored.

The elephant in the room, if there is one, is that the academic or team you’re working with is not particularly interested or engaged in the project or course. Sometimes this is because they’re just very busy and this isn’t a priority for them. It could also be that they’ve had this work dropped in their lap and are effectively forced to engage (or not). Whatever the reason, keeping on side with them is key to the relationship. 

We’ve all struggled at some point or another with team members dragging the heals as part of the process. As I said earlier, there are many personal or work related reasons. For me it’s always been key to remain helpful, informative, supportive and focussed. If you’re on message and on time or budget, others will take your lead and follow suit. Mostly. For those who don’t, if you’re in communication with them then the relationship you have can help bring it back on track. Yes, their office may be gathering dust and they’re never on campus, but you do have a phone and their number. Call them. If they are on campus but just busy (or avoiding you?) then I often seem to find people in the queue for a coffee between lectures [smile]. Don’t get all heavy, just a short ‘hi’ and chat to ask about progress or how they are is sometimes enough to find out that, yes, they are sorry for the delay and, yes, they’re nearly finished. There, no great panic. Back on track again.

Sometimes we spend time and effort building a relationship we often forget that it needs maintenance and regular tweaking to keep it fresh and working. Circumstances can change, as do projects or timescales. Build the relationship and work on it and you will find those you work with will also share your passion for the work and that three month deadline is easy, after all!

Image source: clement127 (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Sharing

Recent themes to my work has been the nature of how, and what, we share. I wanted to reflect a little on my own ‘sharing’ here, and try and split the sharing from social media, if possible. 

There are obvious easy ways to write about my sharing (per platform) but also I want to think about the why? So, why? I can’t deny one major factor is to reach a wider audience than just those I immediately work with on a day-to-day basis. By sharing my ideas or thoughts or projects or interests I’m obviously creating and managing my brand (me) but I also hope to be of some influence to others working in the same sphere as me.

Blogging

Obviously, there’s this blog. Back when I started writing here I used to write about the day-to-day tasks and tools I used. The last few years has seen me change direction, mainly due to possible conflict of interest with where I’ve worked and the need to keep some commercially sensitive things private. I’ve developed it more recently to be about the why I do things and how I develop myself or my work, my attitude to learning and technology and how use them both. I write here to share experiences and ideas, books I’ve read and reviewed, books I’ve written and curated, etc. I write to have a brain-dump, drop ideas or stress, I write to see what you all think … What do you think?

Twitter

I share my blog posts on Twitter so I can reach more people, and engage the wider field of learning technology. It reaches more people this way and I can engage in conversations beyond my own understanding, therefore helping me widen my appreciation and knowledge for my work. My Twitter activity involved my blog but also other aspects of my work, and sometimes home life too, but mainly my work. I save tweets to my ‘like’ (although I still don’t use it as “ooh, I like this tweet” but rather as a save feature to go back and read or reply to something after the fact) and add people to my lists. Twitter is my go-to place all day and pretty much everyday. My network or followers and those I follow grows and changes all the time, therefore my exposure to new ideas or tools does too.

LinkedIn

I’ve been and gone on LinkedIn before and, at the moment, am back and engaging here again. The audience is different to Twitter, less chat and more ‘sharing’. Perhaps it’s because it’s viewed as more of my online CV, or perhaps because there’s different mechanisms for comments, etc. I don’t know, but LinkedIn is an acquired taste. Currently I like it, but I take it each day at a time with all my sharing. 

Pinterest/Flipboard

I use both these platforms more for searching and reading different themes, less so for my own sharing, but I appreciate the work others are putting into their sharing activities here. For some these are important channels for sharing their work or ideas, and that’s fine.

This is, after all, about what works for you or me. There is no rule that will work for everyone, we are each individual and have different perspectives and needs and likes, and this is what we each bring to the wider community. THIS is what makes our personal (learning) networks so vibrant and interesting. This is why I love to share .. I take so much from the community on all these platforms, I want to add something back in the hope (need?) that it makes a difference to someone like something I’ve just taken. Isn’t sharing great!


Sharing: why and how. It may be a tweet, a blog post, an idea, a photo. This is sharing. For me.
Click To Tweet


Facebook

I suppose I ought to add this here too although I’m still thinking of dumping my account here. Facebook has only ever been about family and friends. I dabbled in having a work-type account but realised the audience was the same, but smaller, than my twitter audience so decided it wasn’t worth the extra time to manage and curate it. 

Above all I try and keep my sharing professional. I have interests that creep into my sharing every now and then, mainly on Twitter. Yes, I have two kittens, I drink tea not coffee, I love Lego. But it’s still shared with a view to what my audience may be interested in. I don’t follow celebrities, for the most part, as I’m just not that interested in what they’re doing. Unless they are the kind of people I think are celebrities like Steve Wheeler, Stephen Heppell, Sue Beckingham, Amy Burvall, Maren Deepwell, et al (see the people I’ve been lucky to work with on my books, these are the celebrities in my world!). Then, of course, I’m a groupie and will follow them anywhere I can.

What about you? What is your strategy (if you have one) for sharing?

Image source: iSchumi (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Authenticity

When you buy a new car or buy a new TV you go to a showroom who deals in the car or TV, either it’s an official retailer for the item or it has a reputation you trust. Well, we used to at any rate. It seems these days, and I’m equally guilty of this, we go online and find the cheapest version. There, that’ll do. Even if we use a ‘reputable’ website we may find ourselves buying the £5 USB cable made by a company we’ve never heard of instead of the £15 cable from one we have. “It’s OK, it’s from Amazon, it’ll be OK.” (Other online retailers exist, try them out too sometime!)

Is it the same with our learning? When choosing a college or university we look at a lot of things about it, not only the details of the course and individual topics within it but things like accommodation, proximity to the town or shops, on-campus events, clubs, sports facilities, reviews from previous students, etc. I don’t remember even thinking about who would teach me my degree, I looked into everything BUT the teaching staff. Is this wrong?

It seems different when looking at the different MOOCs on offer, I find myself looking at the course team as much as the course syllabus itself. A MOOC on Shakespeare? Why, yes please … but who wrote it and who’s delivering it? Ahh, a ‘renowned Shakespearean academic’ in Professor Bate and it’s been developed by the University of Warwick (ranked consistently in the UKs’ top 10 universities). That kind of makes up my mind .. even though the course page doesn’t say much about the course contents, other than the promo video

I’ve worked on a number of MOOCs and online courses as well as blended and campus/classroom based courses. There are many differences in what I/we do depending on the audience and delivery method, but the courses that have an element of face-to-face contact doesn’t really need the teacher introduced as part of the designed materials. This is, or should be, done in person. Often the first lecture or contact point with the students will be an introduction made by the teacher on who they are, what their background is and why they are the one who should give the course. Often courses are taught by a team, sometimes led by the senior academic and supported by either junior academics or PhD students. Are they also included in the list of authors or facilitators? They have equal right to be there, especially if the learners have more contact with them (in person or online) than the ‘lead’. This is content given to the students and often not part of the slides they can download for each lecture. There may be some info on the VLE, but is it really enough to showcase the breadth of knowledge behind the course and it’s creation?


Authenticity and credibility in online learning
Click To Tweet


For these courses with contact time it seems it doesn’t really matter that this stuff isn’t written in to the course itself. For online courses of any nature or audience it is imperative this information is front and centre. If you can highlight prior to the course (especially for MOOCs) the credibility of the authoring and teaching team it will enhance the authenticity of the course itself.

This is often overlooked in some online courses and is why I insist on having this information front and centre in the courses I work on. This gives the course and the whole course team the credibility to be the ones to deliver and facilitate the course, and it gives the content and materials the authenticity needed to demonstrate to the learners that this team has experience and background to be the best team to lead it.

There are so many options and ways to learn online, sometimes the number of courses on a similar subject exist. So, which one will you choose? The one that looks nice? The cheapest one, or the one that has been developed and delivered by the best team possible, therefore giving you the best possible learning experience?

Yeah, me too.

Image source: Ara Pehlivanian (CC BY-NC 2.0)

What I’ve learned from my kids: Motivation

A while ago I started writing about things I’ve started to learn from watching my kids grow and how they see things. I’ve started to realise how much I take for granted. Or rather I’ve started seeing things through their eyes and realised that, for them, the world can be simpler, yet harder, than I thought.

Gamification is something I’ve used in my work (badges, progress indicators, social interactions, etc.) and i’ve used as part of my (old) social media activities. Remember FourSquare? However, the best way I’ve used it myself is at home, with my two boys aged 7 and 8. Whilst I’m sure there are some excellent ways to gamify the home for rewards for tidying up, being kind and compassionate, coming off screen-time quietly, etc. this one way I’m going to describe here has worked wonders … exercise. And by exercise I mean walking.

We’re not exactly an active family, in that we don’t play sport, but we are active in that we walk rather than drive if we can, we get the bikes out and go for cycle around our village, and we go for (longish) walks. While the ‘let’s get the bikes out’ is normally a good thing, in their eyes, we nearly always get a grumpy retort when we say something like ‘let’s go for a walk’. Even if we promise to stop off and get a snack on the way back, it’s not a very popular event.

Then we tried geocaching. Everything changed. In a nutshell, for us, geocaching is a means to make a country walk interesting, give the boys something to aim for and a small amount of competition between them on who finds the cache first.

“Geocaching is an outdoor recreational activity, in which participants use a GPS receiver or mobile device and other navigational techniques to hide and seek containers, called “geocaches” or “caches”, at specific locations marked by coordinates all over the world.” Wikipedia

We look for caches that are part of a series and follow the cache around using my phone and Geocache app. Each cache site can be used using the GPS and map within the app, and each cache has a clue to help identify exactly where it is when you reach the GZ (ground zero). Sometimes the cache is magnetic and small (I mean really small, so it can take a while to find) and sometimes it’s a box or container where you can leave ‘swaps’ for others to take. All caches are well hidden so they’re not interfered with or removed, and some are hidden so well we end up flagging them as DNF / ‘did not find’.

What has changed is that the kids don’t complain when we say we’re going out. Whereas a short walk of a mile or so would’ve been met with complaints and grumpy shoe-shuffling a few months ago, now we’re doing 4 and 5 mile walks and going from cache to cache, finding the GZ and then seeing which of us finds the cache first. Some are easier than others, some are a nightmare to find, especially if they’re hidden in the undergrowth and it’s the sort that stings.

Link this to another app I use called Map My Walk we can see how far we’ve walked … very important as these walks are also being used for the boys and their Beavers/Cubs hike badge! See, it’s all part of the larger plan. 

Gamifying our walks has worked, and the kids don’t even realise we’ve done it. We’re slowly covering the areas immediately around where we live, but we’ve also met family members further afield and done some cache’s with them. We also found a few when in Austria a couple of weeks back, and it was the kids who wanted to try. The motivation is now there, they love what we do as they want to beat their friends, who are also geocachers, or compete with family members on who can reach the next milestone number of cache’s found. 

Geocaching Map My walk

Image source: Trevor Manternach (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Speakerphone

The past four months have seen me working remotely and from home. Not only has it meant more time with the family but it’s meant the technology has been essential to my ability to work, and I’ve put it all to extremely good use. I think I ought to write an update to my EdTechRations … ?

One item I could not be without is a speakerphone for the daily Skype calls I have. I’ve got a Jabra Speak 410 speakerphone and it means I can be natural and comfortable on calls, even walk around the room as we talk. I don’t need a headset which doesn’t limit me to where I can be. It’s compact and light so easily transport where I need to be and it has excellent microphone with no feedback. I’m a convert!

Obviously it’s not practical in an open office where you probably don’t want everyone hearing your conversation, but you can plug in earphones if you want, so I still use a headset for that, but it is fantastic as a conference phone – place it in the middle of the group of you and it picks up your voices from a good distance away, from all angles. You have the ability to mute the microphone if you want to stop sharing your audio (always useful if you want to converse privately before being open), change the volume if it gets too loud or quite (all done through something called the ‘digital signal processing’ technology).

It’s USB based and works easily on my Windows laptop and Mac desktop, integrates seamlessly with both Skype and Skype for Business, as well as nicely for Facetime on the Mac. What’s not to like?

Image source: Jabra website

Learning or achievement?

Irrespective of the assessment criteria or type of assessment used at the end of a course, we champion the achievement and base ‘learning’ on the final grade. For right or wrong, this is the state of schools, colleges, universities and MOOCs .. a pass grade equals success, not necessarily a quality learning experience.

When a course or programme goes through review, either for changes or it’s new, the conversation will always turn to the assessment. Is the assessment indicative of the course and the course aims? is the assessment type appropriate to the delivery method? Is it a straight forward 100% exam or mix of coursework and exam? If coursework is included in the final grade can the documentation be deliberately vague to allow flexibility in how and what the coursework is (project, group, video, report, tests, etc.)?

All well and good. Well, not really good but you know what I mean. But which is more important … the learning and knowledge acquisition or the assessment grade? Most of us would say the former, the learning and being able to retain an apply the knowledge. But education requires a certificate that shows more than just attendance. It requires to show the standard to which the holder has worked and can work. Without a score or grade (80% or 2:1) there is no meaning to the achievement for an employer to gauge the ability of the certificate holder.

Is there an answer? Could the achievement be recreated and reassessed to accommodate more meaningful information pertaining to the individual and how they ‘work’ and ‘learn’, and what kind of person they are? This is usually a reference on an application, but wouldn’t it be good if this had more emphasis on an application than a grade? Making something that can’t be gamed would be the hard part, anyone can find someone to write a glowing report and review, just like you can find online examples of buying the academic paper or script. 


What comes first when planning your course? The learning, or the achievement?
Click To Tweet


You could argue we’ve already got an achievement for learning that goes beyond the assessment with Open Badges. If so, why haven’t we seen them used more widely? What is holding us, or rather the employers, so tight to the grade result and not the achievement? A few years ago there was lots of talk about the scope and strength of Open Badges. Surely that hasn’t gone away. I hope it hasn’t gone away. 

Image source: The Old Adalie Plain (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Book recommendations?

If you recommended one book to someone to read, be it work-related or not, what would it be and why?

Here’s are four recommendations from me:

  • Creativity Inc. (Ed Catmull). Whilst mainly about the history of Disney Pixar this book is a fantastic insight into how a business or operation benefits from creative minds and creative approaches. I may not like Pixar or it’s film, but reading the book will give you a different perspective on how different approaches, and how you work with them, can benefit an individual and organisation.
  • Ready Player One (Ernie Cline). You may or may not like sci-fi books, but this one is a great look at the future. With everyone using OASIS, an all-access Facebook/Second Life mashup. The book is about who gets control of this behemoth of a system (and it’s money), but this book is great on so many levels, not least how Ernie Cline sees education in this future (very reminiscent of Issac Asimov here).
  • The subtle art of not giving a f**k (Mark Manson). Once you get past the title and profuse swearing there is a solid premise to this book .. learn how to manage your own life and responsibilities, as well as those who try and dump their troubles on you (personally or professionally). Well worth a read if you have ever felt you take on to much and can’t find yourself among the noise of others.
  • Learning with ‘E’s (Steve Wheeler). I have a huge amount of time for Steve and his work. This book is an insight into Steve, his work, his blog, and his thinking that if you have any interest in learning, eLearning and anything digital / teaching / learning then this is for you! Seriously, it is!

My other book reviews are available here.


If you recommended one book to someone to read, be it work-related or not, what would it be and why?
Click To Tweet


Image source: Andreas (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)